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Chicken and the indirect method

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Post Tue Mar 23, 2004 2:40 pm
doc raw
raw

Posts: 1
Steven, I'm a professor at Clemson University and am regarded as the expert pit boss by many of my colleques, this is due to all of your fantastic books! Thank you tremendously! I have a question, is it possible to use the indirect method for barbequeing bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts? If so, should they be covered with rub and moped during the process or do you recomend another method. I've done numerous beer can chickens to great success, just wandered if the same process would be as effective with several breasts. If this is possible, can you recommend a recipe from "BBQ USA" or "How to Grill" that would be appropriate? Thanks much! Dr. Chris :?:
Tiger Town's Barbeque Ph.D.

Post Tue Mar 23, 2004 3:43 pm
WeberBoy rare
rare

Posts: 26
Location: Southeast PA
is it possible to use the indirect method for barbequeing bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts?


Yes. I would direct grill first to crisp the skin and then cook indirectly to finish cooking the meat. That is a great way to cook the chicken without burning the skin.

Should they be covered with rub and moped during the process or do you recomend another method?


Yes to the rub, no on the mop. Others may disagree but it think if you want crispy skin, don't mop.

Good Luck!
WeberBoy
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Post Tue Mar 23, 2004 6:52 pm
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
Welcome to the board Chris!

Before the beer can chicken can along, pit bosses cooked a lot of halved chickens. Though I haven't tried it, the bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts should cook well using indirect method. Since it's not steaming on a can, you may wish to brine the chicken breasts the night before barbequing for added moisture. I would also recommend rubbing them a few hours before cooking to flavor the meat.

Chicken under a brick from "How to Grill" is a good recipe but it’s not indirect as you requested. To date, I’ve cooked chicken pieces using only the direct method.

Try a few before attempting to impress the faculty and let us know how they turn out.
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Post Tue Mar 23, 2004 9:05 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3039
Location: Atlanta-GA
I would go with the above recommendation, and I would add one thing. Chicken breast tend to be dry (it does not have built-in self basting fat); Therefore, I would baste the chicken breasts through out the cooking time. If you want crispy skin, just keep the skin side down while basting. The skin will baste that side anyway. Trust me on this. We eat chicken at my house 6 days/week, and I’ve tried every trick in the book. The only thing that keeps the chicken breast nice and moist is continuous basting.

Post Tue Mar 23, 2004 11:33 pm
YardBurner BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5371
Location: Damascus, Maryland
I agree with the above techniques and have good success starting skin down direct, flipping to indirect with a baste and then finishing skin down direct to crisp it up.

Brining helps for smaller breasts but, todays larger breasts seem to hold up ok. Most folks tend to overcook on the grill and the carry over heat makes the meat dry. Once the juices run almost clear baste it and flip it to direct for just a minute or two (HIGH) and take it off. Keep it loosely covered with foil and it should be moist and still crispy. Just don't let it steam after removing it from the grill. Unless you want the infamous rubber chicken!

Boneless, even with skin on are a different thing altogether. I almost always brine even it it's for only a short time while the grill is firing up. (Poor planning). Sear top or meaty side down direct, flip direct for a min or so and move to indirect. Cover witha small foil roasting pan, leaving the grill lid open until almost done then return to the direct heat side at a lower setting for final saucing or basting. Again don't let it steam after removing. A 200 degree oven will hold it tented with foil, not wrapped, for 20 to 30 minutes without too much ill effect..

Post Wed Mar 24, 2004 9:34 am
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
With the exception of beer can style, I do all chicken direct heat but low flame. For me cooking chicken is like a dance, you have to keep moving (and not step on your partners toes) Unlike a steak I rotate/flip my chicken often so it cooks through from both sides and still gets that great crispy skin. I always use either a rub or a baste or spray. Most commonly the vinegar/butter/garlic salt spray I talked about in the "Standard Chicken with a Flair" post.

So yes it can be done, just go slow, avoid flare ups, and experiment with what you put on it.

Good Luck Doc! and Welcome aboard! (Just don't go correcting my grammer and spelling ok?)
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Post Wed Mar 24, 2004 3:05 pm
hickory pete well done
well done

Posts: 403
Welcome Doc..you came to the right place for ideas. Steven's books really do make a difference for me. I grill chicken in the same manner that Grand Scale mentioned. Experimenting, I feel, is the key to finding what you may prefer. Try the search function at the top of the page to locate the threads that may interest you.

Glad to hear that the Universities are barbequeing....that's a big step from the days that my son talks about cooking chicken soup in the coffee pot at MSU. Good luck.

Pete

Post Wed Mar 24, 2004 3:31 pm
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
Oh man I BBQ'd all the time at college, I think thats one reason my wife stuck with me...good food!

If I'd known that my profs we're q'ers too I may have payed more attention in class!
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