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St. Paddy's Day Corned Beef

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Post Fri Mar 14, 2014 7:04 pm
JuliaBBQB User avatar
medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 58
Have you ever made your own corned beef? It might seem more daunting than it actually is. Steven offers up a great recipe for smoke-roasted corned beef. You still have time to make it before St. Patrick's Day rolls around!


Get some background on corned beef for St. Patrick's Day:
http://barbecuebible.com/2014/03/14/corned-beef-hits-smoker/

Post Sat Mar 15, 2014 9:10 am
BubbaQue well done
well done

Posts: 650
Location: Panama City Beach, Fl.

Making your own corned beef is simple and it allows you to adjust the taste as you like it. It also allows you to try other cuts of meat. I have used a rump roast several times with great results. I love garlic so I go heavy on it. Morton's Tender Quick curing salt can be found at most grocery stores. I use a 1 to 4 ratio of salt to water, with pickling spice and garlic.
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Post Sat Mar 15, 2014 10:09 am
Steven Grilling Guru
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Love the rump roast idea. How about some smoked Guinness?

Post Sat Mar 15, 2014 10:26 am
BubbaQue well done
well done

Posts: 650
Location: Panama City Beach, Fl.

Use the Guinness to cook the cabbage. That would be good. Smoked Guinness sound delicious.
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Post Sat Mar 15, 2014 3:17 pm
beercuer User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 2287
Location: Southern Californy
Indeed. The rump sounds like an inspired idea! Hmmm... I should try that trick with tritip as well. I have turned corned beefs into mock-pastramis many times. :cheers:
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Post Sun Mar 16, 2014 11:25 am
ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
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Location: Stoughton, WI
Is there a minimum recommended thickness for corned beef? I always get a few round steaks as part of my annual beef order and am wondering if one of them (about 1" thick) could be used.

Post Sun Mar 16, 2014 2:26 pm
BubbaQue well done
well done

Posts: 650
Location: Panama City Beach, Fl.

Not sure that curing is not too different from brining. The key is to submerge the beef in the curing brine and when it reaches equilibrium it wont soak up any more. I go 7 days in the frig.
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Post Fri Mar 21, 2014 10:52 am
CharredGriller User avatar
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Location: Central Alberta, Canada
BubbaQue wrote:
Not sure that curing is not too different from brining. The key is to submerge the beef in the curing brine and when it reaches equilibrium it wont soak up any more. I go 7 days in the frig.


Sometimes that's the case, but brines vary in strength. The meat will reach equilibrium, but a weaker brine might not have enough salt in it to properly cure the meat. Most are strong enough, though.

Brad - most recipes I follow go by the pound for curing time, too, so the thinner pieces take much less time to cure. You could probably get away with those round steaks, but I've tried this myself (a "beef bacon" experiment) and I found that I have to watch the curing time and cooking temperature. I often use smaller pieces of salmon too when I'm curing and smoking that, and it takes a bit of babysitting sometimes or it can turn into salmon jerky (which I don't mind either).

Come to think of it, with round steak another option is to "jerky slice" the meat, and use it for making jerky, if you're so inclined (I am). Oddly enough I've never seen a "corned beef" jerky marinade in the stores, so naturally I'll have to experiment soon... :D
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