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CG Mod Cooking Chamber Gasket with pics

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Post Sun Feb 15, 2009 8:51 pm
Meat Popsicle medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 66
Location: San Jose, CA
(This is the second of four posts detailing the mods that I have made to my CharGriller Smoker Pro.)

This mod helps contain heat by reducing the amount of hot air that escapes from a standard CG Smoker.

It places a gasket on all four sides that are exposed when the two halves of the cooking chamber open.

Three sides of the gasket are installed on the upper half of the grill: The left, right and back sides. The grill construction makes it difficult to put the front side on the upper half, so it is installed on the bottom.

The gasket material chosen is 5/8" fiber glass rope gasket material intended for wood stoves. On the front and sides the material is installed in a Z-bar channel. On the rear, it is compressed between the upper and lower halves without extra support.

The Z-bar material is extruded aluminum 1/2"x7/16"x1/2" with a thickness of 0.050". The only known source for this is http://www.tamlyn.com/index_files/AluminumProducts.htm

Overview of Gasket Placement
See the material on the edges of the upper half and in the foreground just behind the front shelf.
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The Aluminum Z-Bar Material
Contains the gasket material in the area between itself and the wall of the cook chamber.
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Detail of the front gasket
Showing the rivet mounting, the glass rope (before the end was trimmed and gooped to restrain it), the cut out for the shelf bracket. And yes, it has been painted with High Temp paint.
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Detail of the side gasket
From the inside of the cooker, showing the riveted mounting and the glass rope material. Not visible, 1/4" dowel laid behind the rope to shim it out for better contact. Also not visible, high temp RTV holding the gasket in the channel.
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Side gasket from the front
Also visible is the stack extension of 3" flexible vent tube. The tube is secured at the grill level by inserting a 'connector' segment of aluminum sheet and screwing into that through the cover.

Also visible is the back side of the replacement thermometer. It is installed in a 13/16" hole in a nominal 1-1/2" Knockout plug (electrical aisle). The knockout plug snaps into the existing hole.
Image

Detail of the Gasket Transition from the Side to the Rear
A single piece of gasket material is used, down the left side, across the back and up the right, to minimize opportunities for slippage.

The rear section is attached directly to the back of the upper half (after suitable cleaning) with high temp RTV. It is squeezed between the two halves when the chamber is closed.
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Detail of Hinge Washer
Adding a fender washer or other spacer between the hinge parts of the upper and lower halves (on both sides) takes up almost all left-right slop on the lid. (YMMV). This makes the points of contact on closing much more consistent, which results in a better seal against the gasket.
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Initially, there were a number of leaks still visible with a smokey fire. With more time in place (and a few judicious strokes with the dead blow hammer) the seal is quite good.
Building my carbon footprint one chimney-full at a time.

Post Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:39 pm
d_holck well done
well done

Posts: 839
Location: Illinois
Hey Meat Popsicle -

I really appreciate the detailed descriptions and photos on this set of mods. You've done a really good job sealing up that CG. Thanks for sharing!

Doug
"... mmmmmmm 'bacon'."

CG Outlaw w/SFB
UDS
Old classic Weber Kettle

Post Mon Feb 16, 2009 9:25 pm

Posts: 34
Location: Carlisle, PA
:shock: You guys are as bad as the guys on the corvette forum...

:lol:

Post Wed Feb 18, 2009 11:39 am
CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5839
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
GreaseMonkey wrote:
:shock: You guys are as bad as the guys on the corvette forum...

:lol:


I wouldn't say we're that bad. For one thing, we're talking about fuel efficiency here, which is something Corvettes aren't well-known for. :twisted:

Great mods, Meat Popsicle! :D
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

Post Wed Feb 18, 2009 7:09 pm
Meat Popsicle medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 66
Location: San Jose, CA
CanadaBBQGuy wrote:
GreaseMonkey wrote:
:shock: You guys are as bad as the guys on the corvette forum...

:lol:


I wouldn't say we're that bad. For one thing, we're talking about fuel efficiency here, which is something Corvettes aren't well-known for. :twisted:

Great mods, Meat Popsicle! :D


I wouldn't say its all about fuel efficiency. For me, its more about sleeping longer and later when I don't have to get up to feed the fire over-night. :lol:
Building my carbon footprint one chimney-full at a time.

Post Wed Feb 18, 2009 7:34 pm
CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5839
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
Meat Popsicle wrote:
CanadaBBQGuy wrote:
GreaseMonkey wrote:
:shock: You guys are as bad as the guys on the corvette forum...

:lol:


I wouldn't say we're that bad. For one thing, we're talking about fuel efficiency here, which is something Corvettes aren't well-known for. :twisted:

Great mods, Meat Popsicle! :D


I wouldn't say its all about fuel efficiency. For me, its more about sleeping longer and later when I don't have to get up to feed the fire over-night. :lol:


Right. That's fuel efficiency. If the rig burns less fuel, you don't have to get up and stoke it. :D
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

Post Fri Feb 20, 2009 2:54 pm
B-More BBQ medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 72
Location: Baltimore, MD
What was the cost of shipping on the Z-Bar Material? It looks like you are forced into buying 40 feet when ideally 8 feet should do the trick per grill.

Anyone in the DC/Baltimore Area who would be interested in placing an order and splitting up the bounty?

Post Fri Feb 20, 2009 10:30 pm
Meat Popsicle medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 66
Location: San Jose, CA
mjcalder1 wrote:
What was the cost of shipping on the Z-Bar Material? It looks like you are forced into buying 40 feet when ideally 8 feet should do the trick per grill.

Anyone in the DC/Baltimore Area who would be interested in placing an order and splitting up the bounty?


The shipping cost was pretty reasonable, as such things go. $11.60 to California via UPS Ground, as I recall. Comes in an 8' cardboard tube.

I chose the z-bar because it allowed me to attach it without putting rivets into the area where the rope gasket was going. It also moved the point of attachment away from the edge so that the front gasket was easier to manage.

In a pinch, you can make U-channel work almost as well, but I was feeling a bit of the perfectionist when I did it.

I tried working through Tamlyn's listed retailer/distributors, but got no joy locally. You might have better luck if you can persuade one of them to order on your behalf, avoiding the 5 stick minimum for yourself.
Building my carbon footprint one chimney-full at a time.

Post Tue Feb 24, 2009 8:52 pm
sixfofalcon medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 211
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Looks like a great mod. Thanks for sharing! 8)

Do you think maybe L stock will work? I'm not sure the inner edge is necessary for a good seal.

Post Tue Feb 24, 2009 9:43 pm
Meat Popsicle medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 66
Location: San Jose, CA
sixfofalcon wrote:
...Do you think maybe L stock will work? I'm not sure the inner edge is necessary for a good seal.


It might work fine. You would be depending on the RTV to keep it in place, but the horizontal part of the 'L' should take most of the force.

I used pop-rivets to attach it to the metal of the CG, and those protrude inward so they would interfere with the gasket if the tip of the 'L' was aligned with the edge. If you put the tip of the 'L' away from the edge, that would not be an issue.

The only drawback that I see is that you can't easily (and invisibly) slip a shim behind the gasket to make it stick out further for better contact. If you get everything in just the right place, you would not need to shim it. I try never to count on that, though.

The L material is certainly easier to come by and that counts for a lot.
Building my carbon footprint one chimney-full at a time.

Post Wed Feb 25, 2009 9:18 am
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
Welcome to the board sixfofalcon! :D
Image

Post Fri Feb 27, 2009 4:39 pm
Burnt Knuckle Hair medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 55
Location: Greenville, NC
I local glass shop ordered a 12' piece of aluminum z bar for me today, total cost was $27.00. Since they had to put an order in with their supplier anyway they told me no charge for shipping! It should be in next week.

Post Sat Mar 07, 2009 11:18 am
sixfofalcon medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 211
Location: Philadelphia, PA
The rope gasket material I got is thinner than I expected. It's maybe 1/8" thick in a compressed state. I'll have to check the gap distance on the back edge of the main chamber when the lid is down and see if shimming might be necessary to get a decent seal. What did you use for the "shim" that you mention, Meat Popsicle?

I'm thinking that along the front edge of the main chamber, I may just use the existing lip that's fabricated into the hood rather than making a new one on the lower half of the main chamber. It seems that the existing lip already almost seals the chamber when it is closed, and the addition of the gasket may be all that is needed.

Post Sat Mar 07, 2009 10:36 pm
Meat Popsicle medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 66
Location: San Jose, CA
sixfofalcon wrote:
The rope gasket material I got is thinner than I expected. It's maybe 1/8" thick in a compressed state. I'll have to check the gap distance on the back edge of the main chamber when the lid is down and see if shimming might be necessary to get a decent seal. What did you use for the "shim" that you mention, Meat Popsicle?


The rope gasket I got was nominal 5/8". It fits in the channel nicely. I put a 1/4" dowel behind it (in the channel) when I needed it to stick out further for good contact.

Is that the flat rope or the thinner rope that you got? I will assume that the flat is what you are referring to...

To make the flat (thin) material work would probably require using carefully positioned right-angle aluminum, since you could not make use of the trough in the z-bar.

It will be trickier to work with because the thicker rope gives you more slop to work with. In other words, you will need to place the aluminum more precisely to insure that it will fit and compress the gasket all the way around. Shimming will be more difficult because the shim will need to be stuck to the aluminum on one side and the glass rope on the other.

sixfofalcon wrote:
I'm thinking that along the front edge of the main chamber, I may just use the existing lip that's fabricated into the hood rather than making a new one on the lower half of the main chamber. It seems that the existing lip already almost seals the chamber when it is closed, and the addition of the gasket may be all that is needed.


The thin, flat material may work very well in the front, on the upper lip as you were describing it. On the other hand, it might be very difficult to use in the rear where there tends to be a large gap between the upper and lower portions.

If you use this technique on the front, make sure that you do that side (front) first. Adding the thickness of the rope will lift the top somewhat, which will, in turn, increase the gap along the sides (more at the front than at the back).
Building my carbon footprint one chimney-full at a time.

Post Sun Mar 08, 2009 7:58 pm
sixfofalcon medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 211
Location: Philadelphia, PA
The gasket material I used was 5/8" wide, but although it was called "rope" it was more like a tape or webbing. I ended up gluing it along the existing lip in the front edge of the lid.

Then I cut 2 pieces of the angle aluminum (3/4"x3/4" "L" profile, 1/16" thickness) to fit from the hinges forward along the outside of the grill to the front edge. I had to notch the aluminum for the bolt on each side of the grill that supports the warming rack, and I rounded the outside corners on the grinding wheel. Then I glued the gasket material to the upper flat of the aluminum and lined it up on the grill with the lid closed and resting on the front gasket. I pushed up just hard enough on the side lip to compress the gasket slightly without lifting the lid off the front gasket, then drilled a hole for the frontmost rivet. Once that was pop-riveted in place, I moved to the rear and again lifted up on the lip to just begin to take some of the weight off of the hinge, then drilled and riveted it in place. I followed that with a single rivet in the center of the lip, then repeated the whole process on the other side.

All in all it worked extremely well. I haven't done anything with the back edge yet because I ran out of gasket material. Some rolled and crumpled aluminum foil sealed the gap along the back enough for tonight's cook (beer can chicken) and there was zero smoke leakage on the front edge or either side.

Here are some crummy pics. I apologize for the bird droppings on the lid. There were about 300 creepy starlings in my oak tree today enjoying the springlike weather. I guess I'm lucky I didn't receive any direct hits. :roll:

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