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Mustard slather for pork butt

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Post Sat Jun 27, 2009 10:52 pm

Posts: 5
Location: Columbus, OH
I have read several recipes that call for a mustard slather to be put on pork butt before applying the dry rub. Has anyone tried this? If so, did you notice any difference between using the mustard and not using it?
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Post Sat Jun 27, 2009 11:12 pm
ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
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Posts: 7333
Location: Stoughton, WI
When I use a mustard slather it seems to develop a crustier bark, especially if it and the rub are allowed to set before cooking.

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Post Sat Jun 27, 2009 11:13 pm
tbk420 well done
well done

Posts: 721
Location: Western Pa.
I use it mainly to help the rub adhere to the meat. It doesn't impart any noticeable flavor, usually.

Post Sat Jun 27, 2009 11:38 pm
Blazer well done
well done

Posts: 422
Location: Jackson, TN
I tried it a few times and didn't notice any real flavor difference. I have quit using it, however, I do allow my rub to sit on the butt for up to 8 hours before cooking. I get plenty of bark, so for me, mustard seemed to be a waste.
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Post Sun Jun 28, 2009 8:41 am
olewarthog well done
well done

Posts: 372
Location: South GA

I use a mustard slather on both butts & ribs. There is no flavor enhancement from the mustard, except salt. The slather is simply a way to make the rub stick to the meat & make a better bark. All the mustard flavor cooks away, but since mustard has a high salt content, it does increase the saltiness of your rub. This is not much of a factor with butts, since the bark gets mixed in with unsalted interal meat. Ribs, however, can be a different story. I don't use any salt in my rib rub recipe since I get enough salt flavor from the mustard slather..
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Post Sun Jun 28, 2009 9:38 am
Blazer well done
well done

Posts: 422
Location: Jackson, TN
There is no flavor enhancement from the mustard, except salt.



Make your own mustard and you can control the salinity, flavor, and heat. I found a recipe and make my own. I don't remember where I got it, but, I think it is Alton Brown's, with maybe a few changes. There is a trick to it, but with practice, you can find a flavor that suits your needs. Your friends and family will be impressed. Here's the recipe, but READ THE NOTE:

NOTE: Once mustard is mixed with water an immediate chemical reaction begins. The longer it remains in water, the hotter it gets. Acid (vinegar) will stop this process. Once the desired heat is reached, adding the acid will allow the heat to remain at the desired level. Don't wait too long before adding the acid, or you may find that you singe the hairs in your nostrils.

Prepared Mustard
1/4 cup dry mustard powder
2 tsp light brown sugar (I use dark brown sugar)
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp tumeric
1/4 tsp paprika
1/4 tsp garlic powder
1/2 cup cider vinegar
1/4 cup water
1/4 cup mustard seeds (I use yellow seeds)

Grind the mustard seeds in a spice grinder to desired texture. (I like grainy) Mix with dry ingredients. You can either mix the water and vinegar then pour into the dry mix and stir, or pour water only into the dry mix and stir. If you pour the water only, add the vinegar within the next 20 to 30 seconds to achieve hot mustard. Mix well. Put in the microwave on high for 1 minute. Remove from the microwave and puree with a stick blender and allow to cool. Cover and store in the fridge for up to 1 month.
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Post Sun Jun 28, 2009 11:03 am
Old Smoker well done
well done

Posts: 1243
Like everyone else said,it's there mainly to help the rub stick better and you don't have to use very much.It's like glue,you keep telling the kids not to use so much,but they keep pumping it on or just like the old commercial used to say, a little dab will do ya..
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Post Mon Jun 29, 2009 9:13 am
p-nut well done
well done

Posts: 611
Location: Missouri

I use the mustard to get the rub to stick.
Let it rest in the frig overnight and I think it makes for better bark on the final product. You can't taste the mustard when it's finished.
I use the basic yellow mustard.

Post Mon Jun 29, 2009 9:26 am
Northwoods Smoke well done
well done

Posts: 420
I was hesitant to use mustard as a slather as I am not a big mustard fan normally. But the mustard is an excellent binder for rub. Also, there is no appreciable flavor difference when using it. I admit to being a mustard slather convert. Slather away!
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Post Mon Jun 29, 2009 9:50 am
sizzlepig medium-rare
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Posts: 73
Location: Boise Idaho
The reason that I started using mustard prior to putting on the rub is that I have heard several BBQ competitors claim that several elements in the mustard including the vineger, open the pores of the meat and allow the rub to penetrate the surface. The mustard then helps to form a nicer bark. I have found that I need to cut back on the amount of salt that I am adding to my rub. In my own experience, I do detect a slight difference in taste of the bark. With the mustard, the bark seems to have a little more tartness. That could just be me though. The next time I smoke some butts, I will do a side by side comparison and try to get a definate answer.
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Post Mon Jun 29, 2009 7:03 pm
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The nice thing about mustard is that heat tends to break down the heat and the flavor a lot. The same goes for mustard oil, which is used in Indian cooking - it's extremely hot when uncooked but the heat disappears during the cooking. I can barely notice the difference between a rack of ribs with mustard slather and one without - except that folks tend to prefer the one with the mustard slather.
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