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Bulk Charcoal VS Hardwoods and Lump Charcoal

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estetica91

I have a Weber propane start charcoal kettle grill. I've been using bulk charcioal from Home Depot. Any recomondations on what's better to use? Lump charcoal or hardwoods? And what woods are better than others, and is lump charcoal betterr than thegeneric bag stuff

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Thanks Don

Airfoils well done
well done

Posts: 1063
estetica91 wrote:
I have a Weber propane start charcoal kettle grill. I've been using bulk charcioal from Home Depot. Ant recomondations on what's better to use? Lump charcoal or hardwoods? And what woods are better than others, and is lump charcoal betterr than thegeneric bag stuff

/
Thanks Don


The Performer is a fine grill. Kudos to you for making such an excellent choice to create your masterpieces. :)

I use hardwood lump or straight wood when grilling. When smoking I use briquets because they burn slower and longer and toss soaked chunks on. People say there isn't much difference between gas and charcoal but I've yet to hear anyone make the same claim about lump or straight wood, probably because gas doesn't have a prayer in comparison. As far as what wood is best, I'd say whatever is abundant in your area and cheap. Just be sure it's a hardwood. Beyond that, it's personal prefference. Wood will give you a hotter fire than any other fuel source available for the grill so if heat is you goal, wood is your choice. Besides, nature intended meat to be cooked over a real fire not petroleum products. :lol:

(ducking the ensuing gas griller onslaught) :lol:

Post Mon Jan 05, 2004 10:09 pm
Steven Grilling Guru
Grilling Guru

Posts: 252

Nothing beats natural hard wood for grilling (incomparable smoke flavor), but lump charcoal comes close. The latter cooks hot and evenly, with none of the acrid chemical flavor you sometimes get w/ briquettes. Lump charcoal is quick and easy to light.

If you want to try grilling with wood, buy wood chunks at your local hardware or grill store. Light them in a chimney starter as you would charcoal. When burned down to embers, start grilling.

Just remember, wood burns more quickly than charcoal, so you'll probably have to replenish the chunks after 30 minutes.

Happy grilling!

Steven Raichlen

Post Tue Jan 06, 2004 12:18 am
ThrRoff well done
well done

Posts: 999
Location: Washington, DC

How can one add something after the guru has spoken. But, I will only add that the first time I used real lump charcoal I was shocked how hot and fast it burned, so be careful and watch your fire closely until you are used to it. I wouldn't use anything but hard wood or lump charcoal now.

Post Thu Jan 08, 2004 2:17 am
dkirn well done
well done

Posts: 388
Location: St. Louis, MO
Lump charcoal does burn fast, in my smoker I start with about 4 chimney starters full of lump charcoal and then add in logs from then on. I found that it was easier to start everything with the lump first and then add the wood on top.

Post Tue Jan 13, 2004 12:22 am
spfranz well done
well done

Posts: 615
Location: Minnesota

I've always used a combination of hardwoods and natural lump charcoal. However, I have about a hundred pounds of extruded coconut charcoal coming from the Kamado company. From everything I've heard on that forum, it's suppose to be amazing stuff. I'll let you know how it turns out.

Scott
I like vegetarians. Some of my favorite foods are vegetarians.

Post Tue Jan 13, 2004 11:11 am
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
I've never heard of extruded coconut charcoal. Let us know how that goes, it sounds interesting.
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Post Wed Jan 14, 2004 12:17 am
dkirn well done
well done

Posts: 388
Location: St. Louis, MO
Coconut charcoal seems interesting - let us know how it works and where to get some!

Post Wed Jan 14, 2004 11:38 am
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
The stuff looks different than anything I've ever seen:

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Here is the page they sell it on: http://www.kamado.com/New_Kamado_Charcoal.htm
It gives a description of how it’s made and the price.
Image

Post Wed Jan 14, 2004 6:27 pm
spfranz well done
well done

Posts: 615
Location: Minnesota

The Kamado site also has a forum and there has been a discussion there. The Naked Whiz has a lump database and ratings for all of them and he recently tested out this particular charcoal. You can read about it at http://www.nakedwhiz.com/lumpdatabase/lumpbag32.htm

His test produced a white/grey ash that nobody else seems to have seen. The speculation is that it was do to a high temp cook with no food on the grill.

Looking forward to trying this stuff out.

Scott
I like vegetarians. Some of my favorite foods are vegetarians.

Post Wed Jan 14, 2004 10:51 pm
ThrRoff well done
well done

Posts: 999
Location: Washington, DC

Extruded coconut charcoal sounds like it needs a Flux-capacitor.

Seriously, I will also await a report on the results.

Post Tue Feb 24, 2004 5:33 pm
spfranz well done
well done

Posts: 615
Location: Minnesota

Forgot that someone had asked for a post once I tried this stuff, sorry for the delay. I have used the extruded coconut charcoal and the discussion on the Kamado forum pretty much nailed it on the head.

It's a little tougher to get lit (I used 4 sheets of newspaper in the chimney) but once it gets going, it burns hot and it burns clean. It's nice to have good lump charcoal that comes in standard size pieces as well. I have 12 more boxes in the garage so I'm set for a little while anyway.

Scott
I like vegetarians. Some of my favorite foods are vegetarians.

Post Fri Feb 27, 2004 1:37 am
thumper rare
rare

Posts: 11
Location: Airdrie, Alberta
If there are others surfing this thread that are contemplating charcoal, I recently went back to charcoal briquettes for the first time in about 20 years.

Did a couple of bbq's, but the revelation in these cases was the hickory smoke. I found the briquettes did not burn that well, lots of ash. For my third try I picked up a bag of lump charcoal (same mfg as the briquettes) and did a boneless pork shoulder.

The difference was not subtle! The lump was easier to light, no acrid chemical aroma, seemed to burn hotter, and the results were terrific. Far less ash. I don't want to go back to briquettes - maybe there are better mfg's than the one I tried but we have limited selection here.

Steven's comments above were bang on.

Post Sat Feb 28, 2004 12:24 pm
chagan well done
well done

Posts: 1350
Location: Central NJ by way of NY
I use brickets most of the time for ease of use and availablility. The only brand I will buy is Kingsford. However, I did get some MatchLight not too long ago when I was in a rush and Kingsford could not be found. Anyone ever start up a full batch of MatchLight in a chimney starter? :lol: Talk about a pyrotechnic show, I thought the neighbors would call the fire dept- flames where shooting 4-5 feet over the top of my chimney. I will snatch up some natural lump if I can find it when hotter temperatures are desired. I agree with Spfranz on the uniform sizes- that is the only thing I dislike about lump- inconsistancy in size. The smaller pieces usually just fall through the grate and, so, I end up using more that I wanted to. Maybe this coconut thing is the answer.
Image

No, it ain't burnt- it's barbecue


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