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First London Broil

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Post Tue Apr 27, 2004 5:11 pm
hotchef well done
well done

Posts: 319
Location: Florence, AL
I bought my first London Broil today and I plan on doing it this weekend. The meat is about 1 1/4 inches thick and weigh 1.90 pounds. Can't wait. I looked back at some old posts and I found some tips on tenderizing them. I saw someone had said that a Jaccard tenderizer works wonders. I want one REALLY bad but don't have the funds right now so I am going to have to try another way. Another post said something about making shallow slits at 45 degree angles across the meat and then marinating in Italian dressing. This sounds really good so I am probably going to try this. Just wondering if anyone has any other good tips or marinades.

I also noticed tips on slicing the meat after grilling it. If anyone could elaborate on that, I would be greatly appreciative. I'm not really sure what "against the grain" means when it comes to meat.

Hotchef
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Post Tue Apr 27, 2004 5:37 pm
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
Hotchef-
This is a great cut of meat. Growing up we called it family steak, due to the cost and ability to fead a family. There are so many things you can do with this is simply tough to go wrong. When I experiment this is what I do it with. So thats what I'll encourage you to do as well.
My go-to is equal parts italian dressing and catilina dressing as a base then add worcheschershire (sp) mustard, garlic, seasoned pepper.
I've also done wine, ginger, cumin (not all at once) plus just about anything else you can think of. Use you inagination
The jaccacard is great but not essential. If you feel that you must tenderize it just pound on it a bit (nobody better make a beat your meat wise crack here...,) that should help.

As for slicing, typically in london broil that means width wise not longwise. Think of how you slice bread. Cut as thin as you can and lay the blade of the knive at about 45 degrees.

Good Luck.
I know you'll enjoy it.
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Post Tue Apr 27, 2004 5:48 pm
Big D well done
well done

Posts: 616
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
I am so mad the beat your meat is off limits....... My day is ruined :evil:

I like to 'beat my meat' with just a normal meat mallot... works fine but really I cant give any inspirational ideas when the punch line is brutally robbed from us

Post Tue Apr 27, 2004 7:08 pm
YardBurner BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5367
Location: Damascus, Maryland
He didn't say anything 'bout chokin' the chicken which everyone know you have to do before you can pluck it.

Now, if I can just find that munchkin....


Next time you are at the grocery or butcher shop ask them if they can jaccard your selection for you. Most have a roller type tenderizer works kind of like a pasta rolling machine.

Cube steak is done this way. They just run it through several times

YB

Post Tue Apr 27, 2004 7:16 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3030
Location: Atlanta-GA
A friend of mine told me that he uses a dinner fork to poke the meat all over instead of the Jaccard tenderizer. He claimed that it produced the same results. I’ve never tried it myself? I did find the Jaccard 16-blade at Kroger for $4.99. Also Big Lots and the Garden Ridge had the 48-blade for $14.99.
I usually marinate the London broil in Chimichurri sauce. It’s made out of 3 green herbs (of your choice), garlic, olive oil and lemon juice. You put all the ingredients in a food processor and zap them until smooth. Add salt and pepper to taste. Marinate the steak in half of the sauce and reserve the rest for drizzling over the steak after it’s been cooked and sliced. I also like a combination of Worcestershire sauce, pineapple juice and Italian dressing for marinating the steak.
As far as cutting across the grain, think of 10 to 15 bamboo skewers laid parallel to each others, and you’re cutting across them to form little pellets. Another word, you’ll be cutting across the lines of the meat and not along them.
I hope this helps. Let us know how it turned out.

Post Tue Apr 27, 2004 8:28 pm
Chicago SP rare
rare

Posts: 45
Location: Chicago
You guys are making me hungry! How do you cook one of these?

sp

Post Tue Apr 27, 2004 9:18 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3030
Location: Atlanta-GA
I usually cook the London Broil on a hot grill for quick searing. This steak is best cooked to medium-rare. I can’t give you an exact time, because this depends on the thickness of the steak. Last time I treated it with the Jaccard tenderizer, it flattened out on me a little (this could’ve been my fault for pressing too hard), but it did turn out very tasty and tender. Anyway, it should take only few minutes per side. Use an instant read thermometer to check for doneness.

Post Tue Apr 27, 2004 9:41 pm
Chicago SP rare
rare

Posts: 45
Location: Chicago
Thanks, my friend. I'll give it a try! Hey, ever use a dry rub on such a cut, or best to stay with the marinade?

sp

Post Tue Apr 27, 2004 10:07 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3030
Location: Atlanta-GA
I usually use dry rub on more fat marbleized steaks such as Ribeye. I prefer sauces on steaks that tend to dry out the next day (I love left over steak for lunch the next day) such as top round and flank. Having said that, I did not mean that this steak is dry just needs a little help sometimes. I’m sure dry rub will work just fine.

Post Tue Apr 27, 2004 10:14 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3030
Location: Atlanta-GA
Also I forgot to add another favorite marinade. Use your favorite bloody Mary mix (vodka included) or just plain V8 plus Worcestershire sauce, marinate the London Broil overnight, and then grill it. The tomato juice tenderizes this steak and gives it a great taste.

Post Wed Apr 28, 2004 12:39 am
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
I like those marinade ideas. Definitely go with a hot flame and a good sear. Do yourself a favor and get a Jaccard when you can. You can still do a great London Broil without one but it makes a noticeable difference thats well worth the money.
In fact, after doing a few London Broils without it, you'll be better able to appreciate the difference once you do get one.
Also don't forget to let the meat rest (from the beating) for at least 5 minutes after coming off the grill.
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

Post Wed Apr 28, 2004 9:47 am
Chicago SP rare
rare

Posts: 45
Location: Chicago
I do believe my weekend menu has been planned!!

sp

Post Wed Apr 28, 2004 3:18 pm
TOMP rare
rare

Posts: 43
Location: Rochester Hills,MI
In regards to the Jaccard. I saw the same type tool at Meijer but made by Demi. It looked as thought it would do the job, I bought my Jaccard about 10 years ago at a resturant supply house for about $40. Jaccard is the comany that first came up w/ this tool. I'm not sure if all these other tools are copies like the Demi. My Jaccard is heavy duty ans has seen it's share of meat. I love using it on all meats b/4 marinadeing. I feel it helps the meat suck up the marinade.

Tom

Post Wed Apr 28, 2004 6:25 pm
Airfoils well done
well done

Posts: 1063
I've been poking holes in my steaks with a fork before i cooked them since i was a kid but the jaccard is a nice tool.

Post Wed Apr 28, 2004 6:51 pm
messickzr rare
rare

Posts: 24
In case anyone was wondering (like myself) what the Jaccard looks like here is a link...

Jaccard

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