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first time making beer can chicken

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Post Sat Mar 27, 2004 11:22 pm
ThrRoff well done
well done

Posts: 999
Location: Washington, DC

Vinsect,

In my humble opinion the best chicken is on a rotisserie with a rub based around tumeric.
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Post Sun Mar 28, 2004 12:24 am
YardBurner BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5376
Location: Damascus, Maryland
Where exactly is Tumeric?

Post Sun Mar 28, 2004 12:33 am
ThrRoff well done
well done

Posts: 999
Location: Washington, DC

Yard,

Tumeric is a spice used in India, and I suppose North Africa. It is kind of bland, and turns every think yellow. You are just gonna have to come down here to G'burg and taste sometime. The basic rub recipe is here http://www.roffee.org/larryRubs.htm
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Post Sun Mar 28, 2004 2:03 am
YardBurner BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5376
Location: Damascus, Maryland
Hey, Big L,

I know WHAT it is. I was just making a funny (apparently NOT) re: about tumeric.

Don't be suprised if some really weird guy shows up on your doorstep asking for a gram of T.
I want the uncut stuff. Not annatto. (look it up!)

Still workin' on the load of hickory for us!

Rob

Post Sun Mar 28, 2004 3:52 am
Vinsect well done
well done

Posts: 576
Location: Middle Tennessee
Yard Burner said ...

suppository


(beavis and butthead laughter) heh heh heh heh .

Zeke, Newcastle rocks! I haven't done a chicken with Newcastle but I have brewed my own Newcastle which turned out real well. Homebrewing beer is another one of my hobbies. Speaking of which, I've been meaning to try a beer can chicken with extra hops and malt for a more pronounced beer flavor. Wanted to try a "baseline" version first though. Newcastle is very malty and "caramely." There is a lot of crystal malt in Newcastle. That's where the malted barley is roasted so that the natural sugars carmelize. As its been explained to me, the carmelized sugars become a more complex sugar that the yeast can't metabolize into alcohol after fermentation, so you end up with more sweetness and caramel flavor in the finished product.
Anyhoo, since Newcastle is a bit pricey to use as a marinade, if you have a homebrew supply shop anywhere nearby you might want to just buy some crystal malt to add to a coors or bud. It would be real interesting to see how close it got. Homebrew ingedients are usually pretty inexpensive. Zeke, I know you didn't exactly ask for a chemistry lecture on the finer points of Newcastle. It is a helluva beer and hopefully someone found that intersting.

Larry, I'll have to try that as soon as I get a rotisserie. Maybe I can do a tumeric beer can chic in the meantime.
If it aint broke, Break it!
Then rebuild it better.

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