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Which is cheaper? wood or briquettes

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Post Wed Mar 31, 2004 5:41 pm
smoke rare
rare

Posts: 26
Everytime I go to Wal Mart, I tell my self I am going to buy some Sam's Choice charcoal, because I have used it before and it is good, and it only costs about $5 for 20 lbs. Then I always buy a bag of mesquite wood instead.

Today I even had the charcoal in the cart before I took it out and bought the wood.

Then I got to thinking. Sure, the wood is $5 for only about 10 lbs, seemingly twice the price of briquettes, but the bag is about the same size, and either way it still takes about one chimney full for me to grill.

So if 20 lbs of briquetts and 10 lbs of lump, and 10 lbs of wood are all the same price, which one is cheaper?

Spare me the details on which one is better. I already know what I like.

Post Wed Mar 31, 2004 5:52 pm
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
Welcome to the board Smoke! We can always use a little extra smoke around here :wink:

What you're descibing sound like it's about the same price per burn. If both bags are the same size and cost the same and contain the same number of chimney's of fuel, it's a toss-up. The choice would no longer be one of economics, but of preference.

BTW, I can get Kingsford charcoal 20lbs for under $5 using a grocery store's discount card.

See you around!
Last edited by Bob-BQN on Wed Mar 31, 2004 6:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Post Wed Mar 31, 2004 6:23 pm
Guest

well now, I have to admit, there's a whole lot more air in those bags of lump or wood than there is in a bag of briquettes.

I figure out could come out ahead on the wood if I grill in the rain. That way, when the rain puts the fire out, I can dry the wood and relight it.

I wonder what would happen if I put some soggy charcoal in a food dehydrater. hmmm, would probably first have to put the black paste in ice cube trays or something.

that's a good price on the Kingsford, but I like Sam's Choice a little better. The briquettes are a little lager and harder, so no crumbles. Somebody told me that Kroger brand charcoal is nothing but wood and cornstarch. Not sure what they put in Kingsford.

That's one reason I like wood. You never have to wonder what's in it.

Thanks for the welcome Bob. Smoke was just an accident. That was my CB handle when I was a truck driver. It all had to do with a 400 Cummins in very bad shape which I tried to start on a cold morning in Wyoming. If you woke up and looked out your window, it looked like everyone in the truck stop was having an early morning barbeque.

Post Wed Mar 31, 2004 11:29 pm
hickory pete well done
well done

Posts: 403
Welcome Smoke...Hope you enjoy it here. Looking forward to reading about some of the preparations from the grill. Good luck.

Pete

Post Thu Apr 01, 2004 9:36 am
Airfoils well done
well done

Posts: 1063
I don't much differentiate between the 2 regarding cost rather than application. Depending on what I am cooking and what time frame I have or how much time I have to tend it influences my decision. If you have a mill near you, they'll likely give you wood scraps for free but if you are buying it in the bag in a store wood is more expensive.

Post Sat Apr 03, 2004 2:51 am
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
Welcome Smoke,
I bought a whole truckload of split sesasoned oak logs from a friend delivered to my house for $75. I have another friend who is offering to give me some for free.
When you can buy wood in bulk versus individually packaged bags, it comes out much cheaper.
Do you already have a firewood rack and a chainsaw? Those are "grill accessories" at my house.
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Sat Apr 03, 2004 3:56 am
smoke rare
rare

Posts: 26
Vinsect wrote:
Welcome Smoke,
I bought a whole truckload of split sesasoned oak logs from a friend delivered to my house for $75. I have another friend who is offering to give me some for free.
When you can buy wood in bulk versus individually packaged bags, it comes out much cheaper.
Do you already have a firewood rack and a chainsaw? Those are "grill accessories" at my house.

Well Vinsect, funny you should ask. I have two ricks of red oak out front. So I decided to cut enough into barbeque size chunks to grill some chicken. Fortunately there was one very small log, which I split with a wedge and small sledge hammer. Then I began to cut it into about four inch chunks.

I never made it that far. It was taking forever and I was getting cold, so I took the split logs and put them in my woodstove to heat the house up. Then I got hungry so I went out to the old Rubbermaid tub and pulled out enough W.W. Wood incorporated mesquite chunks to fill a chimney starter and started grilling.

Post Tue Apr 06, 2004 2:22 am
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
Well Smoke, You can't go wrong with Mesquite either. You can get around to using that oak another day. I do recomend cutting the bark off first though.
There are a few good posts here on using real wood. check out..
Green Wood or Dry Wood? Ginger or Mary Ann
http://www.barbecuebible.com/board/viewtopic.php?t=592

How to add charcoal
http://www.barbecuebible.com/board/viewtopic.php?t=178

Smoking Wood
http://www.barbecuebible.com/board/viewtopic.php?t=542

Moldy Wood?
http://www.barbecuebible.com/board/viewtopic.php?t=651

I hope you enjoy these posts as much as I have. If you think of any new questions ask away. Thats what makes a good post keep getting better.
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.


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