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Beef on a grill

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Post Fri Jan 16, 2004 5:20 am
Craig medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 63
Location: North Carolina
Hello everyone, I've been away for awhile, and appear to have missed much. It is great to see such an interest in our craft (art?) of grilling. Grand Scale, your posts are a scream, I've enjoyed reading them along with everyone elses.
To the point, I have long been a griller of pork....: butts, picinics, hams, ribs, loins, you name it. I now have the task of grilling a twelve pound BEEF sirloin tip, whole. Can anyone tell me if the same drill of: rub, slow and low and mop every 45min ala pork shoulder applys here, or is a different method needed? Being a native of eastern NC, we all have pork worked out, but I think maybe the Texans among others got the beef down.

Thank you all, and happy grilling!
Craig

Post Fri Jan 16, 2004 8:25 am
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
Welcome back Craig and thanks for the compliment.
In my experience with big cuts of beef thats right how I've done it. I favor rubs with either horseraddish or mustrad and loads of garlic and pepper. But thats just me. Just confirm your internal temps to make sure you get the right doneness that you're looking for. But take that at face value...I'm not Texan. (Insert wiseass comment here)
Good Luck.
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Post Fri Jan 16, 2004 3:20 pm
PaulP well done
well done

Posts: 681
Location: Beautiful St. Mary's County, Maryland
As usual, I'll jump in completely without benefit of the thought process...

Unlike a briskit, Sirloin Tip is a pretty lean and tender cut, and so may not do well in a true low and slow cook (225 - 250 degrees, cook forever.) I'd say put on your favorite rub, then grill indirect at about 325 - 350 degrees until it reaches the desired level of doneness. Let it rest before carving, and remember that it will continue to cook while resting, so pull it about 10 degrees early.

IMHO, all this raving about briskit is the Texans' way of getting everybody else to buy the inedible parts of the cow, so they can have the good cuts for themselves.

PaulP
PaulP
If you don't like the food, have more wine

Post Fri Jan 16, 2004 3:47 pm
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
I believe PaulP has done a pretty good job of describing how to cook Prime Beef. I wouldn't cook it as long as a brisket (10-14 Hours) either. But my friend Paul, Ooooo, ooooo, OOOoo, OOooo, ooooo. You've missed the mark when it comes to brisket. Although not a PRIME grade of beef, it is not to be under estimated. When properly trimmed and cooked it is some mighty fine eatin'. :wink:
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Post Fri Jan 16, 2004 5:06 pm
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
I like London Broil too and as much as I enjoy it I've always considered it a rather crappy cut. If it weren't you wouldn't need to marinate it or tenderize it as you do. But prime or not good eats is good eats. If Paul doesn't like brisket thats fine. That just leaves more for everybody else. Lets not get in an argument over which cut is best. They all come from the same cow after all. If we're going to argue anything lets go back to the whole gas vs. charcoal issue. :twisted:
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Post Fri Jan 16, 2004 5:18 pm
ThrRoff well done
well done

Posts: 999
Location: Washington, DC

Beef to me is like wine, cheese and bourban --- Never met any I didn't like. Yep lets argue gas or charcoal....... :lol:

Post Fri Jan 16, 2004 5:42 pm
hickory pete well done
well done

Posts: 403
Gas vs. Charcoal again? :shock: :shock:

Post Fri Jan 16, 2004 6:05 pm
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
So since I have both ... does that mean I can argue off-line!
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Post Fri Jan 16, 2004 6:43 pm
YardBurner BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5376
Location: Damascus, Maryland
Don't forget the original London broil was made from flank steak. As more people used it and skirt steak to make fajitas the price increased and the meat industry slipped in a different, cheaper and less tender cut.

Most important thing with either cut is to carve it properly across the grain.

And don't forget to marinate the chef.

Post Fri Jan 16, 2004 9:24 pm
Craig medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 63
Location: North Carolina
I posted a reply and then hit the wrong button. On the forum, a few notches above my post it says "Guest" and thanks. thats my post. It has info regarding my take on Gas vs. Charcoal.
Once again, thank you for the tips on theTip.
Craig

Post Sun Jan 18, 2004 9:31 am
stripegrill medium
medium

Posts: 104
Location: St. Charles, IL
Bob-BQN, since you have both that means you must argue with yourself. Please let us know who wins! :lol:

Post Sun Jan 18, 2004 9:47 am
hickory pete well done
well done

Posts: 403
He can only win if one of himself gives in first :roll: :shock:

Post Sun Jan 18, 2004 4:20 pm
chagan well done
well done

Posts: 1350
Location: Central NJ by way of NY
I just bought my new methane grill- it is bean and beer powered.
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No, it ain't burnt- it's barbecue

Post Sun Jan 18, 2004 9:27 pm
Craig medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 63
Location: North Carolina
Thanks for the help!! The sirloin roast was mesquite smoked at 350 for an hour and a half and then finished in the oven because typhoon force winds took my heat away. I sliced it up thin and served with a horseradish sauce and mustard. Kudos for the help!!!!!!! The only thing left was the platter and after a few beers, that wasn't to safe either.
" How 'bout them Patriots! "
Great Grilling!!!!!!
Craig




P.S. I still say go prehistoric.......... WOOD BABY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
JUST DO THE WOOD.

Post Mon Jan 19, 2004 7:58 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3056
Location: Atlanta-GA
Any Gas Grill can be easily converted to a charcoal grill; all you need is a foil pan. This way you can have the best of both worlds. Let me know if you need an explanation on how to set it up.
Happy Grilling.


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