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The best way to cook turkey

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Post Thu Nov 07, 2013 7:00 am
Steven Grilling Guru
Grilling Guru

Posts: 292

What's the best way to cook turkey? Let me count the ways. On a rotisserie? Beer canning? Brined and smoked? This month I'll be blogging on some of my favorite ways to cook turkey with live fire. I'd love to hear YOUR favorite technique.

Post Thu Nov 07, 2013 2:09 pm
Griffin well done
well done

Posts: 3312
Location: Dallas, Texas

Spatchcock. Cuts the time down.

Post Thu Nov 07, 2013 3:01 pm
rhino260 medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 94
Location: Waynesboro,Pa
Spatchcock is the quickest. But deep frying is the best tasting!
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Post Thu Nov 07, 2013 6:23 pm
BubbaQue well done
well done

Posts: 659
Location: Panama City Beach, Fl.

I find a fried Turkey doesnt taste as good the next day for some reason. I have an oil less fryer and it is great for cooking a Turkey. I inject several days in advance. Skin is always crispy.
Weber 22 1/2 Platium
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Post Thu Nov 07, 2013 9:11 pm
ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7558
Location: Stoughton, WI
To take the spatchcock idea one step further, breaking the turkey down into the separate white and dark pieces makes it easy to get them done just right.

Post Fri Nov 08, 2013 6:46 am
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3054
Location: Atlanta-GA
I cut the Turkey into pieces like chicken. This way I can add pieces into the grill based on cooking time and size. Wings only take an hour; dark meat has a different internal temp and cooking time than white meat…etc. It also makes brining much easier, since I don’t need huge container to soak the Turkey.
Here I smoke roasted 3 Turkeys in around 2 hours.
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Post Fri Nov 08, 2013 8:39 am
BubbaQue well done
well done

Posts: 659
Location: Panama City Beach, Fl.

I recently saw an article in a mag about a guy who does that in his oven. Since you can buy parts these days you can also customize your cook as well. If you have a lot of white meat lovers cook more breast.

Is that a CharBroil CB? My wife had a uncle that used one. Many great cook came off that grill.

Man that looks good. I could go medevil on one of those legs. Good job.
Weber 22 1/2 Platium
Weber Smokey Joe Platinum
WSM

Post Fri Nov 08, 2013 11:12 am
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3054
Location: Atlanta-GA
Thanks BubbaQue :D
The grill is Char Griller with side fore box.
I only see turkey breasts and drumsticks at the store. So I started with whole turkeys and cut them to pieces :)
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Post Sun Nov 10, 2013 4:30 am
beercuer User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 2288
Location: Southern Californy
After trying other possible ways, including rotis, I find I get my best results with a turkey cannon (aka beer can turkey) :bbq:
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Got beer???

Post Mon Nov 11, 2013 1:25 pm
ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7558
Location: Stoughton, WI
I've seen photos of turkey cannons but have never worked with one. Does it have a reservoir for liquids?

Post Mon Nov 11, 2013 7:40 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3054
Location: Atlanta-GA
Brad,
I’ve used the Turkey Cannon as well. You get similar results to Beer-Can-Turkey.
Yes, it does have a reservoir for liquid and it is perforated towards the top so it can allow steam to escape and infuse the meat.
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The cannon does not require as much space in the grill, since the turkey sits at an angle
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Unlike Beer-Can-Turkey that sits vertically and require a bigger clearance
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Post Mon Nov 11, 2013 9:16 pm
beercuer User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 2288
Location: Southern Californy
Beautiful birdie, Z! Yes, Brad... I confirm what Z says, and that steam release not only makes the bird cook more quickly, but even more importantly perhaps is keeping it moist. I like to mix in a spoonful of poultry seasoning to whatever fluid I use at the time for that infusion as well. :D
Got beer???

Post Tue Nov 12, 2013 2:32 pm
phillyjazz well done
well done

Posts: 2980
Location: Philly

The past two years, I have cooked Heritage turkeys.. These are old breeds with very little fat, and do well with extreme temps (500-550F) for a short duration. I cook to 160F (the birds tend to be smaller size (10 lbs. or so) and 90 minutes usually saw them done. VERY tasty with no brining, as they are bred for taste and not enormous breasts.
- Phillyjazz -

Grill Dome ceramic / Ducane Affinity 4200 gasser/ Concrete pit
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Post Mon Nov 18, 2013 8:36 am
d_holck well done
well done

Posts: 846
Location: Illinois
Been doing Trash Can Turkeys for years... 2 hours for a 20# bird.
"... mmmmmmm 'bacon'."

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Post Mon Nov 18, 2013 12:31 pm
Trollby well done
well done

Posts: 1303
Location: MadCity, WI

For me it is always Brined now.

I tried injection and other ways but no mater how I cook it if I brine the turkey it always turned out moist and flavorful.

Just change the brine for the flavors you want, I like Brown sugar in all mine but other than that and Kosher salt any spice or additions is in your hands.

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