Board index Barbecue Board General Discussion Wood for BBQing

Wood for BBQing

This is the place to ask your BBQ questions, share information, and more.
Post Fri Apr 09, 2004 12:04 pm

Posts: 5
Location: South Carolina, for now
We had a terrific ice storm here in January, and as a result have an opportunity to get plenty of wood. The types available to us are oak, pecan, pine and dogwood. I basically know not to mess with the pine, but what about the pecan and dogwood? Oak is a given, but I'm not sure we should just chip up the pecan. Can you use dogwood for BBQing?
Thanx.
Pass the BBQ, and make it quick! I'm in withdrawal here!

Post Fri Apr 09, 2004 12:50 pm
Guest

Pecan is great for smoking, especially if you'd like to smoke some peppers, and is great for brisket. I've never heard of any one using dogwood, so I can't give you an opinion.

Post Fri Apr 09, 2004 1:12 pm
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
As blackdog pointed out pecan is great for smoking. I use it often. Definitely no pine! And I’ve only heard of using dogwood once in an article about a homemade brick barbecue pit called The Wilber D. Hog Pit. Since I; haven’t used it, don’t know anyone who has, and only have one reference, I would strongly recommend researching it further before using dogwood.

Also I’d recommend removing the bark from the pecan before using it.
Image

Post Fri Apr 09, 2004 4:42 pm

Posts: 5
Location: South Carolina, for now
Thanx for the tips. I've just spent the last several hours searching on the web, and only the Wilbur site mentions dogwood. I may just try it on some chicken first......... I'll let y'all know if anything good comes of it.
I'll have to teach my husband how to debark the pecan, but then again it's been so long since I did it myself, I may not remember how! :wink:
BTW, that Wilbur setup was awesome! I would kill to build one of those. Maybe one day we will.
Thanx again.
Pass the BBQ, and make it quick! I'm in withdrawal here!

Post Fri Apr 09, 2004 5:46 pm
Airfoils well done
well done

Posts: 1063
BarbecuingMania wrote:
Thanx for the tips. I've just spent the last several hours searching on the web, and only the Wilbur site mentions dogwood. I may just try it on some chicken first......... I'll let y'all know if anything good comes of it.
I'll have to teach my husband how to debark the pecan, but then again it's been so long since I did it myself, I may not remember how! :wink:
BTW, that Wilbur setup was awesome! I would kill to build one of those. Maybe one day we will.
Thanx again.


Barkless wood is better than wood with bark on it but don't knock yourself out trimming bark off of it. Just as long as the ratio is pretty low, you can avoid the taste it gives. Some people think it's a bitter taste but to me it's more of an earthy 'flavor'.

Post Sun Apr 11, 2004 2:21 am
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
Catfish smoked over dogwood would be kinda ironic.
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:17 am
SandRaven medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 57
Location: Rockford, IL
My neighbor chopped down a small apple tree. It only has a few branches bigger thar 1" diameter. Are the smaller twings good to use or will they be too barky? Do I need to let it dry for a year or can I use it now?

Post Mon Apr 12, 2004 11:20 am
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
Welcome to the discussion group SandRaven!

I recently obtained some apple wood from a local orchard. They too have a lot of small clippings. I understand that some tree bark can make foods bitter, but since apple is a mild wood and the bark is very thin on these smaller branches I'm going to give them a try to see how they taste. You don't have to let the apple wood dry. Most BBQ’ers recommend seasoned wood for smoking, but in recent conversation and some looking around on the Internet, I've found that several folks use green wood. Some say there is a difference in taste and other claim they can't distinguish between the two. Go ahead and give it a try.
Image

Post Tue Apr 13, 2004 12:26 am
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
I had a customer today that says he uses a wood called "sourwood."
I don't know if this is just a nickname for something else or what? Anyone heard of sourwood?
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Tue Apr 13, 2004 10:32 am
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
Vinsect I've never heard sourwood. After searching I found that it grows in the southeast (your area) and bees make a great honey from it.

Sourwood
Sourwood is a small medium-size tree which is common in the southern part of the Appalachian mountains from West Virginia and Southern Pennsylvania to Northern Georgia. The honey is light in color and has a fine, mild flavor. It is often considered the most delicious in the eastern states and is mostly sold as comb honey or chunk comb honey.


Oxydendrum arboreum
Scientific name: Oxydendrum arboreum
Author: Augustine-Pyramus de Candolle (1778–1841)
Common name: Sorrel Tree, Sourwood, Lily-of-the-valley Tree
Family: Ericaceae

Sorry I couldn't find more.
Image

Post Tue Apr 13, 2004 11:55 pm
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
Bob-BQN,
Thats awesome. Once you know the scientific name of a plant, you can do a search by it and find out all you want.
That helps a lot.
For starters I've found other common names include sorrel tree, & lily of the valley tree.
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Wed Apr 14, 2004 12:45 am
Big D well done
well done

Posts: 616
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
I am brand new at smoking and my local bbq stores sell Hickory, Mesquite, Apple flavoured wood chips/chunks...

Since were on the subject, can I smoke with a Sugar Maple wood? If so, I sometime use a maple glaze that I oringally made for a turkey for thanksgiving but has become so popular with friends that I sometime use it when grilling pork chops and chicken, etc. Would the maple smoke be good with the existing maple flavour? ( I assuming it would produce a mild-sweet smoke based on the sap being used for syrup)

This would be very useful if so, where I live I have an abundance of Maple and Birch trees

Post Wed Apr 14, 2004 10:04 am
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
Although I haven't had the pleasure of using these woods yet, I do plan to use Maple. Maple produces a light sweet taste recommended for poultry and ham and Birch has a similar flavor and use as Maple. I'm sure that the smoke from Maple would complement your glaze. If you can give it a try I'd like to hear how it turns out. :D

Here's another post referring to smoking woods: What woods do you recommend for smoking?

Hope this helps!
Image

Post Wed Apr 14, 2004 6:45 pm
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
The main thing with your maple glaze would probably be to try to keep your temp below 320 degrees. If my memory serves me correctly, that's the temp sugar scorches at.
But a sugar based glaze or rub at lower temps should help seal in juices.
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.


Return to General Discussion

cron