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Surf and Turf last weekend

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Post Fri May 17, 2013 12:26 pm
CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
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Posts: 5811
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
I felt like a little something extra last weekend, so I picked up a lobster tail to go with the steak I had planned. I don't cook lobster and other seafood as often as I'd like, but here goes:

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Of course, corn is a natural complement to this meal, so I started it first.


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Here's the meat just before the halfway point. The lobster is basted with a basic garlic/herb butter I found on p. 498 or so of Planet Barbecue. Normally I do my steak with EVOO, salt and pepper but this one has Steven's Lone Star beef rub on it as I felt like something a bit bolder.


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Here's the meat just coming out of the second turn, so it's just halfway done....


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Here's the finished corn. I almost called the cook "finished" at this point as I could have started eating right there. :D I like the technique of husking the corn and removing the silk, and then pulling the husk back over the kernels rather than grilling the kernels directly. The reason for this is because the husk curls back to expose some kernels (which caramelize nicely) but still protects the rest. It's a personal preference but I don't like my entire cob of corn to be caramelized.


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Just about finished, but I had some extra garlic/herb butter left over to do some quick grilled bread.


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This was just an ordinary baguette sliced on the diagonal. You have to watch grilled bread very closely as it can go from perfect to burnt in mere seconds.


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Here's the finished product all plated up and ready to eat.


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I can see one spot where the shell of the lobster tail got burned through, but it didn't affect the meat.


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The bugs got a bit bad at this point so I moved inside. I didn't think to take a pic until I was halfway through the meal, it was so good.

I'm going to have to do this more often. This whole cook took about 30 minutes including prep time and preheating the grill. :D
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

Post Fri May 17, 2013 12:35 pm
tex_toby well done
well done

Posts: 1784
Location: Sherman, Texas

What a spread! I'm about to have to clock out and go take an early lunch! 8)
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Post Fri May 17, 2013 12:42 pm
ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7393
Location: Stoughton, WI
So was that corn grown locally? :wink:

That's a fantastic meal. Mrs. Chicken has a summer birthday and surf & turf would be great.

Post Fri May 17, 2013 2:49 pm
CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5811
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
ScreamingChicken wrote:
So was that corn grown locally? :wink:

That's a fantastic meal. Mrs. Chicken has a summer birthday and surf & turf would be great.


Well, as local as it gets at this time of year, so I'd say no. The really local stuff doesn't show up here for about 6 more weeks.
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

Post Sat May 18, 2013 4:46 pm
beercuer User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 2280
Location: Southern Californy
Oh my, how did I miss this before?! Talk about eye candy. That is one droolworthy cookout CBG! Tell me, do you soak your corns in cold water before you take 'em to the grill? 8) :thumbup:
Got beer???

Post Sat May 18, 2013 5:05 pm
CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5811
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
beercuer wrote:
Oh my, how did I miss this before?! Talk about eye candy. That is one droolworthy cookout CBG! Tell me, do you soak your corns in cold water before you take 'em to the grill? 8) :thumbup:


I could draw some fire from certain grilled corn purists, but yes - I soak them for 30-60 minutes before the cook. Usually for big cooks I keep them in a bucket of water beside the grill.

Some folks grill corn directly on the grates without the husk and that caramelizes the kernels a lot, but the last few times I did that some of my guests complained it was too chewy. I soak them because the corn steams a bit that way and stays moist.

The other way we often cook corn is by dropping it husk, silk and all in the embers of a fire, without soaking. I don't like it this way as much, though, as I can't tell if the corn is good or not until it's done. If you peel back the husk and remove the silk, you'll always be able to tell if the corn is good or not.

Some people add butter and seasonings to the corn before they tie the husk back up, but that's just crazy.... :mrgreen:
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

Post Sun May 19, 2013 7:12 am
beercuer User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 2280
Location: Southern Californy
CanadaBBQGuy wrote:
beercuer wrote:
Oh my, how did I miss this before?! Talk about eye candy. That is one droolworthy cookout CBG! Tell me, do you soak your corns in cold water before you take 'em to the grill? 8) :thumbup:


I could draw some fire from certain grilled corn purists, but yes - I soak them for 30-60 minutes before the cook. Usually for big cooks I keep them in a bucket of water beside the grill.

Some folks grill corn directly on the grates without the husk and that caramelizes the kernels a lot, but the last few times I did that some of my guests complained it was too chewy. I soak them because the corn steams a bit that way and stays moist.

The other way we often cook corn is by dropping it husk, silk and all in the embers of a fire, without soaking. I don't like it this way as much, though, as I can't tell if the corn is good or not until it's done. If you peel back the husk and remove the silk, you'll always be able to tell if the corn is good or not.

Some people add butter and seasonings to the corn before they tie the husk back up, but that's just crazy.... :mrgreen:


:lol: Roger all that. And buttering up corn while cooking in the husk ought to invite some entertaining flareups. I remember once when my brother pre-buttered his bread before popping in the toaster and started our kitchen on fire. Gratefully, no real damage. Talk about drawing fire, however... (embarrassed to admit this, but) I get my best results tastewise by removing the husks and wrapping in foil with butter, salt, and pepper. Why did I confess that??? :oops: :roll:
Got beer???

Post Sun May 19, 2013 1:12 pm
ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7393
Location: Stoughton, WI
CanadaBBQGuy wrote:
beercuer wrote:
Some folks grill corn directly on the grates without the husk and that caramelizes the kernels a lot, but the last few times I did that some of my guests complained it was too chewy.
I've found that this is more likely to happen when the ears are more mature and more of the sugar has converted to starch. I generally strip all but 1 or 2 layers of husk to try to balance steaming and charring.

Post Sun May 19, 2013 3:13 pm
CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5811
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
beercuer wrote:
CanadaBBQGuy wrote:
beercuer wrote:
Oh my, how did I miss this before?! Talk about eye candy. That is one droolworthy cookout CBG! Tell me, do you soak your corns in cold water before you take 'em to the grill? 8) :thumbup:


...Some folks grill corn directly on the grates without the husk and that caramelizes the kernels a lot, but the last few times I did that some of my guests complained it was too chewy. I soak them because the corn steams a bit that way and stays moist....

Some people add butter and seasonings to the corn before they tie the husk back up, but that's just crazy.... :mrgreen:


:lol: Roger all that. And buttering up corn while cooking in the husk ought to invite some entertaining flareups. I remember once when my brother pre-buttered his bread before popping in the toaster and started our kitchen on fire. Gratefully, no real damage. Talk about drawing fire, however... (embarrassed to admit this, but) I get my best results tastewise by removing the husks and wrapping in foil with butter, salt, and pepper. Why did I confess that??? :oops: :roll:


Oh man, it sure does. So does basting shellfish with melted butter. I got a few good flareups from the lobster tail.

But my favorite flareup was bread-related too. The ex-brother-in-law once put way too much butter on some grilled bread he was trying to cook on his Fiesta grill (which he ignored the recall on). The butter caught fire, ran down past the burners and out the bottom of his grill, and started a grease fire in the grill (which is why they were recalled). Parts of the grill body melted and set his Trex synthetic deck on fire. That's how the idiot learned to pay attention to a) grill recall notices and b) me. :twisted:

As for foil, I actually foil food as little as possible. I actually notice the metallic taste from the stuff. But my philosophy is if it works for you, then fine.

ScreamingChicken wrote:
CanadaBBQGuy wrote:
beercuer wrote:
Some folks grill corn directly on the grates without the husk and that caramelizes the kernels a lot, but the last few times I did that some of my guests complained it was too chewy.
I've found that this is more likely to happen when the ears are more mature and more of the sugar has converted to starch. I generally strip all but 1 or 2 layers of husk to try to balance steaming and charring.


That's actually why I'm trying to grow early corn up here, in fact. A lot of the "sweet corn" in the supermarkets is halfway converted to starch by the time it hits the shelves.

I figured out how to keep the lobster tail from curling, too. Steven butterflies the lobster tail by slicing it through the back of the tail before cooking - Primal Grill Season 1 Episode 9. :D
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

Post Sun May 19, 2013 7:47 pm
sroach well done
well done

Posts: 1160
Location: Warrington, PA
I'm with everyone else CBJ, not sure how I missed the post but WOW... what a fantastic meal..
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Post Mon May 20, 2013 9:02 am
QJuju well done
well done

Posts: 1916
Location: Louisville, Kentucky

Im not sure what all the vegetable talk is about... did you see that steak!! :lol: :lol: Delicious meal... but give me the :cow: :cow: :bbq:
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Post Mon May 20, 2013 2:18 pm
CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5811
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
QJuju wrote:
Im not sure what all the vegetable talk is about... did you see that steak!! :lol: :lol: Delicious meal... but give me the :cow: :cow: :bbq:


And that's the #1 reason that bone-in rib eyes are my favorite steaks.

The neighbor's little terrier agrees. He prefers rib eye bones to all others, and he gets as many as I can give him because he does a great job of being a 4-legged burglar alarm. :D
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

Post Mon May 20, 2013 11:53 pm
christinebbqb medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 66
A screaming red grilled lobster always makes me drool. It's a sin in my opinion for lobster to be boiled. Grilling it creates such an incredible depth of flavor. It has to meet the flames to taste good.


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