Board index Barbecue Board General Discussion Is the weber kettle 22.5" used for everyday grilling?

Is the weber kettle 22.5" used for everyday grilling?

This is the place to ask your BBQ questions, share information, and more.
brett

Hi all, ive been roaming the boards here for a while and love all the helpful info from everyone. Anyway, i decided to maybe take the plunde and get a charcoal grill. I currently have a 2 burner Propane Charbroil but want to try something else. I have a few questions though. First, is the weber kettle grill going to work for everyday for, ie..steaks, burgers,beer can chicken, basically everyything i use my LP unit for? Next, seems like the weber kettle is a big seller around here and i wondered what type of charcoal people are using? Can you use wood chips in this unit to get a smokey flavor? Any other helpful tips would be appreciated. What accessories do i need to get with it. I have to assume it doesnt come with anything, ie...charcoal holder/seperator, thermometer? cover? anything? Im going for my first beer can chicken this weekend and thought this might be nice instead of using my crummy charbroil 2 burner. Thanks all!!! i look forward to being able to try alot of new things this summer on the grill and wondered what others opinions are.

Post Tue Mar 23, 2004 3:39 pm
WeberBoy rare
rare

Posts: 26
Location: Southeast PA
First, is the weber kettle grill going to work for everyday for, ie..steaks, burgers,beer can chicken, basically everyything i use my LP unit for?


Yes - I have owned a Weber Kettle for years and use it for all of the above. The only thing you will lose from your gasser is convinence. It will take longer to light up some charcoal than fire up a gas grill. Not that it's a big problem, just wanted to let you know.

what type of charcoal people are using?


I use Kingsford only. Other use lump (natural) charcoal. I haven't used them myself, but I have heard that cheaper charcoal may burn too quick, not light, have a funny taste, etc. I think most people use Kingsford and are very happy with the results.

Can you use wood chips in this unit to get a smokey flavor?


Yes you can. Just throw them right on the hot coals.

have to assume it doesnt come with anything, ie...charcoal holder/seperator, thermometer? cover? anything?


It comes with a vinyl cover. I seem to replace mine about one a year ($10.00) (it always rips on top by the handle). I bought a gas grill thermo at Home Depot about 4 years ago for $20.00. It fits perfectly in one of the top vent holes. No drilling necessary. Charcoal holders, a hinged grate (for adding coals for longer cooks), and the tool holder are the other accessories I find helpful. You will also need a Chimney (for starting the charcoal). DO NOT USE LIGHTER FLUID!!! The chimney lights the charcoal with a couple pieces of newspaper. No lighter fluid taste on your food!! I did also get the side work table, but it isn't that conveinient. They don't make a cover that accounts for the side table so you have to take it down to cover the grill. I just never end up using it.

Take the plunge. You won't regret it. The Kettle is a great grill.

WeberBoy
Image

Post Tue Mar 23, 2004 5:29 pm
chagan well done
well done

Posts: 1350
Location: Central NJ by way of NY
I agree with everything you said there WeberBoy, except thermometer placement. I have a 22.5 inch Weber Platinum and I use nothing else. I did mount a thermometer by drilling a hole in the lid about halfway up (a little more toward the handle) I was wondering why I wasn't getting crispy skin and things seem to take alot longer to cook then they were supposed to. I also have a temperature detective thermometer with probe and have found out by comparison that the temp reading that I was getting from the mounted unit were registering about 50 degrees hotter than the temp at food level. The only thing you will be measuring by sticking a thermometer in the top vent is the temp of the hot air leaving your grill, which will be much higher than where the food is- and where the reading matters.
Image

No, it ain't burnt- it's barbecue

Post Tue Mar 23, 2004 5:42 pm
WeberBoy rare
rare

Posts: 26
Location: Southeast PA
chagan,

You are right. I should have been clearer. Heat does rise and a thermo at the lid level will register higher than the grate. When I first placed the thermo in the lid I used my probe thermo to find the temp difference from grate to lid. I just subtract the difference for a "guesstimate" of the grate temp. I know it isn't exact but it always worked for me. Having a thermo permanently mounted in the lid is convenient for me. Plus, I am too much of a wimp to drill a hole in my beloved Weber.

WeberBoy
Image

Post Tue Mar 23, 2004 5:48 pm
chagan well done
well done

Posts: 1350
Location: Central NJ by way of NY
Ah, that sounds like a plan. When I found out the difference that I was getting, I started to do the same thing. I do, however like the meter drilled into the lid. I know- it was hard for me too, I only had the grill for a couple of weeks- but I used a dremel multi tool to punch the hole, then rounded it out a bit ( just enough to get the gauge through), then I quickly applied some high temp grill paint to the raw edge. Looks good, and I haven't had any rust develop. I am thinking about buying a replacement lid and lowering the thermometer location to the correct spot. However, this will have to wait until after the rotisserie purchase. (one must set priorities!)

BTW- welcome back, haven't heard from you in quite a while.
Image

No, it ain't burnt- it's barbecue

Post Tue Mar 23, 2004 6:06 pm
WeberBoy rare
rare

Posts: 26
Location: Southeast PA
Ah, the rotisserie. That is on my short list too.

Actually, since I bought a Weber Smokey Mountain I don't take the temp on my Kettle anymore anyway. I did notice that since I took the thermo out of the vent and can now close it, the coals extinguish a lot quicker (duh). Then I can reuse the leftover coals. That saves me a lot of $.

Where are you in NJ? I am originally from NJ (Born in East Orange. Grew up in Warren County). I just spent Saturday at my friend house in Brick.

WeberBoy
Image

Post Wed Mar 24, 2004 11:45 am
chagan well done
well done

Posts: 1350
Location: Central NJ by way of NY
I live in Hillsborough, and work in Flemington. Aside from that, I don't know my way around much. :shock:
Image

No, it ain't burnt- it's barbecue

Post Wed Mar 24, 2004 4:17 pm
brett

just ordered a blue 22" kettle from amazon. Free SHIPPING right now. Anyway, thanks for all the tips everyone. Hey, i stopped by the local home depot and was looking at it a little closer, is the cooking grate that it comes with good. it didnt feel that heavy 'duty' Also, i noticed that there are actually 2 grates, a lower and upper. Whats the difference? Dont the coals acutally go directly on the bottom of the grill? where the silver 'fan' type blades are? Thanks again for all the tips.

there really seems to be alot of great cooking ideas out here. Cant wait to try some of them out.

Post Wed Mar 24, 2004 4:21 pm
chagan well done
well done

Posts: 1350
Location: Central NJ by way of NY
The grates are very good. And the bottom grate is where the coals go. You'll be satisfied with your purchase, I'm sure. Good luck. What are you gonna make first?
Image

No, it ain't burnt- it's barbecue

Post Wed Mar 24, 2004 4:38 pm
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
Brett, welcome to the board (a little late!).

As chagan mention the lower grate is where your coals go. The grate allows for airflow. If you set the coals directly in the bottom they would smolder and not get very hot. The ash drops through the grate into the bottom where the silver 'fan' type blades, you mentioned, are. You turn the blades to push the ash, which has collect in the bottom, into the catch pan underneath. They make cleanup a lot easier. Hope this helps.

Feel free to sign up and join us.
Last edited by Bob-BQN on Thu Mar 25, 2004 12:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Image

Post Thu Mar 25, 2004 12:06 pm
Brett raw
raw

Posts: 2
Location: Flat Rock, Michigan
Thanks for the tips. I guess i should have known better about where the charcoal should go,but ive never cooked w/charcoal before so this should be fun to mess with. Someone asked what my first thing was going to be, i actually just picked up a chicken and was going to do a beer can saturday. Anyway, since this kettle probably wont show up in time i guess ill be trying it on my gas turd. thanks again for all the tips and i look forward to learing more from everyone. Thanks,

Post Thu Mar 25, 2004 2:40 pm
hickory pete well done
well done

Posts: 403
Brett...Glad you signed up with us. There's a lot here...explore the site. Looking forward to hearing how that Beer-Can Chicken turned out. Steven's "Beer-Can Chicken" book will give you some great ideas. Good luck. :)

Pete

Post Fri Mar 26, 2004 12:25 pm
Airfoils well done
well done

Posts: 1063
Welcome Brett. Applause to you for buying yourself the best grill known to man! I'm sure you'll get lots of enjoyment out of it and on your way to accessorising your Weber in short order. Plan on your Weber to last 10+ years easily and find out who carries lump charcoal in your area. The first accessory I would suggest would be a chimney starter. For there, it's all what you want to do. Lots of good advice for you in this thread.

Post Fri Mar 26, 2004 1:12 pm
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
Airfoils wrote:
Applause to you for buying yourself the best grill known to man!


Now thats a bold statement! :shock:
Image

Post Fri Mar 26, 2004 1:18 pm
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
Since he didn't say men, he probably was referring to himself :D
Image

Next

Return to General Discussion

cron