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Boneless chuck ribs / steaks

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Post Fri Aug 23, 2013 3:11 pm
phillyjazz well done
well done

Posts: 2956
Location: Philly

I bought a bunch of these at Costo thinking I would braise them in beer in the slow cooker. When I took them out and saw the marbling, I thought they were too pretty for that treatment. Knowing chuck can be a little tough I took a Jaccard to them which flattened them a little (you can see the front two vs. the third (original thickness.) I'll post the results when I cut into them tonight. They are resting in the fridge for about five hours bathed in Montreal seasoning.

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Last edited by phillyjazz on Sat Aug 24, 2013 8:51 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Grill Dome ceramic / Ducane Affinity 4200 gasser/ Concrete pit
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Post Fri Aug 23, 2013 7:13 pm
CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
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Posts: 5823
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
You're right, philly - they're too nice to braise. Can't wait to see the results! :D
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

Post Sat Aug 24, 2013 8:51 am
phillyjazz well done
well done

Posts: 2956
Location: Philly

These were still a TAD tougher than the average rib eye (then again my average ribeye is dry-aged angus) but VERY flavorful. Maybe I should have Jaccarded a little more aggressively, but I'm always afraid of ruining the texture. No complaints from the family. Also, eating up the last of the local corn for the season, while I can get it. I think the pix turned out pretty good for a phone cam. Samsung Galaxy S4 does some nice close-ups...




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Grill Dome ceramic / Ducane Affinity 4200 gasser/ Concrete pit
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Post Sat Aug 24, 2013 10:46 pm
ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
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Location: Stoughton, WI
Great-looking steaks before and after, PJ! If you had sliced them really thin do you think they would've been OK for cheesesteaks?

Post Sun Aug 25, 2013 8:33 am
phillyjazz well done
well done

Posts: 2956
Location: Philly

ScreamingChicken wrote:
Great-looking steaks before and after, PJ! If you had sliced them really thin do you think they would've been OK for cheesesteaks?



Nobody uses chuck for cheese steaks. It's either rib eye or top sirloin in Philly. I think chuck has too much grain. Also, you don't really see well-marbled meat in that space. Could be because everyone just buts cheap Select, because it usually going to be chopped up on the flattop anyway. A few places in Philly (Pat's, Geno's, Steve's) do the whole-slice style, but in general, they are tougher even though the slice is thin.
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Grill Dome ceramic / Ducane Affinity 4200 gasser/ Concrete pit
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Post Mon Aug 26, 2013 10:47 am
CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
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Posts: 5823
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
phillyjazz wrote:
These were still a TAD tougher than the average rib eye (then again my average ribeye is dry-aged angus) but VERY flavorful. Maybe I should have Jaccarded a little more aggressively, but I'm always afraid of ruining the texture. No complaints from the family. Also, eating up the last of the local corn for the season, while I can get it. I think the pix turned out pretty good for a phone cam. Samsung Galaxy S4 does some nice close-ups...


My dad bought some of these at Costco this weekend so I dropped by and we tried them out. They were a little bit tougher than a rib-eye, but that wasn't really noticeable. My mom and dad are "no pink in the meat at all" kind of folks, so their steaks went on 8 minutes before mine and they still turned out great. I'll be grabbing a few of these myself as they're a good size for a single meal.

The meat guy at Costco described them as "cross-rib steaks". In my experience that often means "chuck-eye steak" up here so I aksed him about it. He said some of them were chuck-eyes, and some were chuck. For those of you who have Costco memberships I'd recommend grabbing some of these.

Oh- and after reading this thread I sliced up a bit of the leftover steak and made a sandwich using a baguette, a bit of extra-old cheddar cheese, red onions and pickled peppers, plus horseradish mayo and whole-grain mustard. Definitely not a cheesesteak, but it beat the tar out of any "steak sandwich" I've had in a decade or so. :twisted:
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

Post Mon Aug 26, 2013 8:25 pm
phillyjazz well done
well done

Posts: 2956
Location: Philly

CharredGriller wrote:
phillyjazz wrote:
These were still a TAD tougher than the average rib eye (then again my average ribeye is dry-aged angus) but VERY flavorful. Maybe I should have Jaccarded a little more aggressively, but I'm always afraid of ruining the texture. No complaints from the family. Also, eating up the last of the local corn for the season, while I can get it. I think the pix turned out pretty good for a phone cam. Samsung Galaxy S4 does some nice close-ups...


My dad bought some of these at Costco this weekend so I dropped by and we tried them out. They were a little bit tougher than a rib-eye, but that wasn't really noticeable. My mom and dad are "no pink in the meat at all" kind of folks, so their steaks went on 8 minutes before mine and they still turned out great. I'll be grabbing a few of these myself as they're a good size for a single meal.

The meat guy at Costco described them as "cross-rib steaks". In my experience that often means "chuck-eye steak" up here so I aksed him about it. He said some of them were chuck-eyes, and some were chuck. For those of you who have Costco memberships I'd recommend grabbing some of these.

Oh- and after reading this thread I sliced up a bit of the leftover steak and made a sandwich using a baguette, a bit of extra-old cheddar cheese, red onions and pickled peppers, plus horseradish mayo and whole-grain mustard. Definitely not a cheesesteak, but it beat the tar out of any "steak sandwich" I've had in a decade or so. :twisted:



I know it's "off topic" for this forum, but these are great "slow cooker" fare... cover in some beef broth and beer. Toss in a few garlic cloves, onion slices and a bit of Herbes de Provence, and you got some tender meat to do all kinds of stuff with. Of course, I suspect you could also do them low and slow, and foil them to catch the juice, and it would probably be even better !! :D
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Grill Dome ceramic / Ducane Affinity 4200 gasser/ Concrete pit
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Post Mon Sep 09, 2013 1:04 am
Cactus1 well done
well done

Posts: 741
Location: Indian Head Park, IL.
Used to go to a butcher, now closed, that would save chuck eyes for me. He said that he only got one true chuck eye out of a side of beef. I'd call him a week or so before going and he'd start setting them aside for me. They were a small - maybe 6 or 7 ounce, well marbled, very flavorful, and if I remember correctly very tender. Good for a quick high heat grill. I could eat two or three of them for a meal.
When we make Philly cheese steak, I usually grill a London Broil - whatever that is, slice thin across the grain, use a nice hard roll - split and grill toasted, spread both sides of the roll with garlic butter, assemble the sandwich with slices of steak, grilled peppers and onions - maybe some mushrooms, top with cheese, wrap loosely in foil, and put back on the grill to let the cheese melt. I like to top with a mix of Heinz 57 and horseradish.
* IHP Cactus Farm & Sauce Shack *
18 1/2 & 22 1/2" WSM
22 1/2" OTS
26 3/4" OTG

Post Tue Sep 10, 2013 6:24 pm
CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
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Posts: 5823
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
Cactus1 wrote:
Used to go to a butcher, now closed, that would save chuck eyes for me. He said that he only got one true chuck eye out of a side of beef. I'd call him a week or so before going and he'd start setting them aside for me. They were a small - maybe 6 or 7 ounce, well marbled, very flavorful, and if I remember correctly very tender. Good for a quick high heat grill. I could eat two or three of them for a meal.
When we make Philly cheese steak, I usually grill a London Broil - whatever that is, slice thin across the grain, use a nice hard roll - split and grill toasted, spread both sides of the roll with garlic butter, assemble the sandwich with slices of steak, grilled peppers and onions - maybe some mushrooms, top with cheese, wrap loosely in foil, and put back on the grill to let the cheese melt. I like to top with a mix of Heinz 57 and horseradish.


Weird - the chuck eyes I get from my butcher are about the size of a good striploin steak, and about 1" thick.
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

Post Wed Sep 11, 2013 12:23 am
Cactus1 well done
well done

Posts: 741
Location: Indian Head Park, IL.
CharredGriller wrote:
Cactus1 wrote:
Used to go to a butcher, now closed, that would save chuck eyes for me. He said that he only got one true chuck eye out of a side of beef. I'd call him a week or so before going and he'd start setting them aside for me. They were a small - maybe 6 or 7 ounce, well marbled, very flavorful, and if I remember correctly very tender. Good for a quick high heat grill. I could eat two or three of them for a meal.
When we make Philly cheese steak, I usually grill a London Broil - whatever that is, slice thin across the grain, use a nice hard roll - split and grill toasted, spread both sides of the roll with garlic butter, assemble the sandwich with slices of steak, grilled peppers and onions - maybe some mushrooms, top with cheese, wrap loosely in foil, and put back on the grill to let the cheese melt. I like to top with a mix of Heinz 57 and horseradish.


Weird - the chuck eyes I get from my butcher are about the size of a good striploin steak, and about 1" thick.

I don't know but maybe living in Canada has something to do with it. When I lived near Niagara Falls in the early 1980's and in Toledo, OH area until 1988, I bought probably 90% of my meat, poultry, fish, and produce in Ontario. Good exchange, at the time, on the dollar, but even better was the quality. Miss being able to go to the farmer's markets in southern Ontario.
* IHP Cactus Farm & Sauce Shack *
18 1/2 & 22 1/2" WSM
22 1/2" OTS
26 3/4" OTG


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