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Country style ribs

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Post Sun Jul 04, 2004 6:46 am
pderico rare
rare

Posts: 14
Location: Gibsonton, FL
I have seen many ideas for regular BBQ ribs on this board and also in Steven's book. It seems it always calls for either baby back ribs or regular ribs. I bought some nice country style ribs and was wondering if anyone has any different ideas for smoking them. (I have a Brinkmann gas grill.) I plan on using a rub and them applying the sauce near the end. I may smoke them or just do the normal BBQ if time does not permit. Thanks for any input.
- Phil
Chillin' and a grillin'!
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Post Sun Jul 04, 2004 8:53 am
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3055
Location: Atlanta-GA
I did boneless country style ribs last weekend. I slathered them with mustard. Applied rib rub to them and put them on pre-soaked bamboo skewers. I then smoked them at 225 degrees for 4 hrs. Sprayed them with apple juice every hour during cooking time. I then applied BBQ sauce during the last 20 min of cooking .They were very tender and tasty. I served them as an appetizers. My gusts loved the idea of holding them on a stick, of course they love the taste as well. If you cooking them on the grill, make sure you use the indirect method at the lowest temp. Use plenty of wood chips for nice flavor. There are 2 cuts that’s usually labeled as country style ribs. One comes from the lion (this on boneless and lean), and the other from the shoulder (contains pieces of the shoulder blade bone). If you use the shoulder kind, you have to cook them longer until they almost full off the bone (just as in pulled pork). You could also skewer the shoulder cut like Kebabs and cook them over direct medium heat. They make very taste Kebabs.
I hope this gives you some ideas.
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Post Sun Jul 04, 2004 5:26 pm
pderico rare
rare

Posts: 14
Location: Gibsonton, FL
Wow! They sure look good! Thanks for the tips.

-Phil
- Phil
Chillin' and a grillin'!
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Post Sun Jul 04, 2004 10:09 pm
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
I've never heard of Country Style Ribs.
Z, I know you mentioned a little bit about them. I'd like to hear more.
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Mon Jul 05, 2004 12:14 am
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3055
Location: Atlanta-GA
Vinsect,
Country style ribs are widely available in the south. I find them almost in every grocery store around Atlanta. Costco and Sam’s club also carry a family packs( bone in or boneless). They’re very versatile. You can smoke them, grill them or use them in stews. I love to braise them in the winter time with some Northen beans. As I mentioned, they could come from the loin or the shoulder. Let me know if you’re looking for a particular recipe or way to use them. For a starter, cook them as you would regular ribs and see if you like them.
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Post Mon Jul 05, 2004 2:32 pm
snapshot0729 well done
well done

Posts: 366
Location: New Lenox, IL
Country style ribs do have some merit.
Since they aren't as in demand as back ribs or spareribs they're usually cheaper per pound than either of those here south of Chicago.
Since there's a lot of meat on them, you generally need less per individual to satisfy their appetite.
You can cook for a crowd and only use one grill.

This is for the moderator...

If you're serving country style ribs as appetizers, you must have some heavy eatin' friends... :lol:

Good grillin' and eatin'

Joe

Post Mon Jul 05, 2004 7:26 pm
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
So counrty Style Ribs are a specific cut of meat? Its not just a style of cooking regular ribs, right?
Are Z's ribs on a stick typical preparation? Z comes up with some unique and creative dishes.
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Mon Jul 05, 2004 8:40 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3055
Location: Atlanta-GA
Vinsect,
Country Style ribs is a type of cut and not a method of cooking.
As far as I know, no one puts them on sticks. I just though it would make a nice presentation and give my guests a way to hold them, since I served them as an appetizer.
Thanks for the kind comment. :)
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Post Tue Jul 06, 2004 11:16 pm
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
Your Welcome Z,
It does make a nice presentation, and I'll bet it keeps everyone's hands cleaner too.

Is there a traditional style of preparing country style ribs?
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Wed Jul 07, 2004 9:21 am
RichD medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 280
Location: New Jersey
I make country style ribs all the time. As mentioned above they are usually cheaper than baby's or spare ribs, but they have the same great taste.
I usually paint them with a honey mustard slather then use a brown sugar rub, but any slather and or rub you would use for ribs will be fine. They usually take about 4 hours on my Silver Smoker at a cooking temp of around 250.
They also make a great winter dinner done in a pressure cooker with potatoes and sauerkraut.

RichD

Post Wed Jul 07, 2004 1:05 pm
MrEd rare
rare

Posts: 19
Location: Utah, Central
We tried this recipe last night and it was excellent. It's all I can do to wait another hour 'til lunch time so I can go reheat the leftovers.

http://www.cooks.com/rec/doc/0,1827,150 ... 07,00.html

Post Wed Jul 07, 2004 1:23 pm
MrEd rare
rare

Posts: 19
Location: Utah, Central
oops, forgot to say we cooked them for about twice as long as the recipe calls for so you would want to keep an eye on it.

Post Wed Jul 07, 2004 3:16 pm
Info@Workman Site Admin
Site Admin

Posts: 590

I would add that country ribs seem a little meatier, but also a little fattier, than babybacks. If you tend to like ribs a little sloppier, you'll probably like country ribs. If you like ribs to be a bit drier, go with babybacks.

I like the flavor a lot, and they will work well with any of your favorite recipes. If you see some on sale, give them a shot--they're definitely a good value.

Info

Post Wed Jul 07, 2004 3:36 pm
RichD medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 280
Location: New Jersey
The reason country style ribs seem meatier, but fattier is due to where they come from. They are not actually rins, but are generally cut from the pork shoulder where the butt comes from. This is why the bone looks like a small blade. As Z said they come bone in or boneless. I prefer bone in for BBQing so they stay together. Although, I didn't think to skewer them. I will have to try that some time.

RichD

Post Wed Jul 07, 2004 8:00 pm
CharlieG raw
raw

Posts: 9
Location: Northern VA
As everyone else has noted, country-style ribs are widely available. . . I prefer to
do mine with my Jamaican jerk rub. Sear them over the hot zone on my grill, then
finish them off with the addition of allspice infused cherrywood chips over the coal
bed. The wife loves them, but I still prefer "bones" over the country-style.

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