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First time grill buyer with multiple questions...

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Lorenzo raw
raw

Posts: 4
Location: Atlanta, GA
Just got a new Genesis Gold C grill and I've got some questions for veteran grillers.

First, it lit on the first ignition and preheated to 500 degrees in under 3 minutes. That's FAST. But, when it is heating that fast I'm seeing some smoke under the hood at temps above around 400 degrees or so.

Also, the flavorizer bars, particularly the one in the middle and the two above the other two burners to a lesser degree, turned a golden to brown color. I noticed that the flames had some orange coloring on the high setting, but were all blue at the medium settings.

My questions are these:

1. Should I be concerned by the fact that the flavorizer bars are turning colors or is that part of the natural process of "breaking in" or "seasonin" of a new grill?

2. Is the orange flame issue on the high setting a concern? Could I have the propane gauge open too high? Should I lower the level of the propane or are the burners just that powerful?

3. Same thing with the smoke. Is that just part of the fact that it is preheating up that fast?

4. The flavorizer bars and cooking surface are both stainless. Is that okay? Is there something better?

I haven't cooked anything on it yet, but I am stoked to do so quickly. Thanks for all of your help.

Lorenzo

Post Fri Sep 12, 2003 8:24 pm
Luke medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 89
Location: Texas

I went through the same thing when I got my first grill. I have since learned that all grills change colors and give off some smoke when they are first seasoned. My reccomendation is to lightly rub the interior of the grill with oil and then run it at medium for about an hour, this will set the grill. I would use cast iron grills but it is too wet where I live.
Live Different

Post Sat Sep 13, 2003 8:52 am
Longmill

I suspect that the smoke you saw was the factory protective coatings burning off. And, I agree with the previous poster. Fire up the grill and get it warm. Turn it off and while it's still warm, paint the inside with peanut oil. You want a thin film of oil, so wipe off any excess puddles. Then, fire up your grill to medium heat and let the oil bake on for a couple of hours or so. Also, throw on a few wood chips or chunks. That'll help expedite the process, too.

As you continue to season your cooker you'll eventually get a black coating on the interior. It'll be a combination of smoke, grease, and oils from your cooking. This is a good thing as it will protect the metal. Same principle as seasoning a cast iron skillet.

I don't have any experience with your cooker, but I do suspect that you need to tweak the air flow, a bit to get the best flame color. Check your manual to see if there are any specific instructions. Make very small adjustments and observe the results. That'll help you further fine tune the flame.

Stainless steel will change colors, especially if it's overheated. Don't worry about those changes, if you're operating your cooker according to the manufacturer's instructions. It's just a cosmetic issue and as far as I know doesn't affect anything else.

One illustration that I like to use is that breaking in a new cooker is like buying a new pickup truck. When you first get it, you worry about every little ding or scratch in the bed. After driving the truck for a while, that worry goes away. When that happens, the truck is used for what it's intended to do -- haul stuff!. :-) Same with your cooker. Throw on some chickens, steaks, or burgers. Soon, you'll have it broken in (seasoned) and will be enjoying some good eats!

Hope my rambling helps a bit.

Longmill

Post Sat Sep 13, 2003 1:45 pm
Lorenzo raw
raw

Posts: 4
Location: Atlanta, GA
Thanks for the comments. I'm looking forward to using the grill for a long time.

Post Sat Sep 13, 2003 3:04 pm
egkor rare
rare

Posts: 39
Location: Tx
Lorenzo,

For a first time grill buyer, you really picked a great grill!

I have a Silver-B (similar to your Gold-C), and am very pleased with it and the quality of food that comes off of it.

Try S.R.'s beer can chicken recipe on your Genesis. It will knock your socks off! The Genesis is a particularly good grill for this recipe.

Congrats on your Gold!

-egkor

Post Mon Sep 15, 2003 7:53 am
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
I have a Gold D just around 6 months old now, and everything you've descibed is normal. If you follow the above posts you should be off and running.
A few notes that you'll notice (or at least I have).

1. Over time the flavorizer bars will accumulate a build up of drippings. It'll look almost like lichens on a stone. This is normal, but when the buildup gets to heavy that it effects the vaporizing of other drippings, its time to clean them off.

2. Keep the grates oiled. And yes they do change color and will not be that stainless color for long.

3. If you're anything like me, when you get it hot to clean it you'll start charring the hair off your knuckles soon. Buy a long, and I mean long (not 18") grill brush. I posted under the name "Matt" and topic "Long Handled Grill Brush" not long ago. Check it for a source of a good one.

The only problem I've had with my Gold D is that the electric ignitor has had some issues. Not always reliable. I think its because the ignitor and the "gas box" are coroded (eventhough I keep it covered).

All in all you've got a great grill.

Good luck and Enjoy

Post Thu Oct 09, 2003 3:53 pm
PaulP well done
well done

Posts: 681
Location: Beautiful St. Mary's County, Maryland
Grand Scale wrote:
Over time the flavorizer bars will accumulate a build up of drippings. It'll look almost like lichens on a stone. This is normal, but when the buildup gets to heavy that it effects the vaporizing of other drippings, its time to clean them off.

The only problem I've had with my Gold D is that the electric ignitor has had some issues. Not always reliable. I think its because the ignitor and the "gas box" are coroded (eventhough I keep it covered).


If you pre-heat your grill hot enough to burn off the grates, the flavorizer bars certainly get hot enough to burn clean. I've had my Weber for three years, and never had to clean the flavorizer bars. Clean the grease drain area below the burners every month or so or you'll have a fire (speaking from experience!)

Your igniter is guaranteed for 5 or 10 years. Check your book, and call Weber. They'll send you a new one quickly and without question.
PaulP
If you don't like the food, have more wine

Post Thu Oct 09, 2003 4:42 pm
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
Thanks PaulP I do heat her up to over 650 most of the time, but the flavorizers still accumulate. They're easy to clean and they deffinately work better after each cleaning. I got my Gold D early in production, and I think (my own uneducated opinion) that they're still working out some of the kinks. Don't get me wrong its a fantastic grill! Also I've found on the ignitor issue that I needed to clean the burners themselves. Some of the flame holes were being stopped up and therefore the gas wasn't getting enough airflow from downstream to ignite properly. After a quick "poking" with a nail to clear the hole she fires up consistantly now.
It's a good thing too, otherwise how would I eat?

"Always Go Big"

Lorenzo raw
raw

Posts: 4
Location: Atlanta, GA
is that too hot? I noticed in the BBQ Bible it says 500-550 degrees. I've been having trouble getting the temperature to remain at a constant level. Obviously, when I open the top it drops significantly, but when I have it on low, it still gets to around 400. I presume some of this has to do with the fact that it is a new grill, but when I have it on high to preheat, it gets up to over 650. Is that normal or too high? Am I concerned over nothing? Thanks.

Post Fri Nov 07, 2003 8:40 am
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
Thats normal for me. You've got a good quality grill that capable of cranking out the BTU's. Lesser grills won't reach the temps you can. The grill is meant to handle the heat. Webber will stand behind their products. If your having trouble with inconsistent temps, you may need to clean your burners. Your temp should remain constant. If you're just having problems getting the temp low, try turning off a burner or more. Even with all set on low you're still putting out BTU's by using fewer burners you can the temps you want. Experiment, you'll get it.
Image

Post Fri Nov 07, 2003 6:42 pm
dkirn well done
well done

Posts: 388
Location: St. Louis, MO
It has always taken me a couple of weeks to get accustomed to a new grill or smoker, but once you get comfortable with its abilities the fun will begin.


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