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Best Way To Make The Perfect Beef Ribs & Burger

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CharGirl raw
raw

Posts: 8
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Last year I remember barbequing chicken using rib n chicken sauce and beef ribs using montreal steak seasoning with pecan wood chip. Everybody loved it even my brother, this year I want to make the perfect beef ribs with burgers any suggestions which wood chip or sauce would be good for both? :)
Char-Griller Outlaw

ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
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Posts: 7601
Location: Stoughton, WI
It's tough to go wrong with any kind of wood when it comes to beef but I really like oak or a mix of oak and a fruit wood like apple or cherry.

I've never had Montreal seasoning on beef ribs but if you like it on other meats it'll definitely be good on burgers. If you make your own make a little bit without salt and mix it into the ground beef and let it cure for a day before you make the burgers.

For sauces, maybe try 2 or 3 different varieties to see which you like best. Baste some of the ribs with the different sauces and serve some of the ribs unsauced with the sauce on the side.

Sounds like your brother might be kind of a picky eater! :lol:

CharGirl raw
raw

Posts: 8
Location: Toronto, Ontario
ScreamingChicken wrote:
It's tough to go wrong with any kind of wood when it comes to beef but I really like oak or a mix of oak and a fruit wood like apple or cherry.

I've never had Montreal seasoning on beef ribs but if you like it on other meats it'll definitely be good on burgers. If you make your own make a little bit without salt and mix it into the ground beef and let it cure for a day before you make the burgers.

For sauces, maybe try 2 or 3 different varieties to see which you like best. Baste some of the ribs with the different sauces and serve some of the ribs unsauced with the sauce on the side.

Sounds like your brother might be kind of a picky eater! :lol:


Thanks ScreamingChicken for the suggestions especially with the burgers as I have never barbequed burgers before. Sounds good I will try it this year with my nieces and brother. Yeah my brother was a line cook in a restaurant so he is picky, pleasing him is a challenge. :lol: :bbq:
Char-Griller Outlaw

CharredGriller User avatar
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Posts: 5918
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
Three other favorite woods of mine for smoking are maple, hickory and mesquite. Maple is more subtle than either hickory or mesquite but all go well with beef (or just about anything).

Montreal steak spice is one of my favorites and I always have a big jar handy. I've used it on burgers and on beef ribs many times with good results. I've only mixed it into burger meat a few times but I like it as well. I mix about 1 to 2 tablespoons into the meat and then let it rest in the fridge for an hour or two because this rehydrates the dried onion and garlic that are in Montreal steak seasoning.

As for sauce, on beef I use sauces that are less sweet than the ones I use on pork and chicken as it goes better with the taste.
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

phillyjazz well done
well done

Posts: 2982
Location: Philly

I love Mesquite for grilling. Burns HOT and gives lots of flavour quickly. I rarely use it to smoke, as it can sometimes be bitter.
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Grill Dome ceramic / Ducane Affinity 4200 gasser/ Concrete pit
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CharredGriller User avatar
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Posts: 5918
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
phillyjazz wrote:
I love Mesquite for grilling. Burns HOT and gives lots of flavour quickly. I rarely use it to smoke, as it can sometimes be bitter.


I keep mesquite in some smoking mixes but I use it sparingly because of that. A little bit in the mix adds a different flavor without being bitter.

But as you mentioned it's great for cooking over. It also works great in a smoker box or pouch for adding flavor when you're grilling. I use the straight chips or chunks over charcoal or a foil pouch over gas.
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

CharGirl raw
raw

Posts: 8
Location: Toronto, Ontario
CharredGriller wrote:
Three other favorite woods of mine for smoking are maple, hickory and mesquite. Maple is more subtle than either hickory or mesquite but all go well with beef (or just about anything).

Montreal steak spice is one of my favorites and I always have a big jar handy. I've used it on burgers and on beef ribs many times with good results. I've only mixed it into burger meat a few times but I like it as well. I mix about 1 to 2 tablespoons into the meat and then let it rest in the fridge for an hour or two because this rehydrates the dried onion and garlic that are in Montreal steak seasoning.

As for sauce, on beef I use sauces that are less sweet than the ones I use on pork and chicken as it goes better with the taste.


Thanks CharredGriller for the suggestion with the hamburgers.

For the wood chips, I was thinking of Hickory, Mesquite, Cherry or JD wood chips. But since I really don't even know much about the scent or flavor that the wood chips would give off I'll just buy all.

Sauces for the beef ribs I would like to try is Western Smokehouse.

What I am confused about is which wood chip would go good with all three chicken, beef ribs and hamburger. :?
Last edited by CharGirl on Sat Mar 22, 2014 5:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Char-Griller Outlaw

CharGirl raw
raw

Posts: 8
Location: Toronto, Ontario
phillyjazz wrote:
I love Mesquite for grilling. Burns HOT and gives lots of flavour quickly. I rarely use it to smoke, as it can sometimes be bitter.


Thank you Phillyjazz,
I hear so much good about Mesquite but believe it or not I don't have a clue what it smells like, I am a little embarrassed. :oops:
Same with Cherry and JD wood chips so I plan on buying them all.

Especially thanks for this tip, I didn't know that Mesquite gives off flavour "quickly". :D :thumbup:
Char-Griller Outlaw

phillyjazz well done
well done

Posts: 2982
Location: Philly

I tend to buy "chunks" of wood for smoking (hickory and fruit) but CHIPS of Mesquite... A nice hot flame for searing, and a pretty good shot of distinctive smoke flavor. Mesquite is quite aromatic, so IMO can be overkill for smoking.
- Phillyjazz -

Grill Dome ceramic / Ducane Affinity 4200 gasser/ Concrete pit
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jstewart well done
well done

Posts: 955
Location: Simi Valley, CA
CharGirl wrote:

What I am confused about is which wood chip would go good with all three chicken, beef ribs and hamburger. :?


That would be an interesting combination. Since I'm from South Texas, I personally would go with mesquite (that's what I grew up with), but it can be rather strong for those not accustomed to it. I've used cherry for chicken and hamburger, just not sure how it would work with beef ribs. Have you thought about using oak?
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CharGirl raw
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Posts: 8
Location: Toronto, Ontario
jstewart wrote:
CharGirl wrote:

What I am confused about is which wood chip would go good with all three chicken, beef ribs and hamburger. :?


That would be an interesting combination. Since I'm from South Texas, I personally would go with mesquite (that's what I grew up with), but it can be rather strong for those not accustomed to it. I've used cherry for chicken and hamburger, just not sure how it would work with beef ribs. Have you thought about using oak?


No one in my family including me is accustom to Mesquite, so I am thinking of using it another time when I can experiment.
For the family event, Cherry for the Chicken and Hamburgers and JD or Hickory for the Beef rib. Or Pecan for the Chicken and JD or Hickory for the Hamburger and Beef ribs.

I think the Jack Daniels wood chips is oak from the aging barrels, otherwise no I haven't thought of that. Also what I just noticed is that none of the stores carries oak wood or wood chips either.
Char-Griller Outlaw

CharGirl raw
raw

Posts: 8
Location: Toronto, Ontario
phillyjazz wrote:
I tend to buy "chunks" of wood for smoking (hickory and fruit) but CHIPS of Mesquite... A nice hot flame for searing, and a pretty good shot of distinctive smoke flavor. Mesquite is quite aromatic, so IMO can be overkill for smoking.


I think the best thing is to use the wood chips in the last 20 minutes with the beef ribs and chicken.

I am going to experiment one day with Mesquite chips with a few hamburgers, quarter legs and with half of a beef rib and see how it goes. :bbq:
Char-Griller Outlaw

JPET medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 94
Location: LOS ANGELES
In regards to wood, you can use any type you want. Red oak, white oak, cherry, maple, apple, pear, pecan,
mesquite, or hickory. I prefer the fruit woods for the fowls, and white oak for red meat. I like a light dose of mesquite
or red oak for pork. I never use olive wood because I feel it leaves a film on the meat, and the taste is off. Same goes
for fig wood ( I have several trees that I trim all the time).

Of course any wood smoke on any thing your smoking is better than no wood at all ( never olive or fig ).

Sauce, make your own. Ketchup, molasses, red vinegar, all the standard spices, salt and garlic you want, cola,
honey, red cherry juice, mustard, and some hoisin sauce. The amount of each you put in are up to you,
depending on the style you want. Sometimes I cook the batch on low for about 30 min.,
sometimes I don't cook the batch.

phillyjazz well done
well done

Posts: 2982
Location: Philly

What's the deal with Fig? My neighbor just cut down a fig tree and is aging the wood thinking she will use it for smoking.
- Phillyjazz -

Grill Dome ceramic / Ducane Affinity 4200 gasser/ Concrete pit
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JPET medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 94
Location: LOS ANGELES
My fig wood leaves a residue on the meat like olive.
But your neighbors may not. Try it on inexpensive meat like burger. I do use it in the outdoor fireplace. By residue I mean an unflattering taste and film, like a bitter sap or kerosin like.


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