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Smokers

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Post Sun Apr 04, 2004 9:56 pm
Zuieback

I am interested in learning more about smoking food. I have been looking at an offset smoker from Char-Broil. Is this a good starter unit to learn on, and do you have any suggestions for other brands/models? Currently I use a Weber propane grill but am interested in branching out. :D

Post Sun Apr 04, 2004 11:10 pm
ThrRoff well done
well done

Posts: 999
Location: Washington, DC

Zuieback,

Welcome to the Board. I have a Brinkman smoker, and it is very similar to a Charbroil. I found it is difficult to control the heat in the Brinkman. May be I am still just beginning. I think if I was starting I would go for a Weber Smoky Mountain. Many folks really like them.
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Post Sun Apr 04, 2004 11:27 pm
YardBurner BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5374
Location: Damascus, Maryland
The Weber is easier to contol. The offset Brinkmann/Charbroil have a greater capacity to be sure. For personal use and as a beginner the Weber leaves little to be desired.

Having worked my way throught he WSM and had an original New Braunfels Hondo for almost 8 years. I'm rollin' up my quarters and saving up for a Klose or a Pitts and Spits.

If you have the resources a Big Green Egg or similar is also a very forgiving and thrifty unit for smoking. For both novice and smoke eater.

YB

Post Sun Apr 04, 2004 11:30 pm
ThrRoff well done
well done

Posts: 999
Location: Washington, DC

Yard,

What do you think is wrong with the Weber? I have been toying with the idea of getting one.
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Post Sun Apr 04, 2004 11:39 pm
Zuieback

What is the difference between an offset like the char-broil and a canister type like the weber? I was under the impression that an offset bbq would give you more indirect heat and would allow you you to cook foods longer and slower?

Post Mon Apr 05, 2004 11:26 am
YardBurner BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5374
Location: Damascus, Maryland
Roffee, absolutely nothing wrong with the Weber. I just wanted something with a larger capacity. The WSM is still going strong at the inlaws..

The WSM is MUCH easier to control and predict.
Uses less fuel to boot.

YB

Post Mon Apr 05, 2004 12:35 pm
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
Zuieback, welcome to the Barbecue Bible. Please feel free to register and join us in our obsession.

I have three vertical smokers, two charcoal and one gas. I hope to have a horizontal smoker in the near future.

The two differences that I notice between horizontal and vertical smokers are size and cost. The vertical smokers are generally smaller in overall size, have a much smaller foot print, and usually cost less (under $200). The horizontal smokers begin at $200 and soar to the ten thousands, and their capacities are much greater. Larger units also have higher operating costs, such as they use more fuel. Vertical units are recommended for beginners because they are less expensive.

Both types of smokers can produce championship BBQ. Some designs will retain heat and provide better airflow than others, but ultimately the skills developed by the cook make the major difference in the quality of the food.
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Post Mon Apr 05, 2004 1:57 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3039
Location: Atlanta-GA
Check out the posts under this link, there’re many good suggestions:
http://www.barbecuebible.com/board/view ... 15&start=0
Good luck.

Post Wed Apr 14, 2004 3:22 pm
rmurphy7625

It depends on where you live and what is available in you area. I grew up in Oklahoma and I bought a 20" horizontal Oklahoma Joes smoker made out of 1/4" steel at a local store and I love it. Buy a quality smoker and you will have it for as long as you want it, buy a cheap one and you'll replace it every few years. I have recently moved to Colorado and you can't find a decent made smoker here to save your life. And if you do you pay an arm and a leg for any good hard wood. I would check any small local stores and even talk to welders or pipe companies. They often do custom jobs but, you might have to pay a pretty penny for it but thet are worth it.

Post Wed Apr 14, 2004 3:23 pm
rmurphy7625

It depends on where you live and what is available in you area. I grew up in Oklahoma and I bought a 20" horizontal Oklahoma Joes smoker made out of 1/4" steel at a local store and I love it. Buy a quality smoker and you will have it for as long as you want it, buy a cheap one and you'll replace it every few years. I have recently moved to Colorado and you can't find a decent made smoker here to save your life. And if you do you pay an arm and a leg for any good hard wood. I would check any small local stores and even talk to welders or pipe companies. They often do custom jobs but, you might have to pay a pretty penny for it but thet are worth it.

Post Wed Apr 14, 2004 3:40 pm
Airfoils well done
well done

Posts: 1063
My 2 cents, no question a guy like you should strongly consider a Weber Smokey Mountain (aka Weber bullet). As has been stated, the temps are very stable and for the smallish footprint, you can fit a lot of food in it. Check out the Virtual Weber Bullet for info on capacity and techniques.

http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/

As you can see, the WSM has an almost cult like following (myself included) and for darn good reason. It turns out fabulous succulent food on a consistent basis. I think I can reasonably say it's a purchase you'll never ever regret, especially after you pull your first meal out of it :wink: BTW, the smoker I had before my bullet was a Brinkman and I hated that thing. I put it out on the curb with a "Take Me" sign on it and it sat out there for a week before the garbage man came and carted that no heat holding piece of %$@* off of my property.


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