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Seasoning New Gas Grills

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Post Mon Feb 09, 2004 4:53 pm
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
Hey, I just bought one of those $109 Thermos grills from home depot. It's the same grill as the $169 Char-Broil except the Thermos comes with a sideburner and the Char-Broil doesn't. They're a limited time deal so get em while they last.
Anyway, the manual says to burn em in for about 15 minutes to cure the paint and parts.
My question is ... would it also be a good idea to coat all the internal parts with peanut oil like I would cure my smoker?
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Mon Feb 09, 2004 5:56 pm
YardBurner BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5376
Location: Damascus, Maryland
I don't think it will make a difference on the cast alluminim. Grill temps get to high and the coating would just burn off.

On a smoker the coating's purpose is to seal the unfinished steel and inhibit rust.

Post Mon Feb 09, 2004 6:24 pm
MReynolds well done
well done

Posts: 394
Location: Missouri, St. Peters
My Charbroil came with a thin coat of oil on the inside surfaces on the burner tents. Not wanting to take a chance, I did the burn for 15 minutes before ever seasoning the grill surface. Cool thing was that the grill really gets up to temp with those three burners going full blast. Thermometer was going arount to 600 or better!
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PETA - People Eat Tasty Animals

Post Tue Feb 10, 2004 1:26 am
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
So you coat the smoker because it doesn't usually get up to the high temps that would burn off rust otherwise?
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Tue Feb 10, 2004 1:00 pm
YardBurner BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5376
Location: Damascus, Maryland
Some of the coating near the opening to the firebox will burn off obviously. I guess it just gives the seasoning process a head start.

Once you've smoked a couple of loads they kind of take care of themselves.

Just don't let any drippings stay in the bottom too long. Alot of the liquid is vinegar from your mop and is very acidic.

Post Tue Feb 10, 2004 9:36 pm
Rick rare
rare

Posts: 47
Location: Oregon
I have always gotten right with the program and after the initial curing recommended by the manufacturer, cook a beef roast with some fat on it. This will cure things up right!!!

Post Tue Feb 10, 2004 10:04 pm
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
What exactly is the purpose in curing? Rust prevention? and is cast iron cookware cured for the same reasons?
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Tue Feb 10, 2004 10:26 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3046
Location: Atlanta-GA
There are several reasons for curing:
1. It prevents rust
2. It prevents staining
3. It give the metal a natural non-stick property
4. In some cases it contributes to the flavor of food
5. And I just think it gives the grill a better look (if you care about that).

Post Tue Feb 10, 2004 11:11 pm
hickory pete well done
well done

Posts: 403
I followed the manufacturers recommendation to burn the grill in on high for 15 minutes as soon as I assembled it. I let it cool down, and grilled the following day....no problems.

Pete

Post Tue Feb 10, 2004 11:14 pm
YardBurner BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5376
Location: Damascus, Maryland
As for seasoning grills, obviously there are many opinions.

For the cast iron cookware go right to the horses mouth.

www.lodgemfg.com

Who else could answer any possible question re: cast iron.

Kind of a cool site to explore.

Steven should add this to his list of favorite links.

Cast iron works well with all of his books Mexican, grilling and especially the BIG FLAVOR BOOK.

Good quality and properly seasoned cast iron can cook at a lower heat level and with less oil than almost any other cookware.

Buy a high end nonstick skillet and drop a C-note or more. Have a "friend" use a carving fork to stir the scrambled eggs and throw it away,

Wih cast iron if the same thing happens you run it on the self cleaning cycle of your oven, reseason it and pass it on to your grandchildren!

Post Thu Feb 12, 2004 12:49 am
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
Thanks for the input. That Lodge Cast Iron site is cool. I'll have to check that out in more detail.
Why do they say NEVER put cast iron in the dishwasher? Does it permanently ruin it?
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Thu Feb 12, 2004 6:48 am
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3046
Location: Atlanta-GA
The dishwasher will strip the cast iron from all seasoning and causes it to rust. For every day cleaning, try the salt method. Place a generous amount of coarse salt in the skillet and heat it up, then let cool and whip it clean.
Also try this sight for cool cast iron stuff:
http://www.pebbleshop.com/store/castiron.html

Post Thu Feb 12, 2004 9:41 pm
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
So the dishwasher doesn't permanently ruin it. It just has to be re-seasoned. right?
I'd love to have a set of fajita skillets. I just tried typing "fajita skillet" in eBay and there are plenty. Anybody know of any other good sources?
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Thu Feb 12, 2004 10:09 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3046
Location: Atlanta-GA


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