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Timing to quantity of food.

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Post Thu Apr 08, 2004 10:52 am
RichD medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 280
Location: New Jersey
I have decided to make the beer can chicken this weekend along with some roasted potatoes. I know both should take 1-1 1/2 hours to cook. If I am going to do two chickens and 6-8 potatoes should I allow for an increased cooking time?
I will be using my gas grill as I have not yet picked up my smoker/charcoal grill yet.

Thanks

RichD

Post Thu Apr 08, 2004 11:00 am
chagan well done
well done

Posts: 1350
Location: Central NJ by way of NY
Yes Rich, the cooking time will increase if doing 2 chickens- however the time will not double. You should check for doneness by measuring the temp of the chickens at the thickest part of the thigh, without touching the bone, using a meat thermometer. The temp should read about 170. Some say that it should read 180, but I believe that is over done. Besides the meat will cook further once it is removed from the grill and is resting. HTH
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No, it ain't burnt- it's barbecue

Post Thu Apr 08, 2004 11:26 am
RichD medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 280
Location: New Jersey
Thanks, I figured it would I just wanted someone to confirm that for me. I agree 180 is overdone. I llike to take it of the heat at about 165 and let it finish on it's own while resting.

RichD

Post Fri Apr 09, 2004 11:08 am
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
I also agree that 180 degrees is too done for chicken. We made the Florida Jalapeno-Pineapple Chicken from BBQ USA in which the recipe calls for 180. I found the fiber of the meat breaks down too much for my taste. I prefer the texture of chicken when it's cooked to 170 degrees.
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Post Sat Apr 10, 2004 3:50 pm
PaulP well done
well done

Posts: 681
Location: Beautiful St. Mary's County, Maryland
I haffta disagree on this one guys. The only time quantity of food affects cooking time is if you're cooking in a microwave - has to do with absorption of microwaves or some physics thing.

Think about it. If you're cooking two chickens in a standard oven do you increase cooking time? No, not unless you put so much stuff in the oven that you prevent hot air from circulating. Same thing applies to your grill or smoker. I've done this both in a grill and an oven and never seen any noticible increase in cooking time. Two birds of equal weight will cook in the same time as one of them will.

There must be someone on this board witha knowledge of thermodynamics to explain this!
PaulP
If you don't like the food, have more wine

Post Sun Apr 11, 2004 10:08 am
Airfoils well done
well done

Posts: 1063
Too many variables. It's all about the thermometer.

Post Mon Apr 12, 2004 12:27 am
YardBurner BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5376
Location: Damascus, Maryland
I don't do the thermowhtzitthingeee. BUUTT!

Most problems occur when either the cooker, et al, is not properly preheated, the cooker is overloaded (heat source to weak, food to cold) and you don't allow enough air circulation. (Remember grills and smokers cook with convection AND radiant heat).

These all contribute to timing problems and under done food.

As stated throughout this site and all of the Guru's (and others) books

USE THAT $40.00 THERMOMETER!!! :evil: :!:

Yb

Post Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:33 am
Guest

Good Morning All,

Too busy this weekend putting together my new Charbroil Silver Smoker to keep up with the posts.
I am happy to say that the assembly went well ans I had the opportunity to use it on Saturday.
I cooked two beer can chickens and six large potatoes and all were done in about 1 1/2 Hrs.
This being my first experience with the new grill I was very pleased with how everything came out.
I am thinking of using the firebox and smoking some ribs this weekend. I was going to do a brisket, but due to a scheduling issue I won't hav eneough time.

RichD

Post Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:39 am
RichD medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 280
Location: New Jersey
I have to remember how quick the time out is.
That last post was from me.
Thanks for all the feedback.

RichD

Post Mon Apr 12, 2004 1:00 pm
chagan well done
well done

Posts: 1350
Location: Central NJ by way of NY
Thermodynamics is the study of the movement of heat. The basic equations that govern turkey cooking were formulated in 1947 by H. S. Carslaw and J. C. Jaeger, in a work called Conduction of Heat in Solids.

To apply their equations, you assume that the oven is a constant temperature throughout, that the rate at which heat passes through the turkey is independent of both how long and how hot it is cooked, and that the turkey is perfectly spherical.

The time it takes heat to diffuse through this idealized turkey to raise the center to a certain temperature is proportional to the square of the radius. Since real turkeys aren't spherical, you have to figure out how big a real turkey would be if it were converted into a sphere. You can do this based on mass; the mass of a sphere is proportional to the cube of its radius.

Since we know that one turkey (or chicken for that matter) is not a perfect sphere, I'm sure that we can agree that it is much closer to that than TWO turkeys or spheres which will give you a kind of figure 8 pattern when viewed from above. This will affect the airflow greatly (because your cooking chamber didn't increase in size, and the surface area of the turkey or chicken has now greatly increased (if we consider them as one bird, not two for a moment). Also understanding that there is no such thing as cold, only lack of heat, and that heat flows from high capacity environments, to low- your heat source to your poultry, we must assume that it will require more energy to keep the oven at say 350 than it would with one bird. Now the oven in our house is controlled by a thermostat and should quickly adjust and bring the temp back up to 350 with minimal impact, however when indirect cooking outside, one must be aware of the impact of the second bird, and either increase the airflow or increase the temp by adding fuel or turning up the burner, that or increase the cooking time. In addition...........rrrrr.......aaaaaa........ nevermind........ Paul, you're probably right.


Cheers
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No, it ain't burnt- it's barbecue

Post Mon Apr 12, 2004 2:25 pm
YardBurner BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5376
Location: Damascus, Maryland
Thank you Perfesser Chagan!

(Ginger or Maryanne?)

Post Mon Apr 12, 2004 3:13 pm
chagan well done
well done

Posts: 1350
Location: Central NJ by way of NY
Why are we leaving out Mrs. Howell? Some prefer the "mature" types ya know. :wink: Oh Lovey..........
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No, it ain't burnt- it's barbecue

Post Mon Apr 12, 2004 3:40 pm
PaulP well done
well done

Posts: 681
Location: Beautiful St. Mary's County, Maryland
Thank you Chagan!! I should have known that anyone who is enough of a geek to understand theromodynamics would be totally unable to speak english about it! :roll:

Let me try another way to explain it:
There are three variables that come into play when cooking meat (or anything else) to a selected internal temperature using a heat source (that is, NOT a microwave). The variables are amount of heat supplied (cooking temperature), thickness of meat, and time. Changing one affects the others. So, if you lower the cooking temperature, you must either increase the time or reduce the thickness of the meat to compensate.

If it takes 1 hour to cook a 3 1/2 lb chicken to 175 degrees internal at 350 degrees, it will take the same amount of time to cook 2, 3,...n chickens AS LONG AS the temperature is maintained at 350. In practice, the number that can be cooked successfully is limited by the size of the cooking unit. You will at some point have enough stuff in the unit that air circulation is restricted sufficiently that nothing cooks properly. For all but the smallest units, that number is greater than two.

There, Chagan, I did it without once mentioning spherical chickens. :shock:

PaulP
PaulP
If you don't like the food, have more wine

Post Mon Apr 12, 2004 4:03 pm
Airfoils well done
well done

Posts: 1063
Problem is, the variables vary. :lol:

Post Mon Apr 12, 2004 4:38 pm
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
I have done this with chickens. Each time I cooked at 225 degrees and brought the internal meat temperature of the chicken breasts to 170 degrees:

One chicken took 4 hours
Two chickens took 5 hours
Sorry haven’t done three
Four chickens took 6.5 hours
Five chickens took 7.5 hours

Therefore I conclude that the Mass of the meat/food does affect cooking times. I agree that when you change one variable it will cause another to need adjustment. You must consider that Mass is a variable. (A bigger turkey takes longer to cook, even if it isn't perfectly round :wink: )
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