Board index Barbecue Board General Discussion London Broil

London Broil

This is the place to ask your BBQ questions, share information, and more.
Post Sat Aug 06, 2005 12:48 pm

Posts: 3

Yes, I know this is a technique, not a cut of meat, but I did this a couple times a long time ago. Steven says he's heard of it but not tried it.
Take a London broil, slather it heavily with yellow prepared mustard, pack rock salt into the mustard on all sides, then grill. To serve, slice and serve as usual. The salt forms a crust and the mustard soaks into the meat while cooking.
Anyone else tried this?
Old Cook

Post Sat Aug 06, 2005 1:17 pm
Susan Z well done
well done

Posts: 817
Location: Northern Virginia
Never heard of that technique. Isn't it....salty?

Post Sat Aug 06, 2005 1:21 pm

Posts: 3

No. The salt crystallizes during cooking and forms a crust that can be scraped off if you want to when you get ready to serve it.. I think the mustard coating must keep the "salt" out of the meat.
I haven't tried it for years; just hoping someone else has more recently.
Old Cook

Post Sat Aug 06, 2005 1:49 pm
PaulP well done
well done

Posts: 681
Location: Beautiful St. Mary's County, Maryland
G. B. -- It's really a BAD idea to post personal info on a bulletin board! You've given anyone out to harm you a lot of information. All that's missing is your Social Security number. For your own safety, please change your sig!

This is why most of use a nickname, not our full name.
PaulP
If you don't like the food, have more wine

Post Sat Aug 06, 2005 2:02 pm

Posts: 3

Thanks. Old as this cook is, he's new to bulletin boards. As you can see, I've done what you suggested.
Old Cook

Post Sat Aug 06, 2005 6:27 pm
phillyjazz well done
well done

Posts: 2969
Location: Philly

G B Leatherwood wrote:
No. The salt crystallizes during cooking and forms a crust that can be scraped off if you want to when you get ready to serve it.. I think the mustard coating must keep the "salt" out of the meat.
I haven't tried it for years; just hoping someone else has more recently.


On those rare days when it is too miserable to grill I roast rib roasts in the oven, and always coat them with nearly a whole box of coarse kosher salt. First you make a paste with the salt and water, and I've found spreading it on with a cake spatula works great. The salt forms a rock-hard crust in an hour or so, and sometimes you need a hammer to crack it. It never comes out too salty...

I wonder if that would work with mustard instead of water ?? Let us know how you fare with the broil .. It's sure a cheaper way to find out if it works :wink:

Post Sat Aug 06, 2005 6:40 pm
mbshop well done
well done

Posts: 863
Location: visalia ca
umm, folks, this is how tri tip is cooked around these parts.
you know, santa maria style and all. gives a good crust and
softens things up a bit. i usually marinate it over night.
don't have to overdo the kosher salt though.

george

Post Sun Aug 07, 2005 12:29 am
bbquy well done
well done

Posts: 403
Location: Ct
I haven't done it myself but I know that some people cook whole fish the same way in salt. They do it quite a bit on the food netwoork too.
currently: Jenn-Air 48,000 btu gasser, CG-Outlaw w/sfb, (2)Weber 22" Performer Gold, Weber Q

Post Mon Aug 08, 2005 8:19 am
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
Welcome to the board G B Leatherwood! :D

I've never cooked with salt like that. It would be great to see some pictures next time someone uses this method. :D Maybe we could all learn from it.
Image

Post Mon Aug 08, 2005 11:21 am
Susan Z well done
well done

Posts: 817
Location: Northern Virginia
I've seen Alton Brown do a fish that way. He used a huge amount of kosher salt which he mixed with water or something to make a mortar, which he mounded up over the fish before sticking it in the oven where the stuff hardens like cement. Others just use about 5 or 6 lbs of salt, pour a bunch on the bottom of a baking pan making a slight indentation for the fish, and pour the rest on top. Same basic effect.

Post Sat Aug 13, 2005 7:08 am
Susan Z well done
well done

Posts: 817
Location: Northern Virginia
Just spied a recipe for "Salt Steak" in a book on carving (I think it's called "How to Carve" published in 1941). Says this is a steak baked in a thick layer of moistened salt, which forms a hard crust that you crack open and brush aside and only THEN put the steak into a chafing dish and (here comes the part I like!) pour melted butter over the steak until it comes about halfway up the side of the steak (!) and only THEN begin carving. Yowza!

Post Sat Aug 13, 2005 3:49 pm
bbquy well done
well done

Posts: 403
Location: Ct
oh yeah,
This dish is fat free and cholesterol free, right? :shock: I'll bet it tastes awesome though! :D
currently: Jenn-Air 48,000 btu gasser, CG-Outlaw w/sfb, (2)Weber 22" Performer Gold, Weber Q


Return to General Discussion