Board index Barbecue Board General Discussion Moldy Wood?

Moldy Wood?

This is the place to ask your BBQ questions, share information, and more.
Post Sat Feb 21, 2004 3:28 am
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
Hey all you hardwood smokers out there...
I bought a truckload of seasoned oak this morning for my smoker. Some of it was moldy. I intend to cut away the bark and most of the moldy sections. Will a little mold on some of my wood cause any problems with my food?
A great deal of it may burn off in the chimney starter anyway.
I can't wait to try my first run with all hardwood smoke.
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Sat Feb 21, 2004 10:04 am
Airfoils well done
well done

Posts: 1063
I don't think it's a problem. Mold is a living thing and I doubt it survives the heat.

Post Sat Feb 21, 2004 12:03 pm
dkirn well done
well done

Posts: 388
Location: St. Louis, MO
I will remove any mold from any wood that I have - I do not know if it causes any problems but mold does not sound good to me so I remove it.
Image

Post Sat Feb 21, 2004 2:07 pm
Airfoils well done
well done

Posts: 1063
If he has large fungal blooms of it maybe but I wouldn't go as far as to get out the wire brush and it doesn't sound like that's the case in this instance. If it's that much of a problem, just buy it in the bag or find a mill nearby that uses a de-barker. I think he'll find his bigger chore is keeping a truck load of wood in good condition depending on how long he plans on having it.

Post Sat Feb 21, 2004 8:56 pm
Craig medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 63
Location: North Carolina
Hello fellas, what's up? This question is right up my alley. DO NOT cook, smoke, or otherwise with any fungi, moldy wood! You get some unique, off flavors if you do.
Trim all funky wood off before using. You can use wood with a little fungus on the bark........no problem. But, if the wood has started to rot, or has mold on the wood itself, put it in the heater and get warm. I don't know much, but I know green wood. Hope this helps.
Craig

Post Sat Feb 21, 2004 11:07 pm
ThrRoff well done
well done

Posts: 999
Location: Washington, DC

I will second Craig’s admonition. Get rid of moldy wood. Some oak I had stored in feed bags got wet and then moldy. Unfortunately, I used it for some chicken, and the smoke taste was terrible. The remaining bags went directly to the dump.
Image

Post Sun Feb 22, 2004 1:30 am
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
I figured Craig would probably have some good input on this one.
I'll probably be slicing a lot of this wood into chunks that will fit in my chimney starter so it shouldn't be a problem to toss the moldy stuff.
I figure I can use some of the moldy stuff for my fireplace.
Thanks to everyone for your replys.
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Sun Feb 22, 2004 11:11 am
Airfoils well done
well done

Posts: 1063
Craig wrote:
You can use wood with a little fungus on the bark........no problem. But, if the wood has started to rot, or has mold on the wood itself, put it in the heater and get warm.


Yeah, it depends on the degree we're talking about and his post wasn't very specific. When he mentioned it I didn't envision rotting fungi ridden wood but rather a few flecks of gray here and there that hasn't compromised the wood itself. If it doesn't look like even when burned down to coals will help then don't use it. In the end it's a matter of your best judgement. So, it's a matter of degrees.

Post Mon Feb 23, 2004 3:33 am
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
Another idea I thought of would be to test my smoke by toasting a piece of bread before throwing on a good piece of meat.
If the toast tastes foul build a new fire from scratch.
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Mon Feb 23, 2004 9:13 pm
dkirn well done
well done

Posts: 388
Location: St. Louis, MO
Vincent -

The one thing to keep in mind is that the smoke flavor will stay in your smoker (that is why older smokers make the best BBQ, and why you don't clean them out like you would a regular grill) and it is hard if not almost impossible to get rid of some fowl smoke tastes.
Image

Post Wed Feb 25, 2004 1:30 am
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
Well tonight I gave that oak a shot. I didn't use any pieces that looked moldy and I got great flavor and good heat.
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Thu Feb 26, 2004 9:12 am
Steven Grilling Guru
Grilling Guru

Posts: 281

I'd use the moldy pieces to build the base fire, letting it burn down to embers. That should burn away the mold.
I wouldn't toss moldy chunks on the fire to generate smoke while the food is on the grill or smoker.
Does anyone else out there have experience with this?
Happy grilling.
SR

Post Thu Feb 26, 2004 10:05 am
Airfoils well done
well done

Posts: 1063
I agree with Steve. I think if some of you inspected every piece of wood under a microscope you might never use wood again and that would be a tragedy. IT's a matter of degrees as I said. I've used wood that's had some mild mold growth on the surface but the wood itself wasn't compromised or rotted nor did it have large fungal growths. It burned down fine and didn't impart any strange tastes. For smoke wood, I always use chunks from a store bought bag (on very rare occasion chips) so it's never been an issue.

Post Thu Feb 26, 2004 8:36 pm
ThrRoff well done
well done

Posts: 999
Location: Washington, DC

I can add experience to Seven's request. Moldy wood for the smoke source seems to impart a very harsh taste, and I will not use it again. I made that mistake with the chicken I mentioned above. It certainly seems logical that one could use it to warm the smoker and letting it burn to embers.
Image

Post Fri Apr 30, 2004 9:00 am
Mog raw
raw

Posts: 3
Thanks for the replies. The wood goes to the dump and I got to the bag of hickory chunks.


Return to General Discussion