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Cake on the Grill?

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Post Fri Jul 23, 2004 2:09 pm

Posts: 4
Can I make a cake on the grill? I was just thinking. :idea:

Post Fri Jul 23, 2004 4:53 pm
AndyC medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 87
Location: Oshkosh, WI

My theory is: “If it casts a shadow, you can cook it on your grill.” If you do try it, you would want to cook it indirectly, unless it’s really thin. Just use your grill like an oven. Bake it at 350 or what ever. Mmm .. Smoky birthday cake!
My BBQ/Grilling log - http://catertots.net/

Post Fri Jul 23, 2004 6:02 pm
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
http://www.barbecue-online.co.uk/barbec ... recipe.htm

http://www.macscouter.com/Cooking/Addit ... cipes.html

I found a couple of links through GOOGLE, I'm sure there's more. I haven't done this but it looks like the answer is yes.
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Post Fri Jul 23, 2004 7:44 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3045
Location: Atlanta-GA
I’ve done pies and cakes on the grill. I have to admit that pies are much easier to make on the grill than cakes. Cakes require more even and controlled temp than pies. After living in Atlanta, Ga. for several years, I had no choice but to learn how to do everything on the grill. If you’re not familiar with this area, then let me tell you, it’s hot and humid here during the summer months. We spend so much money and energy trying to cool our homes. The last thing we need is a hot oven heating up the house for several hours. Therefore, the grill is the only thing that saves us during those hot days (I have 5 of them). We cook, bake, smoke, and warm up our food on the grill.

Now back to your question, can you bake a cake on the grill? The answer is definitely yes. Gas grills work best for this application, but charcoal will also do. Since you won’t be looking for any smoke flavor, the type of grill you use here is irrelevant, but the even controlled temp is. The best way to do this is by using a cast iron Dutch oven or foil roaster pans. If you’re using a Dutch oven, then mix your cake recipe as usual, heat your grill to 350-375 degrees, pour the cake batter in your favorite pan, and then place it in the Dutch oven. Put the lid on the Dutch oven and place it on the grill. Cover the grill and cook according to the cake instructions.

If you were using the foil pans method, then you would have to heat them up first. Heat your grill to 350-375 degrees temp, and then place 2 oval deep foil pans/roasters on it. Cover the grill and let the pan heat up for 10-15 min. Mean while, mix your cake as usual and pour the mixture in your choice of pans. Place the cake pan inside one of the heated foil pan ( make sure you protect your hands with BBQ gloves), and top it off with the other pan (use it as a lid). Seal the edges with aluminum foil tightly. Even though I love the smoke flavor, I don’t think it goes well with cakes and pies. Therefore, you will have to seal the cooking container. Cover the grill and cook according to the cake instructions.
See my post under this link for cooking pies: http://www.barbecuebible.com/board/view ... =apple+pie
Enjoy!
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Post Fri Jul 23, 2004 9:14 pm
YardBurner BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5375
Location: Damascus, Maryland
Z, sorry if I've missed this.

Have you tried a Coleman camp oven?

www.coleman.com/coleman/SearchResults.asp

Got one and it works OK in a pinch. Best advice I can offer is to pre-heat it real well to insure constant and even temps.
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Post Fri Jul 23, 2004 9:40 pm
Roundtuit rare
rare

Posts: 32
Location: South Carolina
Dang, BBcue-Z, you are good! Soooooooo much to learn but dang I'm trying!

Post Fri Jul 23, 2004 9:48 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3045
Location: Atlanta-GA
YB,
That site is so interesting. And I also like the camp oven, but I have the GOSMS gas smoker. If I don’t put any wood in it, it’s almost like that oven with built in heat source. This smoker can reach temp close to 400 degrees and it has four adjustable shelves. So you can say it’s an outdoor oven.
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Roundtuit,
Thanks for the nice compliment. Stick around and you’ll be an expert soon.
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Post Mon Jul 26, 2004 7:39 am
Grand Scale BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 4272
Location: York, PA
Z you never cease to impress me my friend.
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Post Mon Jul 26, 2004 9:34 am
snapshot0729 well done
well done

Posts: 366
Location: New Lenox, IL
Engage Scoutmaster mode...

You bet you can do cakes on a live fire. There are a few things that will help exemplify your efforts if you have access to them. If you have or can borrow a cast iron dutch oven that has a lid that is designed to have coals placed on it your all set. This is a request at EVERY campout by the boys. The biggest advantage of this recipe is that there aren't any perishables needed, so the ingredients needed can sit in a screaming hot car, and it won't hurt a thing. First line the oven with aluminum foil. This isn't necessary, it just accelerates the clean up process. Before going to the store poll the masses (the children), and find out what fruit pies they will tolerate. I know I said pie and were talking cake here but you'll see what I mean in a minute. After you've got your answer from them you'll need to get cans of fruit pie filling. Bear in mind that the amount of materials you'll need will be dictated by 2 things. #1 the amount of bodies you'll be baking for, and #2 the size(s) of the dutch oven(s) you're dealing with. Also bear in mind that you can't add too much fruit. I'll actuallly put in one more can than is actually needed (helps to keep it moist). You'll need some kind of cake mix to add to the fruit filling. We've tried just about every combination, but for my tastes, a yellow mix works the best with the fruit filling. Now here's the kicker. For your liquid you don't need milk, and eggs. Use 7UP or whatever lemon lime soda is local to your area. The soda, and it's carbonated properties take the place of the perishables. You'll need enough to cover whatever the amount(s) needed the cake mix calls for. The only other thing that's REALLY IMPERATIVE is that the soda is unopened. You have to have fresh soda as the carbonation in the soda is part of the baking process. It helps to keep it airy, and light, so it doesn't turn into a brick. Now for the process. Put the fruit filling in the bottom of the dutch oven, and roll the oven to evenly distribute the filling. Mix the cake and soda to make your batter. Pour this over the filling so that it levels nicely. Follow your ovens directions for coal dispersion on the lid and under the oven. For most it's a 2:1 ratio top to bottom. I.E. If you need 18 coals to maintain an internal temp of 325F it usually 12 coals on top and 6 underneath. Bake for the recommended amount of time. Another thing that really helps to even everything out that a lot of dutch oven novices learn the hard way is to rotate the oven and lid every 15 minutes. I'll have the Scouts tending the duties rotate the entire ovens 90 degrees, and then rotate the lid 90 degrees. When finished (check just like home by inserting something to check for uncooked batter), CAREFULLY invert the oven on a suitable device (we use a foil lined sheet of aluminum), peel the foil off of the finished product, and let them at it. The beauty is that as it's baking the filling heats, and bubbles UP, while the batter is heavier and it SINKS, so that everything essentially intermixes together. What a great way to end the day. A campfire, fresh coffee, and a warm freshly baked cake. Feel free to change and modify as you see fit, but the baking process is essentially the same no matter what you use. We have used aluminum ovens to do this, and the results were alright, but you just can't beat cast for the even heat it's provides. Good luck and have fun with your adventure. Just remember that there are good cooks and bad cooks. The only difference between the two is that good cooks have had a lot of bad meals. I couldn't tell you how many things I've made that went from the cooking device to the trash can over the years. That's how you learn what works and what doesn't.

Good Luck

Joe

Post Mon Jul 26, 2004 10:24 am
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
Joe that sounds like fun! I'll have to try that sometime.

So does that mean the more bad meals you have under your belt...the better a cook you are! :wink: In that case, I get better all the time. :lol:
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Rifter well done
well done

Posts: 340
Location: Idaho, Boise

Here is a great site about Dutch Oven Cooking: http://www.idos.com/. It is the International Dutch Oven Society page. They are about as hard-core about DO cooking, as we are about BBQ. :-) My dad used to be pretty hard-core into dutch oven cooking, until he was diagnosed with diabetes, and a lot of what you cook in them, has a lot of carbs. If you want to do dutch oven cooking easy, get a Volcano: http://www.volcanostoves.com/. It is good for more even cooking, since the dutch oven fits inside of it. It also has a grate that fits on the top, so it can act like a little charcoal grill, too. Personally, I think that BBQ and Dutch Oven go hand in hand. :-)
Kevin 'Rifter' Rank
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Post Mon Jul 26, 2004 1:09 pm
Airfoils well done
well done

Posts: 1063
Interesting contribution Joe. I'll be giving that a try, thanks. I bake cornbread quite often in my, yep you guessed it, dutch oven. Can't go wrong having some cast iron around if you're a grill maniac :wink: And once you own a nice dutch oven, you find there is a whole community of people dedicated to nothing but cooking stuff in dutch ovens. A simple search on Google bears this out. They're ALMOST as manic about their hobby as we are but don't tell them I said that 8)

Post Mon Jul 26, 2004 7:23 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3045
Location: Atlanta-GA
I totally agree with everyone, cast iron is the best compliment to any grill. I wouldn’t do any outdoor cooking without my set.
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snapshot0729,
I’ve done a similar recipe in a conventional oven; I’ll have to try it in the Dutch oven soon.
I would add that Dutch ovens work very well inside of a grill if you’re a little worry about placing coals directly on and under it.

Grand,
Thank you my friend.
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Post Tue Jul 27, 2004 12:33 pm
Airfoils well done
well done

Posts: 1063
Nice patina on those Z though the middle guy needs to cacth up a bit ;)

Post Tue Jul 27, 2004 5:58 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3045
Location: Atlanta-GA
You’re right Airfoil,
The Griddle is brand new. I have not seasoned it yet. That’s going to be this weekend’s project. :)
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