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base for sauce??

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Post Wed Jun 16, 2004 7:47 am
Big Belly rare
rare

Posts: 42
Location: Annapolis, MD
Well it really depends on what you are looking to achieve. In general there are three styles of doing the sauce, or so they say. Of course there are thousands of other variations using fruits and other goodies....

The memphis (sweet), carolinian(vinagry), and the Texas (which is a combo of both).

I too have been experimenting with creating my own signature sauces--still have not found the right blend yet. What I did do is take three recipes, one for each category and start playing with them.

As previously mentioned sauce and rubs are the hard part of development.
~:~:~:~:~:~:~:~:~:~
Big Belly
"Let's chew the fat!"

Post Thu Jun 17, 2004 12:20 am
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
Z, you consistently come out with creative ideas. Hopefully I can learn from you in person before you move away.

What I was looking for in the previous post is a list of the basic foundational sauces that most of the worlds sauces are built from..
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Thu Jun 17, 2004 6:32 am
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3049
Location: Atlanta-GA
Vinsect,
There are five basic sauces called "mother sauces." Those are: espagnole (brown stock-based), velouté (light stock-based), béchamel (basic white sauce), hollandaise and mayonnaise (emulsified sauces) and vinaigrette (oil-and-vinegar combinations). These are some of the world most famous sauces: adobo sauce; Albert sauce; Alfredo sauce; allemande sauce; aurore sauce; bagna cauda; barbecue sauce; bernaise sauce; Bercy sauce; beurre blanc; bigarade sauce; Bolognese; bordelaise sauce; bread sauce; brown sauce; chasseur sauce; chili sauce; chimichurri; Choron sauce; cocktail sauce; Colbert sauce; coulis; cream sauce; crème anglaise; Cumberland sauce; demi-glace; diable sauce; diplomat sauce; figaro sauce; garum; genevoise sauce; hard sauce; harissa sauce; hoisin sauce; hummus; kecap manis; ketchup; Louis sauce; Lyonnaise sauce; Maltaise sauce; marchands de vin; marguery sauce; marinara sauce; melba sauce; mole; Mornay sauce; mousseline; nam pla; Nantua sauce; Newburg sauce; Normande sauce; nuoc cham; oyster sauce; parisienne sauce; Perigueux sauce; pesto; piquante sauce; pistou; plum sauce; ponzu sauce; puttanesca sauce; ragu; ranchero sauce; rémoulade; romesco; rouille; shrimp sauce; skordalia; sofrito; soubise; soy sauce; supreme sauce; Tabasco; tamari; tartar sauce; tentsuyu; tomato sauce; tonnato sauce; verte sauce; Worcestershire sauce. Of course this list can go on forever. Anytime you alter a basic sauce a little, you can call it something else.
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Post Thu Jun 17, 2004 7:04 am
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
Z has anyone ever told you you're too smart and or have way to much time on your hands?

Once again, you da man!
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Post Thu Jun 17, 2004 6:23 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3049
Location: Atlanta-GA
Grand Scale wrote:
Z has anyone ever told you you're too smart and or have way to much time on your hands?

Once again, you da man!

Grand I’ve been told that once or twice :lol:
As far as too much time, I don’t sleep much, so I have to keep myself busy somehow :lol:
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Post Thu Jun 17, 2004 9:15 pm
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
Thanks Z, That's exactly what I was looking for. I'll save that post to a word doc. I'd like to learn how to make at least those 5 mother sauces.
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Fri Jun 18, 2004 2:26 pm
smokyblues well done
well done

Posts: 496
Location: Edmond, Oklahoma
I use tomato puree and vinegar as a base in the food processor then I start adding worchestire (?), brown sugar, soy sauce, molasses, honey, liquid smoke, some home made rub, onion flakes, different seaonings, garlic powder, pineapple juice, and whatever else I have on hand that sounds good. I just keep mixing all this together in the processor then I put in a pot on the stove for a few hours on a low temp.

Snooks, any luck with the 1500 person job you were bidding on?
Weber Performer
Weber One Touch Silver
Oklahoma Joe's 20" Barrel Smoker aka "Betty"

Keep it Smokey

Post Sun Jun 20, 2004 11:48 am
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
Next time I make sauce, I'll start it in my drip pan to catch the meat drippings and smoke flavor. I may make a modified double boiler by putting a smaller drip pan in a larger drip pan of water.
Anyone here tried that before? Any tips?
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Sun Jun 20, 2004 2:21 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3049
Location: Atlanta-GA
Vinsect,
I’ve used apple juice in that fashion with pork roast. The apple juice will concentrate in the drip pan and turns to dark brown syrup like glaze. I usually brush the roast with it towards the end of cooking time. It comes out real good.
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Post Mon Jun 21, 2004 12:55 am
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
I'd like to try making a soup this way too.
Z, thanks for the advice.
Who is it here that's into breads and soups again? Wonder if they've done soup this way?
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Mon Jun 21, 2004 1:02 pm
chagan well done
well done

Posts: 1350
Location: Central NJ by way of NY
Vinsect wrote:
I'd like to try making a soup this way too.
Z, thanks for the advice.
Who is it here that's into breads and soups again? Wonder if they've done soup this way?


All hale the Soup Nazi

http://topsecretrecipe.com/cgi-bin/sear ... submit.y=1
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No, it ain't burnt- it's barbecue

Post Wed Jun 23, 2004 4:14 pm
Grillzilla rare
rare

Posts: 37
Location: Virgina
I've become real acustomed to the "Wild Turkey" sauce in the Barbeque USA book. I kick it up with some fire roasted Poblano Chilies. It's a wonderful starting point for a burbon sauce.
"The more you learn to grill the less I have to cook" My Wife

Post Wed Jun 23, 2004 9:06 pm
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
Grillzilla,
welcome to the group. I love your name and your quote.
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Thu Jun 24, 2004 6:58 am
Grillzilla rare
rare

Posts: 37
Location: Virgina
Thanks Vinsect, we have really gotten into the grilling in the last couple of years. I bought a Char-Broil Pro and a Chargriller Smoker (Smokeasauras). The neighbors spend a lot of time sniffin' across the fence.
"The more you learn to grill the less I have to cook" My Wife

Post Fri Jun 25, 2004 10:26 pm
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
Keep grillin and keep posting.
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

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