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Suggestions for Two Tips and and a Turkey

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Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
This weekend for me has 2 Sirloin Tip Roasts and a Turkey in store for me and my Chargriller! Anyone have any "you've gotta try this" ideas on the subject. I'm probably going to back it up with corn ears and slaw and rolls and whatever sauce suits my fancy.
Thanks!
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Post Tue Jun 08, 2004 12:43 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3062
Location: Atlanta-GA
Grand,
Here is a method I posted earlier on preparing turkey. It has produced excellent results for me time and time again. Give it a try; you’ll definitely like the results.
“You know how some recipes call for working a flavored butter underneath the turkey skin. And the results are usually pretty good. I’ve done it many times. But after close observation, I noticed that the butter melts during the first 30 minutes of cooking. So what happens after several hour of cooking? Eventually the butter will run off and the turkey is left to dry. Since the butter have a very low melting point, it will melt very fast no matter what I do. So I went searching for something that would last long and give me a continuous basting advantage. I found that nothing work like pork fat. Yes, pork fat. I got a piece of fatback and sliced it to 1/8 of an inch slices, sprinkled them with salt, pepper and some herbs, then worked them in under the skin. This gave me several hours of automatic basting. The good thing about this method, it’s adjustable to the turkey size. If you have a large turkey and it’s going to take a longer cooking time, just slice the fat a little thicker and it will last longer. You may ask why didn’t I use bacon? Well I did, but I found bacon to be too thin and it did not last as long. Actually, it started to burn after a while. Turkey breast lacks the fat that other cuts of meat have; therefore it dries fast. Adding the pork fat fixes that problem. After all, why do we all love pork butt? Because it’s rich in pork fat!”

I will also post an excellent recipe for the Sirloin tip roast when I get home tonight.
Good luck!
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Post Tue Jun 08, 2004 1:19 pm
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
Thanks Z!
You're the man, I knew I could always count on you!
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Post Tue Jun 08, 2004 7:11 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3062
Location: Atlanta-GA
Grand,
Here is the recipe for the Sirloin Tip roast. I promise you, your guests will be begging for this recipe.
This recipe is for a 4-5 pound roast, adjust based on your amount.
For the dry Rub, you’ll need:
Salt & pepper to taste, paprika, granulated onion powder, ground coriander, cumin, chili powder or cayenne, white pepper, and lemon pepper. Adjust amounts to taste. I usually use one part of each; except for the onion powder I use two parts.
For the Marinade, you will need:
2-3 cups of buttermilk
2 tbs of lemon juice
2-3 tbs of molasses or cane syrup
3-4 cloves of garlic (or more if you like garlic)
1 large onion
1/4 cup of parsley- fresh
3 tbs of olive oil
2 tsp of paprika
2 tsp of the dry rub
Salt & pepper to taste
Cut up the onion into quarters and place in a food processor or a blender. Add the garlic, lemon juice, parsley, and olive oil to the processor. Process the ingredients until they form a fine paste. In a mixing bowl, combine the remaining ingredients and mix well. Add the onion mixture to the mixing bowl and blend well. Taste the marinade prior to placing the meat in it and adjust the seasoning to your taste.
Prepping the meat: if you have a Jaccard tenderizer, this is the time to use it. After tenderizing the roast, apply the dry rub all over the roast. Place the roast in the marinade, refrigerate and cover. Marinate the meat for 48 hours turning every 12 hours. If you place the roast in a Ziploc bag, you don’t have to turn it (if the marinade is covering the entire roast).
When ready to grill the meat, take it out of the marinade and dry it well. Make sure you reserve the remaining marinade; you will be using it for the sauce. Sear the meat on both sides on medium high heat. Move the meat to a cooler part of the grill (medium heat 325-350 degrees). I usually slice 3-4 pieces of onion in a circle shape and about 2 inch thick and make a rack out of them for the meat. I place the meat on the onion rack during the indirect/low heat cooking. This serves 2 purposes, one it keeps the roast of the grates preserving the grill marks and preventing over browning. Two, it gives the meat a nice onion flavor and smell. Once the meat reaches an internal temp of 125 degrees, I moved back over the medium high heat area of the grill to give it a nice crust. I usually take the meat off of the grill when it reaches a temp of 135 degrees for medium-rare. Set the meat aside and let it rest.
For the Sauce you’ll need:
The remaining marinade- well strained for smoother sauce
1/2 cup of buttermilk
1-2 tsp of cornstarch (depending on how thick you like it) dissolved in ¼ cup of cold water
1-2 tsp of Veal Demi-Glace or your favorite brown sauce
2-3 tbs of butter
Salt & pepper to taste
After draining the marinade, place in a saucepan with the additional buttermilk and bring to boil, and then reduce the heat to gentle simmer. Add the Demi-Glace or the brown sauce and mix until dissolve. Add the cornstarch/water mixture to the sauce and bring to boil. Once the sauce has boiled, lower the heat and adjust the thickness of the sauce by adding more buttermilk or more cornstarch/water mixture. Remember the sauce will not come to full thickness until it reaches the boiling point. When the sauce reaches the desired consistency (gravy like), turn the heat to the lowest possible point and stir in the butter (stir constantly). Once the butter completely dissolved, take the sauce off of the heat. Adding the butter at the end will give the sauce a smooth and silky texture. Taste the sauce and adjust the seasoning as needed.
Slice the meat thinly and top it off with the sauce. If you like sautéed mushrooms, you can add some to the sauce. If you prefer, serve the sauce on the side. The sauce should be a little darker than peanut butter in color.
Grand, since you’re cooking more than one roast, I hope you’ll try this recipe at least on one of them. I’m sure you’ll like it. This dish goes well with rice, pasta, and even crusty French bread.
Good Luck!
Last edited by BBcue-Z on Wed Jun 09, 2004 6:11 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Post Tue Jun 08, 2004 9:15 pm
ThrRoff well done
well done

Posts: 999
Location: Washington, DC

Z -- Wow that recipe sounds fantastic. I just copied to the recipe file. Do you do it over a gas or charcoal grill? And, do you add wood chips or anything like that?
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Post Wed Jun 09, 2004 6:08 am
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3062
Location: Atlanta-GA
Thanks ThrRoff,
I’ve done it over both gas and charcoal. And I always use wood chips/chunks for extra smoke flavor.
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Post Wed Jun 09, 2004 6:59 am
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
Wow Z that awesome. I can telll you now at least 1 if not both are getting "the Z treatment"!
That sounds really great. One lst question, in your experience what has been your total cooking time?
Man I wish it were Saturday, not for the weekend, but for the food!!
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Post Wed Jun 09, 2004 7:09 am
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3062
Location: Atlanta-GA
Last time I did a 4.5 pounds Sirloin Tip roast; it took around 45 min for medium-rare. But as you know, it all depends on the cooking temp and the thickness of the meat. You’re a pro, so I know you’ll judge it just right.
Good Luck!
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Post Thu Jun 10, 2004 1:41 pm
Wolfpackbbq well done
well done

Posts: 2631
Location: San Ramon, CA
Grand Scale,

The turkey reciepe I used at Thanksgiving was excellent. I made a garlic oil and injected the bird. Then I used a garlic/pepper/oil paste under the skin. Wrapped in in cheese cloth soaked with apple juice. I sprayed the bird regularly and removed the cheese cloth with 1.5 hours left on cooking. The only thing I did different than the receipe is I cooked at 350 instaed of the 225 called for. When we were first preparing it we thoughtis would be garlic overload and oily, but it was perfect.


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