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Christmas Prime Rib

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Post Thu Dec 06, 2012 5:29 pm

Posts: 41
Location: Castroville, CA
I am planning on doing a Prime grade Prime Rib for Christmas. I would welcome any advice!!!!

I will be using my UDS, which is equipped with a BBQguru unit. So keeping my temps (both pit and meat) in check shouldn't be a problem.

I am planning on rubbing with a mixture of salt, garlic powder, onion powder, dry mustard and pepper. Also was planning on getting it to room temp prior to going on the UDS.

I was thinking 250 on the pit temp. Any ideas on cooking times per pound for medium rare??? I am feeding about 10 hungry people.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!!!!!

Thanks,
Sean
Weber 22.5" Kettle
New Braunfels Silver Smoker
UDS

Post Fri Dec 07, 2012 6:45 am
tbk420 well done
well done

Posts: 721
Location: Western Pa.
I cook to internal temperature of 220, then pull and tent in foil for the rest. The temp will continue to rise for a little bit after pulling.

Does the Guru have a temp probe for the meat?

Post Fri Dec 07, 2012 9:51 am
ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7495
Location: Stoughton, WI
Tbk420, are you sure you don't mean 120? :wink:

Sean, I don't have any experience with prime grade rib roasts but at 250 I'd make my first temp check at 60 minutes in, unless you have a remote temp probe as was suggested. Alternatively, one of the old-fashioned meat therms designed to sit in the roast during cooking will work just fine. Since you'll have a decent-sized roast for 10 people (are you going bone-in or boneless?) you'll have a good window for resting, probably at least 30 minutes or more if you tent it with foil.

Post Fri Dec 07, 2012 1:02 pm

Posts: 41
Location: Castroville, CA
Yes, the guru has a meat probe. I can program the computer to hold the meat once it hits the target temp. I am going to do a bone-in, but have the butcher cut the bones off the roast, but cook it as if bone in and serve the ribs on the side. I think the bones will be the best part!!!!!

I have a DigiQ DX2 system with the biggest fan with both meat and pit probes. Its kind of cheating, but I can keep the temp of my UDS at 225 for 18hrs without having to refuel. Which means great pulled pork or brisket.

I was thinking probably 15-20 min/lb for medium rare???? I am planning on at least a 30 minute rest.

I will be sure to take lots of pics!!!!

Thanks for the help,

Sean
Weber 22.5" Kettle
New Braunfels Silver Smoker
UDS

Post Fri Dec 07, 2012 4:47 pm
phillyjazz well done
well done

Posts: 2974
Location: Philly

I wouldn't go nuts on Prime grade if I can get Angus or a nice Choice cut for considerably less. The cut itself usually is generously marbled. My favorite technique of late is low and slow (250F) to 120F internal (wireless thermometer) and hit it with a weed burner at the end to get a crust. Keeps it rosy red end-to-end with a nice crispy fat layer on the outside, and gets some nice wood flavor.
Last edited by phillyjazz on Sat Dec 08, 2012 8:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
- Phillyjazz -

Grill Dome ceramic / Ducane Affinity 4200 gasser/ Concrete pit
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Post Fri Dec 07, 2012 5:56 pm
EddieK1376 well done
well done

Posts: 657
Location: Noblesville, IN

Why are we saying internal temp to 220? I'm so confused....

Post Fri Dec 07, 2012 6:28 pm
scorched_porch User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 404
Location: Redwood City, California

I'm with Eddie on this one... I would not think you'd see much rosy red at 220. 120, yes. :?
Argentine Grill
WSM, Pit Barrel Cooker
http://thequinchoproject.wordpress.com/

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Post Sat Dec 08, 2012 8:18 am
phillyjazz well done
well done

Posts: 2974
Location: Philly

scorched_porch wrote:
I'm with Eddie on this one... I would not think you'd see much rosy red at 220. 120, yes. :?


LOL !! meant One twenty !! These are not briskets!!
- Phillyjazz -

Grill Dome ceramic / Ducane Affinity 4200 gasser/ Concrete pit
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Post Sat Dec 08, 2012 2:15 pm
tbk420 well done
well done

Posts: 721
Location: Western Pa.
ScreamingChicken wrote:
Tbk420, are you sure you don't mean 120? :wink:

Sean, I don't have any experience with prime grade rib roasts but at 250 I'd make my first temp check at 60 minutes in, unless you have a remote temp probe as was suggested. Alternatively, one of the old-fashioned meat therms designed to sit in the roast during cooking will work just fine. Since you'll have a decent-sized roast for 10 people (are you going bone-in or boneless?) you'll have a good window for resting, probably at least 30 minutes or more if you tent it with foil.



OH MY :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

My bad - please don't EVER cook a prime rib to 220! :oops:

Post Mon Dec 10, 2012 5:56 pm
Joe Grod medium
medium

Posts: 190
Location: Morganville, NJ
Just to add a little fuel to the fire. For Christmas day dinner, I usually feed about 10+ off a 7 Bone Rib Roast. Seeing as 7 ribs is the largest roast that can be called a "Rib Roast", I buy the whole piece and just have the butcher take off the chine bone for easier slicing. I have experimented with so many different ways of cooking this cut and would not want to take the chance of screwing dinner up for my wife, sons, daughters and their spouses, that I have stuck to the following tried and true.

Oven at 350, roast slightly cooler than room temp. rub the roast with gravy master or kitchen bouquet, sprinkle with sea or kosher salt, black pepper, onion and a little garlic powder. Roast at 350 for 2 1/2 hours, let it sit for for additional hours, always perfect. Here are some pics of a 5 bone roast I made.

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Post Mon Dec 10, 2012 8:26 pm
lostarrow well done
well done

Posts: 597
Location: mississippi
phillyjazz wrote:
I wouldn't go nuts on Prime grade if I can get Angus or a nice Choice cut for considerably less. The cut itself usually is generously marbled. My favorite technique of late is low and slow (250F) to 120F internal (wireless thermometer) and hit it with a weed burner at the end to get a crust. Keeps it rosy red end-to-end with a nice crispy fat layer on the outside, and gets some nice wood flavor.

I'm with Philly on this , except I smoke till 110F or so & finish in preheated 450F oven for a few minutes to crisp the surface, I might have to get a weedburner :mrgreen:
New Braunfels
vermont castings gas grill
WSM
Char-Griller Kamodo

Post Tue Dec 11, 2012 8:46 am
ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7495
Location: Stoughton, WI
You don't have a weedburner? I thought something like that is practically mandatory down south to try to keep the kudzu at bay! :lol:

Post Tue Dec 11, 2012 10:47 am
Trollby well done
well done

Posts: 1303
Location: MadCity, WI

I found I like my Prime rib done about 275* since it still is slow enough but the outside crisp up better than 220-250*F

I do mine to about 120-125*F pull and foil cover for about 10-15min

Outside and first cut is more medium (for those that want it that way) the rest is perfect Medium-Rare.

I like to use Rosemary with my prime-rib rub and do the cuts with garlic and rose-mary stuffed in.

Damn my mouth is watering 8)

Post Tue Dec 11, 2012 9:35 pm

Posts: 41
Location: Castroville, CA
Great, great information. I appreciate all the replies.

I don't think you can go wrong with onion, garlic and rosemary. I have a rub that has salt, onion and garlic powder, pepper, and dry mustard. Using that with the addition of some fresh rosemary from the garden will make for a great prime rib.

I will take lots of pictures for posting during and after the cook.

Thanks again,

Sean
Weber 22.5" Kettle
New Braunfels Silver Smoker
UDS


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