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Poor Man's Brisket

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Post Sat Jun 26, 2004 10:42 pm
RichD medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 280
Location: New Jersey
Had wanted to do a brisket today, but man was it expensive this week. That and the store only had one that didn't look to good. So I thought what can I do. Chuck roast was on sale so I decided to get two nice size roasts. I used a simple rub and a brisket marinade/mop. The mop is beef broth based with ketchup, lemon juice, worcestershire sauce, liquid smoke, chili powder and a few other seasonings in it. I rubbed down the chucks and put them in the smoker at 9 this morning. Took them off at 5:30 with an internal temp of 173. Killer taste and so tender it melted in your mouth.
So if you want that brisket taste, but are a little short in the wallet at the time give a chuck roast a try. Treat it like a brisket and you won't be disapointed.
Oh, I forgot to mention that I had relatives in from Arizona and they loved it.

RichD

Post Sun Jun 27, 2004 10:56 am
RichD medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 280
Location: New Jersey
The chuck roast comes from the shoulder. It does not have a fat cap on it. It is however marbled with some larger areas of fat. If you do them low and slow like you would a brsket it will come out very tender. Mopping helps with the moisture so it was not dry at all. I smoked them in my horizontal offset using indirect heat. The haet was coming from the offset firebox. I had them on from about 9 in the morning until about 5:30 in the evening. I used the same rub and mop I would for a brisket and it was very good.
There is no water pan in my smoker, hence the reason for mopping often.

RichD

Post Mon Jun 28, 2004 8:12 am
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
I've smoked chuck roast before as well. You're right it does work. It's still not my favorite but a sale is a sale. I'd do it again. The key is to marinade, tenderize (a jaccard will do wonders!) and cook it low and slow. Due to the toughness and lack of fat if you try to do this cut without the above suggestions it will be a tough unpleasant meal.

There are some other posts here about this cut, try a search for them. I know one has BBcue Z's marinade. Which is how I've done mine, and is deffinately worth trying.

Good Luck and Enjoy!
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Post Mon Jun 28, 2004 1:43 pm
smokyblues well done
well done

Posts: 496
Location: Edmond, Oklahoma
Would bacon laid over the top of the roast help keep it moist during the cooking? By the way, what the #*&^ is a jaccard. Is it just some sort of a tenderizer ? Never heard of it.
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Oklahoma Joe's 20" Barrel Smoker aka "Betty"

Keep it Smokey

Post Mon Jun 28, 2004 2:06 pm
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
Bacon would inded be one way to add fat to the meat. There are alot of people who use bacon on everything from filets to pork to chicken and fish. Good stuff.
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A jaccard is a "new fangeled" kitchen gaget that comes in a 16 blade and 48 blade model.
I know you can get them many places and at Gril Lovers here:

Here's the link.

They are invaluable ifyou like doing things like chuckroast and london broil. There are even a few posts here dedicated to the jaccard.

Hope this helps!
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Post Mon Jun 28, 2004 2:21 pm
RichD medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 280
Location: New Jersey
Bacon would work to add fat to the process. I personally do not marinate them. I simply apply a rub, let it set and then mop. I bring the internal temp up to 173 at a minimum on upwards of 180-185. I keep my smoker at around 250. It takes about 7-10 hours. I have noticed that they will hit a temp of around 140 or so and sit there for a while before moving up to the temp I am looking for (similar to a pork butt or shoulder). I also find that this cut (at least what I get) is quite marbled with fat.
Done slow like this mine always come out moist and tender. That's not to say that a marinade wouldn't do good. In fact Z's recipe is on my hit list. Though I think the next thing I am going to tackle will be a whole turkey.

RichD

Post Tue Jun 29, 2004 2:02 pm
smokyblues well done
well done

Posts: 496
Location: Edmond, Oklahoma
I have done a couple of turkeys on my horizontal smoker. They turned out great but they just take so long to cook. When you are cooking it all by yourself and you need it ready by dinner time you are in for some work and sleep deprivation. I now own a turkey fryer.
Good luck
Weber Performer
Weber One Touch Silver
Oklahoma Joe's 20" Barrel Smoker aka "Betty"

Keep it Smokey

Post Tue Jun 29, 2004 2:28 pm
RichD medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 280
Location: New Jersey
I have read that it takes some time to cook. I have a turkey fryer too, but I have only used it for steaming crabs. The problem I have with it now is the beer / vinegar mixture I use to steam the crabs has eaten tiny little holes in the bottom of the pot. So it isn't much good for anything right now. I'm going to get a stainless steel pot for it. Maybe one of those fancy ones from Cabela's with the valve on the bottom.

RichD

Post Tue Jun 29, 2004 3:01 pm
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
Although I have not used one of teh ones witht he valve to me it just seems like one more thing that could malfunction or be something to snag. I do own and use one ofthe electric siphons. It works great and can be used with any size pot. My advise get the electric siphon and a standard pot. I'll be the costs just about wash out.
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Post Tue Jun 29, 2004 3:40 pm
RichD medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 280
Location: New Jersey
Grand, I was actually trying to be sarcastis. I agree the valve is just another thing to leak which is the last thing you want with a pot full of hot oil. I do want a stainless steel pot though. I think it will hold up much better for the things i use it for.
I will probably get the siphon as well. That way I can recylce the oil once I actually get the opportunity to fry a turkey. I've hear that frying chickens this way is good too. Have you tried this? How many can you do at one time?

RichD

Post Tue Jun 29, 2004 5:03 pm
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
Sorry Rich, sometimes sarcasm is tough to pick up when typing. But I agree with your assesment of the pot with the valve. I'm afraid that with that much heating and cooling that sucker would be bound to give out.
I have a 60qt stainless pot with a basket and love it. Its all I use anymore. The only problem I have is thats it a bit warped on the bottom in the shape of the burner bars due to the heat and the weight. (I use mine for 15 gallon batches of chili!). It warps because the stainless is thinner than aluminum but it is far easier to clean. One word of caution, unless you Mod your burner larger pots can become a little unstable because the sit on top of the safety ring instead of inside it.
I've done mainly chili, turkeys, and wings in mine. I've been meaning to do a seafood boil but just haven't gotten to it yet. I use mine less now that I'm a certified grill nut.
As for the number of chickens its proportinate to the size of you pot. In my 60qt I can do a 25lb turkey with room to spare.
But if you have any other questions I'll do my best to answer.
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