Board index Barbecue Board General Discussion Smoked Andouille Sausage Recipe

Smoked Andouille Sausage Recipe

This is the place to ask your BBQ questions, share information, and more.
Post Mon Jun 03, 2013 1:16 pm
KJUNQUE rare
rare

Posts: 20
I made some smoked Andouille and I wanted to share the process with everyone. Making sausage is fun and you don't necessarily need a lot of expensive equipment. I'll put the particulars of the process after the photos.

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

Smoked Andouille Sausage Recipe

2 lbs boneless pork loin
3 lbs boneless pork butt
2 Tbsp. kosher salt
1 Tbsp. black pepper
2 tsp. cayenne pepper
1 tsp. white pepper
1 Tbsp. garlic powder
1 Tbsp. onion powder
1 Tbsp. paprika
1 level teaspoon Instacure #1
1 cup ice water

Cut 3 lbs of the pork butt into 1 inch cubes and then grind them with the coarse plate of your meat grinder. Alternatively you can process with cutting knife in food processor. If you choose this method process on high for approximately ten seconds, or until meat is a coarse ground consistency.
Cut 2 lbs of pork loin into small chunks about 1/8 inch square. This will be easier to do if the pork is very cold or still partially frozen.
Mix the spices and cure with the 1 cup of ice water.
Pour the spice, cure and water combination into the ground and chopped meat and mix thoroughly. Make sure there is even distribution of all the spice and cure.
Stuff the meat and spice mixture into 35-38 mm natural pork casings. Refrigerate the linked sausage overnight. This will allow the sausage to cure and for the seasonings to meld.




Smoking Sausage Step 1
Drying Sausage

Remove the sausage from the refrigerator at least one hour before smoking. This will allow the sausage casing to dry, resulting in a more even color when smoked. If the sausage has not dried completely pat dry with a paper towel before smoking.


Smoking Sausage Step 2
Apply The Smoke

The smoking method, time, and temperature are a personal choice. I like to smoke at a fairly low temperature of 200* to 225* with pecan wood. I know some people who prefer smoking at higher temperatures and that’s okay. I choose the lower temperature because I fell there is less shrinkage. Regardless of what smoking method you use make sure the sausage has reached 160* (some people say 165* should be the minimum temperature) before removing it from the smoker.

Smoked Sausage Step 3
Cooling Down

Once your sausage has reached the correct internal temperature (160 degrees F.), it needs to be cooled quickly and thoroughly or the casings will shrink and shrivel. This happens quickly once the links are taken from the smoker, so you need to have things in place . The goal is to cool the sausage down to 120 degrees as quickly as you can.

Set up an ice bath in your sink, ice chest, or large tub that is clean and sanitized. To sanitize surfaces use 1 tablespoon of chlorine bleach to each gallon of water. Allow surface to air dry.

Place the smoked Andouille sausage into the ice bath and cool until internal temperature reaches 120*.

Smoked Sausage Step 3
Blooming

To assure an even deeper and more uniform color though, you Andouille now need to "bloom" it. Blooming is letting your sausage dry at room temperature before you package it for storage. The longer you bloom the deeper and darker the color will become. In most cases, 1 to 2 hours of blooming is best.

I hope you enjoyed this thanks for looking.
Last edited by KJUNQUE on Mon Jun 03, 2013 1:38 pm, edited 2 times in total.
My Friends Call Me KJ.

Cajun Grill
WSM 22.5
Homemade UDS
Crown Verity Gas Grill
Sausage Maker Smokehouse

Post Mon Jun 03, 2013 1:24 pm
CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5795
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
Very nice, KJ! I'd heard that andoille was a chitlin' sausage, though. Is that true?
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

Post Mon Jun 03, 2013 1:32 pm
KJUNQUE rare
rare

Posts: 20
Chitlin is a term for pig innards. Andouillie and regular sausage is usually stuffed into natural hog casing aka pig intestines. Andouille is different from regular sausage in that it has both ground and diced meat in it. It is also often stuffed into a larger diameter casing than regular sausage.
My Friends Call Me KJ.

Cajun Grill
WSM 22.5
Homemade UDS
Crown Verity Gas Grill
Sausage Maker Smokehouse

Post Mon Jun 03, 2013 1:54 pm
ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7324
Location: Stoughton, WI
Thanks for the recipe! I'll bet it catches the eyes of the sausagemakers here!

Post Mon Jun 03, 2013 4:12 pm
QJuju well done
well done

Posts: 1916
Location: Louisville, Kentucky

That is amazing stuff... One of my favorites! Thanks for sharing the recipe.
Image

Post Mon Jun 03, 2013 6:29 pm
CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5795
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
KJUNQUE wrote:
Chitlin is a term for pig innards. Andouillie and regular sausage is usually stuffed into natural hog casing aka pig intestines. Andouille is different from regular sausage in that it has both ground and diced meat in it. It is also often stuffed into a larger diameter casing than regular sausage.


That's going to be really good news for friends of mine that don't eat it - I can tell them it's straight pork with a natural casing, and they'll drop the "eeeewww" faces. :twisted:
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

Post Mon Jun 03, 2013 7:07 pm
sroach well done
well done

Posts: 1153
Location: Warrington, PA
What an awesome post!! Awesome looking Andouille, time to make some jambalaya!
Image
_________________
XL BGE
18.5 Kettle Gold
18.5 WSM

Post Tue Jun 04, 2013 4:32 am
beercuer User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 2269
Location: Southern Californy
What an excellent presentation, KJ! Thanks for making the time to share it. I am enchanted by your manual sausage maker. That is so cool. 8) And my goodness, what magnificent results you achieved! (Here's where I need a smiley with a jaw-dropping expression). But in other words, those sausages are to drool for! Image
Got beer???

Post Tue Jun 04, 2013 8:37 am
KJUNQUE rare
rare

Posts: 20
You guys are much to kind. I love making my own sausage, tasso and boudin. I'll be sure to post those next time I make a batch. I think some people assume you have to have all kind of specialized equipment to do sausage. Hopefully this will show that you can get good results with minimal effort. I have even made Andouille with ground pork from the market. The sausage stuffer is not that expensive. http://www.amazon.com/LEM-Products-Saus ... sbs_misc_5 Mine is pretty old, the newer ones are better, because the whole front where the tube is unscrews for easy cleaning.
My Friends Call Me KJ.

Cajun Grill
WSM 22.5
Homemade UDS
Crown Verity Gas Grill
Sausage Maker Smokehouse

Post Tue Jun 04, 2013 10:24 am
Griffin well done
well done

Posts: 3312
Location: Dallas, Texas

KJUNQUE - your sausage definitely caught my attention (does that sound as weird to you as it does to me? :lol: ) Thanks for sharing your recipe and your techniques. Great attention to detail. I'm going to try this recipe out for sure.

I do vary a few things in my sausage making. I generally mix the meat and spices together and let them "meld" and then stuff the next day. Have you tried doing it that way? I have heard that some recipes will start to harden, though, and make the next day stuffing more difficult. I haven't had that problem though.

I like to try and start smoking mine at 140 with no smoke for an hour, then add smoke and bump it up 10 degrees every hour. I say I like to do that, sometimes the smoker gets away from me, though. Hard to maintain such low temps on an Egg. If I grind my own meat, I generally pull at 150. USDA says pork is good at 145 and I know my equipment is sterile, so I'm not worried about reaching 165. That's just a personal thing, though.

Love the ice bath and blooming steps. Very important.

Anyway, thanks for the wonderful post. Gonna try it and can't wait to see more from you. :cheers:

Post Tue Jun 04, 2013 11:27 am
KJUNQUE rare
rare

Posts: 20
Hey Griffin,
I haven't tried letting the seasoned meat set overnight before stuffing. I learned the basics of sausage making from a book by Rytek Kutas. His opinion was because salt is a binding agent it makes it more difficult to stuff after it sets up. It was also his opinion that there was no difference in the finished product either way. Like I said I have never tried this so i can't speak from experience. I have a 20 lb. electric smokehouse that I used to use for smoking sausage. I could start at low temps and go up like you are describing. To be honest I just don't have the patience to do it that way any more. But that is certainly considered to be the traditional way of smoking sausage.
My Friends Call Me KJ.

Cajun Grill
WSM 22.5
Homemade UDS
Crown Verity Gas Grill
Sausage Maker Smokehouse


Return to General Discussion

cron