Board index Barbecue Board FAQs and How-To's Frequently Asked Questions (Organized by Topic)

Frequently Asked Questions (Organized by Topic)

From board specific to BBQ specific and back again, all the information you'll need to enjoy your stay here or in your backyard.
Info@Workman Site Admin
Site Admin

Posts: 590

This will be the area for general FAQs, then we can group by topic area in various replies.

See also:
Welcome New Members! Some FAQ's


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Post Wed Mar 22, 2006 12:30 pm
Info@Workman Site Admin
Site Admin

Posts: 590

Quick guide to the abbreviations we use around here

GOSM: Great Outdoors Smoky Mountain Smoker
WSM: Wber Smokey Mountain Bullet Smoker
BCC: Beer Can Chicken
BBC: Beer Butt chicken = BCC
CCC: Coke Can Chicken = BCC
HTG - How to Grill
CG - Chargriller
SFB - side fire box
TVWB - The Virtual Weber Bullet (BBQ board)
ECB - El Cheapo Brinkmann
ABT - Atomic Buffalo Turd (stuffed jalapeno pepper)
Fatty - Smoke breakfast sausage log or chub (like Jimmy Deans)
EVOO = Extra Virgin Olive Oil


Standard abbreviations

BTW - By the way
IMHO - In my humble opinion
IMO - In my opinion
LOL - Laughing out loud
IME - In my experience
OTOH - On the other hand
YMMV - Your Mileage May Vary
IIRC - If I Recall Correctly
Last edited by Info@Workman on Tue Apr 11, 2006 12:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Post Tue Apr 11, 2006 12:15 pm
Info@Workman Site Admin
Site Admin

Posts: 590

An easier way to read through the archives

If you are interested in finding pages of the threads in the archives in this board, follow these tips below.

When you get to page 17, for example, note the numbers after the last / (slash) in your browsers address bar. Jot down those numbers (or bookmark the page).

When you start reading again, click on page 3. When it loads, change the numbers after the / in the address to the ones you've previously recorded. Hit enter, and you'll get back to your place in the threads.

This makes it easy to jump around in the archives, too, especially if you're looking for seasonal posts. For example, change the /1250 to /1650 to see what time period it covers. Increase or decrease the /1650 to zero in on the time frame you'd like to read.

Take some time to explore the capability of moving around by changing the end of the forum topics page links.

Post Wed Apr 12, 2006 11:20 am
Info@Workman Site Admin
Site Admin

Posts: 590

Meat temperatures, cooking temperatures and meat safety

To see the original post, please follow this link:
http://www.barbecuebible.com/board/viewtopic.php?t=5893&highlight=



One of the biggest factors in foodborne-illness outbreaks is time-temperature abuse. Disease-causing bacteria microorganisms grow and multiply at temperatures between 41 degrees F and 135 degrees F. Whenever food is held in the temperature danger range, it is being abused.

Common opportunities for time-temperature abuse throughout the flow of food include:
-- Not cooking food to its required minimum internal temperature
-- Not cooling food properly
-- Failing to reheat food to 165 degrees F for fifteen seconds within two hours (If the food falls below the minimum temperature requirement of 140 degrees F, it has to be reheated to 165 degrees F for 15 seconds, minimum, within two hours.)
-- Failing to hold food at a minimum internal temperature of 135 defrees F or higher or 41 degrees F or lower

Ground Meats -- including: beef, pork, and other meat or fish.

Minimum internal temperature 155 degrees F for 15 seconds.

Most whole-muscle cuts of meat are likely to have microorganisms only on their surface. When meat is ground, microorganisms on the surface are mixed throughout the product.

Ground meat may also be cooked to the following alternative internal temperatures:
-- 145 degrees F for 3 minutes
-- 150 degrees F for 1 minute
-- 155 degrees F for 15 seconds
-- 158 degrees F for <1 second


Pork, Beef, Veal, Lamb

steaks/chops 145 degrees for 15 seconds

roasts 145 degrees for 4 minutes

This temperature is high enough to destroy Trichinella spp. larvae that might have contaminated pork.

Depending on the type of roast and the oven used, roasts may be cooked to the following alternative internal temperatures.

-- 130 degrees F for 112 minutes
-- 131 degrees F for 89 minutes
-- 133 degrees F for 56 minutes
-- 135 degrees F for 36 minutes
-- 136 degrees F for 28 minutes
-- 138 degrees F for 18 minutes
-- 140 degrees F for 12 minutes
-- 142 degrees F for 8 minutes
-- 144 degrees F for 5 minutes
-- 144 degrees F for 4 minutes

Stuffed Fish (or Stuffing Containing Fish)

165 degrees F for 15 seconds

Ground, chopped, or minced fish
155 degrees F for 15 seconds


Cooked vegetables must never be held at room temperatures

Commercially processed, Ready to eat food that will be hot-held for service

135 degrees F for 15 seconds

This includes items such as: cheese sticks, deep-fried vegetables, chicken wings, etc.


Cross contamination of food.

If you don't do this, please consider it. When you prepare food, do you use the same cutting board and utensils for all your food? If so, STOP.

Use different cutting boards and utensils for each type of food. Example: one for poultry, a second for other meats, and a third for vegetables. Consider different colored boards and handles. If you don't, make sure you sanitize all your items before going to another type of food.

And don't forget to wash and dry your hands as well.



Recommended requirements for storing food:

Meat: -- store fresh at an internal temperature of 41 degrees F or lower

Poultry -- Store fresh at an internal temperature of 41 degrees F or lower

Fish -- Store fresh at an internal temperature of 41 degrees F or lower

Shellfish -- Store alive at an internal temperature of 45 degrees F or lower

Eggs -- Store fresh at an internal temperature of 45 degrees F or lower

Dairy -- Store fresh at an internal temperature of 41 degrees F or lower

Ice Cream and Frozen Yogurt -- Store frozen at a temperature of 6 degrees F to 10 degrees F

To hold food at a specific internal temperature, refrigerator air temperature should be at least 2 degrees F lower than the desired temperature.

Keep freezer temperature at 0 degrees F or lower unless the food you are storing requires a different temperature.

Use caution when placing food into a freezer. Warm food can raise the temperature inside the unit and partially thaw the food inside. Store food to allow good air circulation. Overloading a freezer makes it work harder, and make it harder to find and rotate food properly.

Lining shelves with aluminum foil or paper restricts circulation of cold air in the unit.

Never place hot food in the refrigerator. This can warm the interior enough to put other food in the temperature danger zone.


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