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Smokin' and brasin'

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Post Sun Oct 14, 2012 5:33 pm
smokin'gal well done
well done

Posts: 1541
Location: Seattle, WA
I'm currently engaged in a number of dry aging and charcuterie efforts. I told myself no more of these type of "projects" until I'm done with what's underway. Then I go to the store, and well, I just can't help myself. I saw this 7-bone chuck roast and thought about how I've never made one. Thoughts of dry aging it overcame me and well, here it is (was):

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Beautiful and on sale. I placed it in a dry age bag:

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and for the next 30 days, struggled to figure out just what to do with it. I also had the remaining short ribs from Costco continuing to dry age. When the chuck roast hit 30 days, the short ribs were at 42:

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What to do..what to do. Well, I got short ribs and chuck roast trimmed:

chuck roast before:
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Chuck roast after:
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Short ribs before:
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Short ribs after:
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The trim loss after 42 days on the short ribs was significant. I'll stick to 30 days in the future.

I decided I would braise both meats together, after giving them a good dose of smoke first. I seasoned the chuck roast and ribs with some Dizzy Pig dust, and tossed them on the Egg with oak and cherry wood. The braising liquid started out with a couple of bottles of Shiraz, which was heated and set aflame to burn off most of the alcohol. Then a blend of dry, ground mushrooms was added in, along with some mushroom base, salt, and pepper:

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A mix of onions and shallots had been placed on the smoker to roast:

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After 2 hours at 225, the meat was placed in the pan with the onion/shallot mix, and the braising liquid was added:

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The pan was left uncovered for 3 hours to allow for more smoke to seep it's way into the mix:

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At that point, the pan was covered and allowed to braise for another 3 hours, until the meat was very tender:

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As tempted as I was to reduce some of the braising liquid, and pour it all over the meat and some smoked mashed potatoes, I decided against it. I wanted to try something different. I let the meat mellow out in the fridge for two days, knowing that the flavors would only deepen during this time.
At this point, I decided to use some of the braising liquid to make a batch of red wine & shroom bacon jam. The deep flavors from the dry aged meat, mushroom blend, and Shiraz wine would add a nice level of complexity to it. I've covered how I make bacon jam before, so I won't go into too much detail here:

Thick sliced beef bacon, diced, and rendered:

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Shallots, sweet onions, and crushed garlic cooking in bacon fat:

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Blend of 5 different dry mushrooms (not quite sure which, I have a lot):

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Adding the regular ingredients into the pot, along with the ground dried mushrooms, and 1.5 cups of the braising liquid:

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Adding the rendered bacon:

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Bacon jam, cooking and reducing:

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All done:

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I figured, since I've made bacon jam, I may as well make a sandwich to pull all the ingredients together. I rounded up some sourdough bread, smoked fontina, and white American cheeses. Some of the chuck roast and short ribs meat was steamed and shredded:

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The chuck roast & short rib melt (with a few dollops of bacon jam wedged in the middle) toasting up nicely:

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There were so many different flavors revolving around that sandwich. The deep, rich earthiness from the dry aged meat and ground mushrooms. The bit of heat and sweet from the bacon jam. The robust overtones of the Shiraz, which had fully permeated the meat. The creamy and mellow zestiness from the American cheese. Then the smokey finish from the meat and the smoked fontina. This is a sandwich, that while incredibly and delectably unctuous, can only be eaten once a year (for those that desire to maintain a healthy heart).

The next day, I made a grilled pizza. The braising liquid was reduced to a thick sauce, and then mixed with some San Marzano tomato sauce. This was followed by a layer of smoked fontina cheese. The meat was shredded and topped with another layer of rendered beef bacon, which was finished with a layer of mozzarella.

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Fresh off the Egg:

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Oh man--that grilled pizza was one for the ages. It was like the sandwich made the day before, with a super crunchy crust.

Good eats.

Post Sun Oct 14, 2012 11:05 pm
jfm0830 well done
well done

Posts: 2638
Location: Northeastern MA

I was hoping you might've made a post, when I saw you had replied to some messages I was following or had posted. I wasn't disappointed. I'll tell you you have far more patience than I do, I don't think I could've sliced & chopped up all at bacon like you did. But it looks like the end results for more than well worth the effort. That was a magnificent looking pizza. Everything else looks great too.

Jim
2 Large BGEs
Kenmore Elite 6 Burner Gas Grill
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BBQ Site: http://grillinsmokin.net

Post Sun Oct 14, 2012 11:10 pm
d_holck well done
well done

Posts: 839
Location: Illinois
That's amazing. I can almost taste that sandwich. Mercy! Thanks for sharing.
"... mmmmmmm 'bacon'."

CG Outlaw w/SFB
UDS
Old classic Weber Kettle

Post Mon Oct 15, 2012 8:42 am
ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7466
Location: Stoughton, WI
Very creative use of the chuck roast, SG! I can't recall ever hearing about one being braised before because they do so well with dry heat.

The sandwich looks awesome...I can almost taste the richness!

Post Mon Oct 15, 2012 11:50 am
smokin'gal well done
well done

Posts: 1541
Location: Seattle, WA
Thanks for checking out my post guys.

jfm0830 wrote:
I'll tell you you have far more patience than I do, I don't think I could've sliced & chopped up all at bacon like you did.


The amount of time spent on each particular ingredient far outweighs the few minutes spent chopping up the bacon. :lol:

jfm0830 wrote:
The sandwich looks awesome...I can almost taste the richness!


It was very rich. I could feel my heart slowing down with each bite. :D

Post Mon Oct 15, 2012 3:08 pm
tex_toby well done
well done

Posts: 1787
Location: Sherman, Texas

Looks good, I mean RRREEAAAALLLL good! :)
20" x 40" Party Gator Pit
Char-Griller Wrangler w/Side-burner - My camping grill

Post Mon Oct 15, 2012 4:39 pm
jsperk well done
well done

Posts: 945
Location: Pittsburgh PA
That is one impressive cook. Great job.
Weber OTG/smokneator/rotisserie
Grill Dome/Stoker

Post Mon Oct 15, 2012 8:59 pm
Dyal_SC well done
well done

Posts: 3712
Location: Lexington, SC
Very, very, verrrrry nice! :)
Large BGE
CG Duo with SFB

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Post Tue Oct 16, 2012 4:26 pm
scorched_porch User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 398
Location: Redwood City, California

Fantastic post, wonderfully creative use of ingredients. I really love to see this kind of food so meticulously created with a passion from somebody that obviously cares about what they are doing. This is exactly the sort of thing that floats my boat. Kudos.
Argentine Grill
WSM, Pit Barrel Cooker
http://thequinchoproject.wordpress.com/

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Post Tue Oct 16, 2012 4:29 pm
scorched_porch User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 398
Location: Redwood City, California

One more thing though - technically wouldn't that process be wet aging rather than dry? I've seen dry aging rigs in old refrigerators that allow air to circulate around the meat - the aging bag intrigues me. Must research this more.
Argentine Grill
WSM, Pit Barrel Cooker
http://thequinchoproject.wordpress.com/

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Post Tue Oct 16, 2012 4:36 pm
smokin'gal well done
well done

Posts: 1541
Location: Seattle, WA
scorched_porch wrote:
One more thing though - technically wouldn't that process be wet aging rather than dry? I've seen dry aging rigs in old refrigerators that allow air to circulate around the meat - the aging bag intrigues me. Must research this more.


I use the dry age bags from http://www.drybagsteak.com. They have lots of info on the site about how the bags and the process works.

Post Tue Oct 16, 2012 4:46 pm
scorched_porch User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 398
Location: Redwood City, California

Excellent. That's exactly the same site I found when I started my search... I have got to give this a rip. Thanks for the insight!
Argentine Grill
WSM, Pit Barrel Cooker
http://thequinchoproject.wordpress.com/

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Post Thu Oct 18, 2012 12:38 pm
beercuer User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 2287
Location: Southern Californy
One more out-of-this-world post, Pitmaster SG!
Got beer???


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