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CG Mod Cooking Chamber Gasket with pics

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Post Sun Mar 08, 2009 10:01 pm
Meat Popsicle medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 66
Location: San Jose, CA
Looks like it went well.

And you have some 'pudding proof' to go with it. Congratulations.

It sounds like you got one of the kits they sell with the glass tape and some adhesive, correct?
Building my carbon footprint one chimney-full at a time.

Post Sun Mar 08, 2009 11:27 pm
Burnt Knuckle Hair medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 55
Location: Greenville, NC
sixfofalcon wrote:
Here are some crummy pics. I apologize for the bird droppings on the lid. There were about 300 creepy starlings in my oak tree today enjoying the springlike weather. I guess I'm lucky I didn't receive any direct hits. :roll:


LOL! I guess the chicken you were cooking upset the birds. You should get a medal for cooking under fire! Good things cows don't fly huh?

Post Mon Mar 09, 2009 8:06 am
sixfofalcon medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 211
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Yeah, it was freaky I tell you--for a few minutes I felt like I was in a Hitchcock movie. Maybe this is how birds pay their respects? :lol:

And yes, Meat Popsicle, this was one of the Rutland "Grapho-Glas" kits that comes with 7' of flat gasket "rope" and a tube of high temp cement. (The part # was 95-6 if anyone cares). I suspect I would have to shim the back edge of the grill at least 1/8" or maybe as much as 1/4" to get an effective seal if I used the Rutland gasket there, and the 7 feet included in the kit left me a bit shy of the length of material I would have needed anyway. Instead I may try a traditional oven/range door seal, which has more give/loft to it. I haven't had any luck finding the thicker fiberglass rope that you used.

I had been thinking about sealing this grill up for a while, but I never really got too confident with any of the design ideas floating around in my head. Instead I just used aluminum foil (the "duct tape of the BBQ world") as a band-aid for a long time. This thread turned out to be just the kick in the ass I needed to try to set things up a little better. :) If I had to do it all again I would have spent more time working on the fit and finish, but I was more concerned with seeing if this setup would even work, first. Some more work with a metal file and a rattle can of high temp black paint should cover up the ugly bits well enough. And with nearly 2 years of continuous exposure to the elements, the whole grill could use a restoration about now anyway. :oops:

Post Mon Mar 09, 2009 1:26 pm
Meat Popsicle medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 66
Location: San Jose, CA
I found the 5/8" glass rope (round) at one local Ace Hardware store (on a cut-to-length spool, right next to the kits). Another Ace Hardware I was in did not have either, so shopping or calling around to local stores may yield different results.

Online they sell the whole spool only (more than you need at 157ft). http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId=1276013
Building my carbon footprint one chimney-full at a time.

Post Mon Mar 09, 2009 2:09 pm
davdon well done
well done

Posts: 413
Location: Wethersfield,CT.
After opening and closing the lid nurmerous times, do you think any fiberglass slivers will come loose and get into the cooker or your food? Something to think about. You can get silicon gaskets online of various sizes.
Dave

Post Mon Mar 09, 2009 2:34 pm
sixfofalcon medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 211
Location: Philadelphia, PA
That was one of my initial concerns, and I was careful to keep the grates far away from the gasket material while I was working with it. I trimmed off any loose bits at the end once the cement cured and it doesn't look like anything is likely to come loose, but we'll see how it holds up over time.

Incidentally, as I was working on the grill the other day I noticed some little tiny bits of brass left on the grates from the grill brush. They were only like 2mm long, and barely visible--I just happened to be looking at them in the right light. I wonder how long that has been going on. :shock: Brass isn't good stuff to ingest.
Weber Performer
22.5" WSM
CG Smokin' Pro (lots o' mods, but basically "retired")

Post Mon Mar 09, 2009 2:53 pm
Meat Popsicle medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 66
Location: San Jose, CA
If you check into it, you will find that fiberglass epidemiology studies have been going on with more than 70 years of data without discovering any long term issues with fiberglass either by breathing or with food (well, except in the hallucinogenic press, naturally).

The mechanisms by which it is removed from the body are well understood and entirely unlike those of asbestos from which the uninformed tend to generalize.

Check for yourself, of course.
Building my carbon footprint one chimney-full at a time.

Post Mon Mar 09, 2009 2:55 pm
sixfofalcon medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 211
Location: Philadelphia, PA
I was more concerned with the "What is this in my food?!" complaint I might hear from a guest or SWMBO.
Weber Performer
22.5" WSM
CG Smokin' Pro (lots o' mods, but basically "retired")

Post Thu Mar 12, 2009 3:31 pm
smoke-stack medium
medium

Posts: 164
Location: Rhode Island, USA
How much smoke is lost with out this mod, is there a noticeable difference in the flavor on lets say ribs?

How about loss in temps, and thus the use of more fuel, have you guys noticed a big advantage?

Post Thu Mar 12, 2009 4:07 pm
sixfofalcon medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 211
Location: Philadelphia, PA
It's all about improving consistency. On a calm, warm day, sealing up the grill isn't too necessary. But when it's cold and/or windy, the temperature fluctuates quite a bit due to the "openness" of the CG design, and things get a little too unpredictable. I hate not knowing when dinner is going to be ready, so the temperature issues were my primary concern.

I'm too much of a newb to really say much about the smoke factor. I would guess that if you are going for a very particular level of smoke in your food, this would be a worth-while mod because you wouldn't have to worry about wind taking the smoke away from the cooking chamber before it can permeate the food. But whether it makes a big difference in practice, I do not know.
Weber Performer
22.5" WSM
CG Smokin' Pro (lots o' mods, but basically "retired")

Post Thu Mar 12, 2009 4:12 pm
Meat Popsicle medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 66
Location: San Jose, CA
smoke-stack wrote:
How much smoke is lost with out this mod, is there a noticeable difference in the flavor on lets say ribs?

How about loss in temps, and thus the use of more fuel, have you guys noticed a big advantage?


It would be really hard to quantify any change in flavor, not least because you still have to cook to the same temperature, even if it takes longer or more fuel.

The clear benefit is making it easier to maintain temperature and that translates into less fuel usage (longer burn times without intervention). Longer burn times means you get more sleep on overnight cooks.

Closing off all the extra openings also helps the cooker tolerate changing breezes better since only the air inlet and the stack outlet enter into the process (after the leaks are closed).
Building my carbon footprint one chimney-full at a time.

Post Thu Mar 12, 2009 4:56 pm
smoke-stack medium
medium

Posts: 164
Location: Rhode Island, USA
thanks meat.

i hope to pick up my CG this weekend, and i am just "looking into" all the mods that have been done.

Post Mon Mar 23, 2009 10:20 am
sixfofalcon medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 211
Location: Philadelphia, PA
FYI:

The gasket adhesive that came with the gasket isn't holding up too well on the front or back parts. The RTV I used on the ends of the back gasket seems to be fairing better. I think the main problem w/ the included gasket adhesive is that it's not flexible when it cures.

Also, whatever you use, take the time to prep the surface properly. The places where I didn't quite get down to bare metal were the first places to fail, even though I prepped with toluene and a wire brush.
Weber Performer
22.5" WSM
CG Smokin' Pro (lots o' mods, but basically "retired")

Post Mon Mar 23, 2009 12:23 pm
Meat Popsicle medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 66
Location: San Jose, CA
I seem to recall reading about some problems with the Rutland gasket seal compound, that it was brittle and did not last. Used as intended (in a cast iron groove) it would not be subject to much flexing.

I can see that it would be hard on a grill as well seasoned as yours to get back to bare metal.

You described in your post with pics how you dealt with the front, but at that time you had not finished that back. What did you do there?
Building my carbon footprint one chimney-full at a time.

Post Mon Mar 23, 2009 2:41 pm
sixfofalcon medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 211
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Oh yeah, I guess I forgot to follow-up after I sealed the back edge. I ended up finding another stove seal kit that on eBay that used the 1/2" or 5/8" (I forget which) braided fiberglass rope. Since the inside of my CG lid has about a 1/8" thick layer of seasoning that would have been a pain to remove, I glued it to the bottom portion instead. (I would have like to have installed it in the top half as you did because it seems like there would be less friction against the gasket, since the outside of the bottom portion stays relatively clean.)

I went with copper RTV on the cut ends because I wanted to get the rope as close to the side edges of the lid as possible, but I didn't want the rubbing of the lid to fray and unravel the rope. Right now it seems that the RTV is the only part that's still holding well, although the pressure from the lid being closed is enough to keep it sealed for the time being.

I'm going to use a D/A sander to clean down to bare metal before I re-install the gaskets with RTV.
Weber Performer
22.5" WSM
CG Smokin' Pro (lots o' mods, but basically "retired")

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