Smoke ring

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A layer of reddish tissue 1/8- to 1/4-inch wide that forms just beneath the surface (see [[bark]]) of slow smoked beef, pork, lamb, chicken, or other meats. The smoke ring is caused when nitrogen (N) from combusting wood or charcoal combines with oxygen in the air (O) to make nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The nitrogen dioxide then reacts with the moist surface of the meat to form nitrous acid, which shallowly penetrates the meat, creating the smoke ring prized by pit masters.
 
A layer of reddish tissue 1/8- to 1/4-inch wide that forms just beneath the surface (see [[bark]]) of slow smoked beef, pork, lamb, chicken, or other meats. The smoke ring is caused when nitrogen (N) from combusting wood or charcoal combines with oxygen in the air (O) to make nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The nitrogen dioxide then reacts with the moist surface of the meat to form nitrous acid, which shallowly penetrates the meat, creating the smoke ring prized by pit masters.
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[[Category:Techniques]]

Revision as of 21:22, 14 November 2013

A layer of reddish tissue 1/8- to 1/4-inch wide that forms just beneath the surface (see bark) of slow smoked beef, pork, lamb, chicken, or other meats. The smoke ring is caused when nitrogen (N) from combusting wood or charcoal combines with oxygen in the air (O) to make nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The nitrogen dioxide then reacts with the moist surface of the meat to form nitrous acid, which shallowly penetrates the meat, creating the smoke ring prized by pit masters.

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