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Aging

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Post Tue Jun 08, 2004 9:17 am
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
There's been alot of talk recently about aging beef yourself. I'll admit this is something I've yet to try. There was a great post a while back about dry aging at home that went into some more details and setups but I still didn't go for it. I know/understand/and have experience the difference between aged and unaged. My question is this how long is too long. I can hear my mothers voice in my head saying that if is a week old its no good. Does the aging "process" extend the life? Or is it alright to just let those steaks in the fridge for long periods, and how long is too long.

Hopefully someone smarter than I has some good answers and experiences, and maybe even a little science to explain it.
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Post Tue Jun 08, 2004 10:00 am
DarkRubiTJ medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 221
Location: Livingston, TX.
Grand-

Read my post on the Lone Star Steak, my experience really sold me on letting red meat sit in the fridge for a time.
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Weber "Q", Weber Performer, Weber 22.5" Bar-B-Kettle

Post Tue Jun 08, 2004 10:08 am
BrockinFla rare
rare

Posts: 13
Location: Florida

Grand Scale wrote:
There's been alot of talk recently about aging beef yourself. I'll admit this is something I've yet to try. There was a great post a while back about dry aging at home that went into some more details and setups but I still didn't go for it. I know/understand/and have experience the difference between aged and unaged. My question is this how long is too long. I can hear my mothers voice in my head saying that if is a week old its no good. Does the aging "process" extend the life? Or is it alright to just let those steaks in the fridge for long periods, and how long is too long.

Hopefully someone smarter than I has some good answers and experiences, and maybe even a little science to explain it.


You certainly can age beef at home with little or now problems at all. I do it all the time. Here is the short and basic list of knowledge you should know....

Some people do it in the kitchen refrigerator. I happen to have a spare fridge in the garage I use for making my own beer that I also use for dry aging beef. I have a special thermostat connected to the fridge that maintains a perfect 34-38 degrees.

You can not dry age a single steak. Don't waste your time. Also you can not dry age cheap grades of meat. You can only dry age the best grades of USDA Prime and some grade 1 or 2 of USDA Choice. You can only dry age a complete roast such as a complete rib roast or loin.

The science of it is simple. Its controlled rotting to put it bluntly. You place the meat in the fridge and wrap in clean dry cotton cloth. Naturally occurring enzymes begin to break down and tenderize the meat. It also develops a more meaty beef flavor.

Depending on the cut of meat, size and weight, you can age beef from 3 days to 6 weeks. Generally for home aging you can look at 21 days.

Dry aging is not cheap. You generally will lose up to 20% volume during the aging process as the meat begins to break down. A crust will form on the outside of the meat which you trim away and then cut the roast into steaks. You loose about another 25% here. So as you can see, what you start off with and end up with in the end is near the 50% mark. That being said, though the 50-55% you are left with are some fantastic steaks / meat which you will never be able to buy form your supermarket meat case.
Semper Fi

Post Tue Jun 08, 2004 10:40 am
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
Brock thanks for the great response, you answered exactly what I was looking for. And Dark you're Lone Star thread is what go me thinking.

So just to clarify you can't dry age a single steak, or even a bunch of cut steaks because by the time they age and you cut the waste away your waste would eliminate the steak itself.

Would it also be fair to say that the waste woild be the spoiled parts (crusty you said), and that not cutting this off could be unhealthy.

There's also a bit more to it than just leaving in the fridge.

I think that for those of us willing to go through the process it sounds great but my fear was the average joe was going to run out to the grocery store, buy a value pack of NY strips, throw them in the meat drawer, and just let them sit in the fridge for 21 days, cook them and then proceed to make themselves and their guests very sick.

Thanks for clearing things up.
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Post Tue Jun 08, 2004 12:50 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3056
Location: Atlanta-GA
Grand,
I followed these set of instructions to age beef: http://www.azbbqa.com/Articles/dryagedbeef.shtml
I’ve done it several times and it produced excellent results. It’s pretty much what stated above.
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Post Tue Jun 08, 2004 3:43 pm
Guest

In my home state of Alaska some of the natives I knew would age wild game in a very similar way. The fall temps usually hung around 35-45 degrees, they would wrap moose or caribou/reindeer in cotten game bags, then hang them from spruce racks for up to three weeks. At that time they would cut or scrape off the outer inch or so leaving behind some wonderful cuts of meat. So if any of ya are hunters, this may work for you as well. I do enjoy aged beef as well.

Post Tue Jun 08, 2004 3:47 pm
AKGriller rare
rare

Posts: 22
Location: Minnesota
Forgot to log in on that last post.

Post Wed Jun 09, 2004 1:45 am
hotchef well done
well done

Posts: 319
Location: Florence, AL
This sounds like something that I would love to try but don't have the funds to buy a whole loin. BBcue, didn't you post that you aged a single (but rather large) New York Strip to good results? I could probably swing buying a big ribeye and aging it, but not a whole.
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Post Wed Jun 09, 2004 5:56 am
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3056
Location: Atlanta-GA
You may want to try a small Rib roast. It’s thick enough to withstand the process, and it will give you about 3-4 ribeye steaks. The steak I did was almost 4 inches thick and weighed over 21/2 pounds. I let it age for 7 days.
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Post Wed Jun 09, 2004 8:46 am
Big D well done
well done

Posts: 616
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
I am trying dry aging right now and am 11 dyas in an plan on leaving it for another 10. I love dry aged steak. At my favorite Steakhouse I always ask for their Porterhouse dry aged for at least 40 days... they serve all their steaks a minimum of 26 days and up to 60 I believe. But they have a very professional butcher shops and highquality meat lockers so I trust them more than myself.

I have confidence it will work out

Post Wed Jun 09, 2004 9:10 am
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
We accidentally aged some ribeyes in the fridge last year and fed them to the dogs :oops:
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Post Wed Jun 09, 2004 11:55 am
Yankee Bill medium
medium

Posts: 115
Location: Norfolk, Va.
Been there, done that, Bob :roll: . I feel your pain! . YB2
I'll eat anything that won't eat me first !!!

Post Wed Jun 09, 2004 12:03 pm
JDasmokin rare
rare

Posts: 24
Location: Sothern Indiana
Very good info
Thanks
At our favorite steak house they age there beef and it is always excellent.


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