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turkey drumsticks/beer can turkey

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Post Mon Apr 05, 2004 11:08 pm
dmcdtc rare
rare

Posts: 27
I am considering smoking turkey drumsticks and/or beer can turkey for Easter.

Anybody smoke drumsticks? Any tips? How long to cook? Rubs, etc. Do they turn out moist?

I have the 'Beer Can Chicken' book and am thinking about doing the beer can turkey recipe. Anyone use it? Is the turkey moist like a beer can chicken?

Dennis

Post Tue Apr 06, 2004 1:35 am
YardBurner BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5376
Location: Damascus, Maryland
I can speak on the drumsticks.

Indirect or grill roasting is the way to go. Drip pan in center. Heat to the sides. Season as you like and cook at 300 or so. Smaller cuts really don't benefit from slow smoking as they are done , then over done too quickly. Since you didn't mention your grill/smoker type these are general guidelines. Try brining the legs first and you will be assured of moist meat.

YB

Post Tue Apr 06, 2004 7:41 am
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3046
Location: Atlanta-GA
The first time I had smoked Turkey drumsticks was at The Renaissance Festival near Atlanta.
I loved them and decided to make them at home every since. I would defiantly brine them first. I also like to add some of the rub spices to the brine. The flavor of the spices will penetrate deep into the meat. After brining over night, I pat them dry, apply the rub and let them marinate for few more hours. Fire up the smoker to 250 degrees and smoke them for 3-4 hours or until internal temp 180 degrees. They are great substitute for chicken wings. If your guests are tired of chicken wings, serve these instead. Everyone will be highly impressed. They go great with a tall beer as well.
For variations, try to glaze them toward the end cooking time. The glaze could be as simple as wing sauce to sweet and sour or anything you can imagine.

Post Tue Apr 06, 2004 11:39 am
Chicago SP rare
rare

Posts: 45
Location: Chicago
Also agree about brining them. And I've been very eager to try beer can turkey with the extra large can of Foster's Lager!

Good luck!

sp

Post Tue Apr 06, 2004 3:35 pm
PaulP well done
well done

Posts: 681
Location: Beautiful St. Mary's County, Maryland
I haven't tried it, but I can almost guarantee that a properly cooked beer-can turkey will be moist like a beer can chicken. The moistness is a result of the cooking technique, not the bird.
PaulP
If you don't like the food, have more wine

Post Tue Apr 06, 2004 4:48 pm
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
Pauls Right.
I've done them.
They're great.
Image

Post Tue Apr 06, 2004 8:31 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3046
Location: Atlanta-GA
I’ve never tried the Beer-Can-Turkey, but I’ve made the chicken many times. I’m sure the results will be similar.
I would like to share this new experience with everyone though. You know how some recipes call for working a flavored butter underneath the turkey skin. And the results are usually pretty good. I’ve done it many times. But after close observation, I noticed that the butter melts during the first 30 minutes of cooking. So what happens after several hour of cooking? Eventually the butter will run off and the turkey is left to dry. Since the butter have a very low melting point, it will melt very fast no matter what I do. So I went searching for something that would last long and give me a continuous basting advantage. I found that nothing work like pork fat. Yes, pork fat. I got a piece of fatback and sliced it to 1/8 of an inch slices, sprinkled them with salt, pepper and some herbs, then worked them in under the skin. This gave me several hours of automatic basting. The good thing about this method, it’s adjustable to the turkey size. If you have a large turkey and it’s going to take a longer cooking time, just slice the fat a little thicker and it will last longer. You may ask why didn’t I use bacon? Well I did, but I found bacon to be too thin and it did not last as long. Actually, it started to burn after a while. Turkey breast lacks the fat that other cuts of meat have; therefore it dries fast. Adding the pork fat fixes that problem. After all, why do we all love pork butt? Because it’s rich in pork fat!

Post Wed Apr 07, 2004 12:15 am
YardBurner BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5376
Location: Damascus, Maryland
PORK FAT RULES!!!

Oh, Um, uhh, sorry, I got carried away. never mind.

Post Thu Apr 08, 2004 11:03 pm
spfranz well done
well done

Posts: 615
Location: Minnesota

Here's a technique that I've found turns out pretty good legs. Pull the skin down to the ankle bone but don't take it off. Rub the meat with Worcestershire sauce and sprinkle with your favorite rub. Pull the skin back up and do the same thing to the outside. Toss in the smoker and cook at 200 - 225 for 3 1/2 to 4 hours or until done. Mop as they cook and/or brine to keep them moist

Scott

Image
I like vegetarians. Some of my favorite foods are vegetarians.

Post Fri Apr 09, 2004 8:50 am
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3046
Location: Atlanta-GA
Spfranz,
Pulling down the skin is a very good idea. No one eats the skin any way, this way the flavor from the spices goes right on the meat where it needs to.
Also I forgot to mention, if you’re in a hurry and you don’t want to brine the drumsticks, you could always inject them with your favorite flavor.

Post Fri Apr 09, 2004 12:26 pm
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
Wow. I really like the tips and recipes ya'll are sharing. And might I say Scott, you have some mighty fine looking legs!
Image

Post Fri Apr 09, 2004 8:50 pm
spfranz well done
well done

Posts: 615
Location: Minnesota

Gosh, thanks Bob. :oops: I've never felt prettier in my life.

Scott
I like vegetarians. Some of my favorite foods are vegetarians.

Post Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:20 am
SandRaven medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 57
Location: Rockford, IL
I've also had success making little cornish hens on small apple juice cans. I just pour out or drink halk the apple juice and refil the cans with beer or white wine.

Post Mon Apr 12, 2004 6:31 pm
Smokecoat rare
rare

Posts: 39
Location: Overland Park, KS
Can you make a beer-can turkey (or chicken, for that matter) on a smoker? Does this make sense to do a low and slow beer canner, or can you only really do it at a higher temp/shorter time? Is this worthwhile?

Thanks for the input!

Post Mon Apr 12, 2004 6:37 pm
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
Yes, definately! The only way I've cooked coke can chickens is in a smoker, both gas fired and charcoal. I cook the at a lower temperature that a grill so they take longer. If you click on my "WWW" button at the bottom of my messages you can see several photos of chickens sittin' on cans!
Image


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