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September's Online Block Party - Pork!

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Cactus1 well done
well done

Posts: 741
Location: Indian Head Park, IL.
Brad
Those look great!
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18 1/2 & 22 1/2" WSM
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26 3/4" OTG

ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7393
Location: Stoughton, WI
Thanks! I've made the calzones several times and they've never disappointed me. IIRC the recipe's on page 134 of How to Grill and there's also a version on the Primal Grill site.

Post Mon Sep 23, 2013 10:38 pm
Cactus1 well done
well done

Posts: 741
Location: Indian Head Park, IL.
Just "tabbed" them in my new copy of "How To Grill". Lost my well worn old copy when I lost my job last year. I had a lot of good stuff written in margins and notes on recipes. By the time I remembered who I lent it to, it was to late to get it back. "How To Grill" has always been my "go to" book for recipes or ideas. Bet over the years that I've given 20 copies as gifts to friends and relatives.
* IHP Cactus Farm & Sauce Shack *
18 1/2 & 22 1/2" WSM
22 1/2" OTS
26 3/4" OTG

beercuer User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 2280
Location: Southern Californy
Mighty yummy looking gourmet chops there, Brad! I'd say you took those up a few notches. I'm sure the Bears would be most proud to dine those down, who by the way, look rather strong to me this season... more so than me Chargers.

I brought a little something to this party, too... a low and slow smoked butt @225 degrees with hickory. First, I slathered with mayo. No seasonings needed here this time, as I save that for whatever final recipe the pulls get used.

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Just before foiling...

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And here it is all pulled and chilled. Took me 13 hours from start to finish for a six pounder. That includes the cool down time. Took it to 200 degrees, and it pulled very nicely.

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First recipe called for a bbq sauced and Deluxe American cheesed sandwich on poppy seed roll. Sweet potato fries and pickle on the side. That be some good football food.

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Up next in the lineup is a taquito platter with guacamole and crema mexicana. A bit of shredded Romaine lettuce, and hit it with some salsa taquera. Baked rather than fried these to eliminate the oil. Sure went well with my blended slushy margarita!

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I may have another followup here soon... deciding between a pulled pork chow mein, or soft tacos, or tostadas. :cheers:
Got beer???

Post Wed Sep 25, 2013 11:17 am
ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7393
Location: Stoughton, WI
What a great spread but I really love the color of the bark right before foiling!

That's a good idea to smoke the pork unseasoned and then finish it as part of the final recipe - maximum versatility!

Steven Grilling Guru
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Food porn alive and well at www.barbecuebible.com!

Post Thu Sep 26, 2013 12:00 pm
CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
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Posts: 5811
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
ScreamingChicken wrote:
What a great spread but I really love the color of the bark right before foiling!

That's a good idea to smoke the pork unseasoned and then finish it as part of the final recipe - maximum versatility!


Yup - great looking pulled pork, BC! :cheers:
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

Post Thu Sep 26, 2013 12:21 pm
beercuer User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 2280
Location: Southern Californy
I thank you Brad, my Friend! I'm glad you like the color. I like how well mayo serves as a sealer. I didn't even have to mop with cider vinegar or whatever.

And thanks, CG! :cheers:
Got beer???

phillyjazz well done
well done

Posts: 2954
Location: Philly

It was recommended I copy this one to Block Party from the original (Bahn Mi) post as it is pork.

If you have a Vietnamese community near you, you have doubtless encountered this delectable $1-5 treat called Bahn-Mi. They are made with many kinds of meats (from Pâté to a Vietnamese version of Spam.) My favorite is stuffed with char-broiled pork called "thịt nướng" but most recipes for this are VERY complex with lots of ingredients. I decided to make a simple version.
Boneless loin pork chops were two for one at my local store. These are usually too-lean and flavorful to grill, but I found some marbled ones. First I Jaccarded them to absorb marinade, and then pounded them thin under plastic wrap to about 1/2" thickness. For a marinade, I threw together a few dashes of fish sauce, rice wine vinegar, granulated garlic and onion, a little soy, and plenty of Sugar in the Raw (I buy large boxes.) I rushed the marinade with my Eastman Marivac. Done in 30 minutes.
Lots of sugar ensures these caramelize and they cooked crispy in about two minutes per side (on a 500F hardwood coal fire.)
While they are marinating, you prepare the "veggies." If your wife is a caterer, you might have a "julienne" tool. If not, do the best you can with the carrots. Peel a cuke and slice it lengthwise. I cored the jalapenos so they wouldn't be TOO hot. Toss some sugar on top of the carrots, and they will go limp by the time you are ready to garnish. Put the Cilantro on at the last minute.
Vietnam, colonized by the French, became enamored of baguettes, but they also use rice flour which makes a lighter bread (almost like Cuban.) I scoop the roll (in S. Philly that is called "operated") to make it less bready and toast just before assembling. Also, a little swipe of Mayo is traditional.. ahh, the French...
This pork can also be served with rice or noodles (rice vermicelli) with some crushed peanuts on top and some additional sauce of fish sauce, soy and Siracha if you like it extra hot.
Anyway, a nice exotic take on what would otherwise be a bland pork chop.. These could be eaten room temp for tailgates ... Just be sure and put the Cilantro on at the last minute or it tastes like dish detergent.

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Last edited by phillyjazz on Sat Oct 05, 2013 8:59 am, edited 1 time in total.
- Phillyjazz -

Grill Dome ceramic / Ducane Affinity 4200 gasser/ Concrete pit
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Cactus1 well done
well done

Posts: 741
Location: Indian Head Park, IL.
Did some nice center cut boneless pork chops tonight. I know ... need to start doing pictures.
Baked potatoes in the coals and grilled some sweet corn to go with.
* IHP Cactus Farm & Sauce Shack *
18 1/2 & 22 1/2" WSM
22 1/2" OTS
26 3/4" OTG

ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7393
Location: Stoughton, WI
Did you brine them first? I'm usually not a fan of that cut because so often it's just too darn lean for my liking.

Thanks for copying your post, PJ! I fixed the photos for you.

ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7393
Location: Stoughton, WI
I think I'm about done with pork for the month so I'll wrap up my contributions with some pork steaks I grilled the last 2 nights. Both recipes are from Weber's time to grill.

Wednesday night I used the Pork Chops With Herb-Garlic Rub recipe from page 116. There aren't that many pork steak recipes out there but I've found that most chop recipes work just fine.
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The rub consists primarily of rosemary, sage, garlic, and olive oil, and it smells great!
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Since the steak was fairly thick I seared each side over briquettes and then finished it with indirect heat.
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The grilling process really mellows the flavors, especially the garlic, but they're still there. I cooked the steak fairly thoroughly but it still was moist.
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Last night I used a similar steak with the Whiskey-Mustard Pork Chops on page 108. The marinade/glaze is mostly whiskey (I used Canadian Club) and grainy mustard, with a little vanilla and brown sugar thrown in.
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This is the steak after about an hour in the fridge. The glaze was pretty thin but set up OK.
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I used the same sear/indirect technique as the night before, and the sugar in the glaze helped the cast iron create some great grill marks.
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The pork itself was fine but I have mixed feelings about the glaze. It had a very unique flavor but I found it to be a little too sweet; I did cut way back on the amount of brown sugar called for but the mustard I used also had some sweetness. I might try it again but if I do I'll use a more "mustardy" mustard like Boetje's or Grey Poupon.
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Post Fri Sep 27, 2013 10:49 pm
beercuer User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 2280
Location: Southern Californy
Niiiice!!! I swear, Brad, you and I like our pork steaks the same way, with plenty of fat, and those are my favorite herbs as well. You really got me hungry again there. And like you, I really do not need any added sweetness to my chops/steaks. I wonder if you have ever done the rib end chops? They're my fav. :cheers:
Got beer???

Cactus1 well done
well done

Posts: 741
Location: Indian Head Park, IL.
ScreamingChicken wrote:
Did you brine them first? I'm usually not a fan of that cut because so often it's just too darn lean for my liking.

Thanks for copying your post, PJ! I fixed the photos for you.

No brine. Did a quick sear and then moved them to the cooler side of the grill to finish.
* IHP Cactus Farm & Sauce Shack *
18 1/2 & 22 1/2" WSM
22 1/2" OTS
26 3/4" OTG

Cactus1 well done
well done

Posts: 741
Location: Indian Head Park, IL.
beercuer wrote:
Niiiice!!! I swear, Brad, you and I like our pork steaks the same way, with plenty of fat, and those are my favorite herbs as well. You really got me hungry again there. And like you, I really do not need any added sweetness to my chops/steaks. I wonder if you have ever done the rib end chops? They're my fav. :cheers:

To quote our illustrious fellow pork steak lover ... "Niiiice!" Pork steaks can be some of my favorite things to grill. I like them about 3/4" thick - nice fat content - and more a St. Louis type of grilling - a liberal dose of barbecue rub and finish with some Maull's or Maull's style barbecue sauce.
* IHP Cactus Farm & Sauce Shack *
18 1/2 & 22 1/2" WSM
22 1/2" OTS
26 3/4" OTG

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