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Brining

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Post Sat Nov 22, 2003 11:55 am
jeff raw
raw

Posts: 8
Location: Zürich, Switzerland

Was just wondering what to brine. I have read that all kinds of meats benefit from brining, but I have not seen much information beyond that. Any suggestions, tips, or additional info out there?

Thanks,
Jeff

Post Sat Nov 22, 2003 4:05 pm
Luke medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 89
Location: Texas

Poultry, pork and shrimp
Live Different

Post Sun Nov 23, 2003 11:46 am
chagan well done
well done

Posts: 1350
Location: Central NJ by way of NY
Well, being that time of year, turkey benefits greatly from brining. Turkey does have a tendency to dry out a bit, the brining process makes the meat nice and jucy- including the white meat.
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No, it ain't burnt- it's barbecue

Post Mon Nov 24, 2003 9:37 am
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
I brined a chicken last week for the first time and it was the juiciest chicken I'd ever had. Brining makes a big difference. I understand it also works well on fish.
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Post Mon Nov 24, 2003 11:55 am
jeff raw
raw

Posts: 8
Location: Zürich, Switzerland

Thanks for the feedback guys.
I found a good article on the subject in case there are any other new guys out there looking for additional info...

http://bbq.about.com/cs/barbecuetips/a/aa112000b.htm


Happy Brining!
Jeff

Post Mon Nov 24, 2003 8:39 pm
dkirn well done
well done

Posts: 388
Location: St. Louis, MO
Jeff -

Thanks for the link - I have never used the brine method that everyone has been talking about and was going to ask for more info

Thanks

Post Mon Nov 24, 2003 10:20 pm
PaulP well done
well done

Posts: 681
Location: Beautiful St. Mary's County, Maryland
Generally, brine any meat that is low in fat. The most common examples are poultry and pork. 15 years ago, it was totally unnecessary to brine pork because it had a significant amount of marbled fat. But due to a lot of work by pig farmers to make their product acceptable to today's lower fat diets, pork is now extremely lean and benefits greatly from brining.

Never heard of brining shrimp, however. Marinating, yes, brining, no. Why would you brine shrimp?
PaulP
If you don't like the food, have more wine

Post Tue Nov 25, 2003 8:33 am
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
This is my go-to for brine it is my favorite!! It obviously works on more than just Turkey!

Funky Bird (a.k.a. Southwestern Turkey Breast)

Recipe Summary
Prep Time: 30 minutes Cook Time: 2 hours 30 minutes
Yield: 6 to 8 servings

Brine:
1 cup fresh lemon juice
3/4 cup orange juice
1 cup kosher salt
1 cup packed light brown sugar
1 cup chopped yellow onions
2 oranges, halved
2 jalapenos, minced (with their seeds)
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
2 tablespoons chopped garlic
1 tablespoon chili powder
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon dried oregano, preferably Mexican
1 (6 1/2 pound) whole turkey breast
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 tablespoon Essence, recipe follows
Poblano Chocolate Mole, recipe follows

In a large non reactive container, combine lemon juice, orange juice, kosher salt, light brown sugar, yellow onions, oranges, jalapenos, cilantro, garlic, chili powder, ground cumin, and oregano with 1 gallon water and stir to dissolve the sugar and salt. Put the turkey in a large colander and rinse under cold, running water, then add the turkey breast to the brine, cover, and refrigerate, turning occasionally, for at least 12 hours and up to 24 hours.
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

Remove the turkey from the brine and put it breast side up in a large, heavy roasting pan and pat dry with paper towels. Rub the turkey with vegetable oil and sprinkle both sides with Essence. Roast until deep golden brown and an instant read thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the thigh reads 165 degrees F., about 1 hour and 45 minutes. Transfer to a platter and let stand for 15 minutes before carving.

Essence (Emeril's Creole Seasoning):
2 1/2 tablespoons paprika
2 tablespoons salt
2 tablespoons garlic powder
1 tablespoon black pepper
1 tablespoon onion powder
1 tablespoon cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon dried leaf oregano
1 tablespoon dried thyme

Combine all ingredients thoroughly and store in an airtight jar or container.
Yield: about 2/3 cup

Recipe from "New New Orleans Cooking", by Emeril Lagasse and Jessie Tirsch. Published by William and Morrow, 1993.
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Post Tue Nov 25, 2003 9:03 am
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
Don't shrimp brine most of their lives???
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Post Tue Nov 25, 2003 10:56 am
Airfoils well done
well done

Posts: 1063
About the only thing I brine anymore is pork loin. I use injectable marinade on almost all my poultry anymore since I enjoy it's versatility. Brining though is a great way to add moisture and flavor as you've already been informed. While there are a million ways to make brine, generally you should use equal parts sugar and salt to taste. I don't understand the bringing shrimp thing either besides the pun.

Post Tue Nov 25, 2003 11:08 am
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
:lol: :lol: :lol:
And if you get them from certain waters the come pre marinated!!
Ask Chagan about those shrimp from "Joisy" waters.
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Post Tue Nov 25, 2003 11:51 am
chagan well done
well done

Posts: 1350
Location: Central NJ by way of NY
Yes, I love Joisy shrimp! They are chuck full of hospital by products and 30 weight-YUM
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No, it ain't burnt- it's barbecue

Post Tue Nov 25, 2003 10:46 pm
dkirn well done
well done

Posts: 388
Location: St. Louis, MO
Grand Scale -

Thanks for posting that recipe it sounds great! A quick question on brining - I have seen some info on other websites that state that you should place your turkey (whole or just a turkey breast) in the brine frozen and let it thaw in the brine. Is this true? Has anyone tried this method??

Post Wed Nov 26, 2003 8:46 am
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
I have done this with marinades but not with brine. But as the principle of the two is very similar I wouldn't see why it wouldn't work. The principle is this...
If you're going to freeze the food anyway, add you marinade/brine before you freeze it. Then through the freezing/thawing process of the liquids in the meat the meat will absorb more flavor than usual.
It does work, but if you prefer fresh meat (like I know you do dkirn, the only guy I know who goes to the butcher multiple times a week!) then I'd try marinating/brining using your vaccum sealer you'll get similar results.

Good Luck and Enjoy!
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Post Wed Nov 26, 2003 9:23 am
dkirn well done
well done

Posts: 388
Location: St. Louis, MO
Grand Scale -

Thanks for the info and I guess you know my M.O. now!

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