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Direct grilling Q

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Post Thu Apr 08, 2004 10:51 am
Smokecoat rare
rare

Posts: 39
Location: Overland Park, KS
When I'm direct grilling a steak or chop, is it best to keep the lid to my gas grill open or closed? I'm wondering if I'm "baking" the meat too much by keeping it closed.
Thanks for the input!

Post Thu Apr 08, 2004 11:19 am
chagan well done
well done

Posts: 1350
Location: Central NJ by way of NY
Hi Smokecoat and welcome to the Board!! This question is a popular one, and has been visited before. I"ll let you read those posts for more info. But the basic answer is if the steak or chop is about an inch, more or less, then covering is not neccessary- unless required by the weather.

http://barbecuebible.com/board/viewtopic.php?t=663

http://barbecuebible.com/board/viewtopi ... ght=steaks
Image

No, it ain't burnt- it's barbecue

Post Fri Apr 09, 2004 2:11 am
smoke rare
rare

Posts: 26
Oh man, Cover a steak? Weber has done a lot for grilling, but they have also poisoned a lot of minds. Don't get me started on their idea to use a kettle as a smoker. Oh man, I am getting hotter than an open grill with lump charcoal and air, lots of air, fresh air, smokey air giving flavor to that quickly seared steak.

And I don't know who came up with this idea that wood burns hotter than charcoal. If that was so nobody would have made charcoal.

No man, for steak, lump charcoal, (you know, you never have to wonder when lump is ready to pour out of your chimney starter, you just pour it when you are afraid your chimney is gonna melt.)

And don't ever bake a steak. I know some hands say a porterhouse needs even heat. Yeah, it also needs air.

We serve a lot of steaks, this place I work now. I don't think they'd fire me, but I'm sure they would recomend pyschiatric counseling if I ever put a lid on a steak.

Post Fri Apr 09, 2004 2:26 am
smoke rare
rare

Posts: 26
and I don't want to start a fight here (well actually I do) but there are to scweles of slop here.
screwel of slop #number one

1. rotate

screwel of slop #number two

2. If you think of a t-bone or porterhouse, imagine the tail

so it goes

tail at 4 o'clock

flip

tail at 8 o'clock

flip

tail at 8 o'clock

flip

tail at 4 o'clock

Did I say srewels of slop?

I meant schools of thought

It's just hard for me sometimes to imagine a chef thinking

Post Fri Apr 09, 2004 9:05 am
Airfoils well done
well done

Posts: 1063
smoke wrote:
It's just hard for me sometimes to imagine a chef thinking


LOL! Irony alert! Do you really think you're going to troll here and imply chefs are idiots and not be called out on it? :roll: Steve is a classicaly trained chef, and I'd bet we have a few board members that are as well. Maybe you're smarter than they and we can just direct all questions to you from know on oh culinary master of the universe. Have you ever worked 'on the line' at a popular restaurant on a busy night? Chef's are some of the best multitaskers there are and they often do it under heavy pressure night after night.

Post Fri Apr 09, 2004 10:40 am
Smokecoat rare
rare

Posts: 39
Location: Overland Park, KS
Can I get a little more follow-up about whether a steak or chop is better with the top down or "given air"?

Smoke, while pseudo-witty, you're not clear on your reasoning.

Thanks for all the input!

Post Fri Apr 09, 2004 12:58 pm
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
Smokecoat there are times when I close the lid on my grill while cooking steak. Since I prefer my steak med-well I want it to cook through more than those that want theirs rare.

Typically for thicker cuts, to sear the outside of the steak I’ll start with the lid open. When I first place the meat on the grill I like for the flames to kiss the meat and caramelize the edges (and it’s O.K. if ya’ll like it different). Then, by design and because my grates are fixed, I must close the lid to utilize the vents for temperature control and extinguish the flames to prevent burning my meal. Also weather and wind may encourage you to close the lid. Some use heat zones and move the steak to a cooler area to prevent burning, but I usually have a lot of meat to cook and just use one hot zone.

For thinner cuts under ¾” or so, I normally cook with the lid open as the meat will finish cooking to the desired doneness before the outside burns.

Hope this helps.
Image

Post Fri Apr 09, 2004 3:50 pm
smoke rare
rare

Posts: 26
sorry, it was a busy night last night on the line. So when I got home it just seemed funny to be "thinking" about food.

and yes, if I was cooking a steak and it was getting burned on the outside and not getting cooked inside I would just put a lid on it.

As a matter of fact, lately a lot of people have been telling me to just put a lid on it.

Post Sat Apr 10, 2004 11:48 am
chagan well done
well done

Posts: 1350
Location: Central NJ by way of NY
smoke wrote:
And I don't know who came up with this idea that wood burns hotter than charcoal. If that was so nobody would have made charcoal.


Actually, charcoal was a byproduct of the automotive industry (Henry Ford, who sold the side business to a relative-Kingsford) it was not "thought up" to be a replacement for cooler burning wood. Wood burns hottest, then lump, and finally charcoal briquettes. Charoal was ideal for barbecueing due to it's longer and consistent burn, and ease of use. It was then possible for the masses to participate in barbecueing without having to be a fire expert. If one really wants to get particular- natural lump IS wood, it just underwent a physical change by being burned with little oxygen.
Last edited by chagan on Sat Apr 10, 2004 11:59 am, edited 1 time in total.
Image

No, it ain't burnt- it's barbecue

Post Sat Apr 10, 2004 11:51 am
Airfoils well done
well done

Posts: 1063
chagan wrote:
smoke wrote:
And I don't know who came up with this idea that wood burns hotter than charcoal. If that was so nobody would have made charcoal.


Actually, charcoal was a byproduct of the automotive industry (Henry Ford, who sold the side business to a relative-Kingsford) it was not "thought up" to be a replacement for cooler burning wood. Wood burns hottest, then lump, and finally charcoal briquettes. Charoal was ideal for barbecueing due to it's longer and consistant burn, and ease of use. It was then possible for the masses to participate in barbecueing without having to be a fire expert. If one really wants to get particular- natural lump IS wood, it just underwent a physical change by being burned with little oxygen.


Hehehe, nuff said! :D

Post Sat Apr 10, 2004 12:04 pm
chagan well done
well done

Posts: 1350
Location: Central NJ by way of NY
chagan wrote:
it just underwent a physical change by being burned with little oxygen.


Actually, I believe that it's a chemical change- sorry. :wink:
Image

No, it ain't burnt- it's barbecue

Post Sat Apr 10, 2004 2:39 pm
PaulP well done
well done

Posts: 681
Location: Beautiful St. Mary's County, Maryland
My practice is tro leave the lid open when cooking steaks or chops up to about 1 3/4 inches thick. I don't use a cooler zone, and I can easily cook the steak as well-done as desired. The outside gets darker on a well-done steak, but never burned. Steaks 2 in. or more may require reducing the heat and closing the lid to prevent burning the outside. I don't do this often because I prefer to serve individual steaks, and a 2" thick one is too much for most people.

The only exception I make to this rule is if the temp is down at 40 or lower and then I'll close the lid to preserve heat.
PaulP
If you don't like the food, have more wine

Post Sat Apr 10, 2004 2:42 pm
PaulP well done
well done

Posts: 681
Location: Beautiful St. Mary's County, Maryland
BTB...just for your info, cooking at high temperatures over direct heat is called grilling, not barbecuing.
PaulP
If you don't like the food, have more wine

Post Sun Apr 11, 2004 2:42 am
smoke rare
rare

Posts: 26
I just assume nobody ever takes me seriously. When they do I never know whether to play with them or feel sorry for them.

Forget the steak for a moment, anybody who wants their steak cooked medium or medium well is just simply trying to defy nature so there is no hope for them.

Like I said, I work in a joint, and you ought to see what they do to a steak when somebody orders it medium or medium well. It's just like telling the chef to ruin a piece of meat for me because I don't like the way God intended it to be cooked.

However there is a slight bit of respect for the rare customer who orders well done.

But now lump not hotter than wood?

Why then would anybody go to all the trouble of charring a piece of wood? What are they hoping to accomplish?

Here you have a chunk of wood and it is supposed to burn hotter than anything, but instead we will try to turn it into charcoal so it will be more labor intensive and expensive?

Man, you burn a chimney of wood next to a chimney of lump at night and see which one glows so hot it scares you.

I'm darn near a vegetarian so I don't care. But if anyone gave me a steak and convinced me it wasn't finished off in one of those meatrix feed lots like they have in Amarillo, I would definately get a hot lump fire going.

My best for His best.

Post Sun Apr 11, 2004 8:25 am
Airfoils well done
well done

Posts: 1063
:roll:

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