Board index Barbecue Board General Discussion Cleaning Stainless Steel

Cleaning Stainless Steel

This is the place to ask your BBQ questions, share information, and more.
Post Thu Jul 15, 2004 7:53 pm
Marian raw
raw

Posts: 2
We just got a new stainless steel bbq and after two uses the area that has been cooked on has discolored. I would imagine from the heat. What is the best method to clean stainless steel?

Thanks,
Marian

Post Thu Jul 15, 2004 10:26 pm
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
Howdy Marian, welcome to the board! :D

Here is a link that will surely help you out: Stainless hood on Gold D turning color's already... HELP!!!

Hope you'll stick around and join the obsession! :wink:
Image

Post Fri Jul 16, 2004 12:05 am
Guest

Thanks for the warm welcome and I'll try and find some Goo Gone. I am in Canada, Vancouver to be exact but we do have Home Depot so I will look there first.

Thanks :lol:

Post Mon Jul 19, 2004 11:36 am
Guest

I have had great success in cleaning stainless with plain baking soda. Dust it over the area to be cleaned then take a damp cloth or sponge and rub it a little. On a regular basis this will get a good sparkle out of your grill. :D

Post Sat Jul 24, 2004 4:19 pm
PaulP well done
well done

Posts: 681
Location: Beautiful St. Mary's County, Maryland
Marian, belated welcome to the board.

Just wanted to say that if ou're talking about the cooking grates getting discolored, the way to clean that is DON'T! A new grate needs to be seasoned by cooking on it in order to get good performance from the grill. Among other things, food doesn't stick as easily to a well-seasoned grate. In fact, make extra effort to cook on all parts of the grate so that you get a completely seasoned surface quickly. All you need to do to keep your grate clean is pre-heat the grill to 550 - 600 F before each cook. This burns off residue. When it's hot, brush with a grill brush. use a folded paper towel to coat the grate with oil, and cook. You also want to let the interior of the grill turn black with residue. Until this happens, your grill will run hotter than normal. Don't be fooled by seeing the TV cooks always using a shiny new grill. They get a new one for each show because the manufacturer wants his grill to sparkle on TV. The cooks would much rather cook on a properly seasoned grill.

Put all the effort you wish into keeping the outside shiny, just don't work on the inside very much. Use that time to have a beer.
PaulP
If you don't like the food, have more wine

Post Sat Jul 24, 2004 6:21 pm
Marian raw
raw

Posts: 2
Thank you Paul..... we're going to take advantage of your tips. They make sense. We've only used the grill 4 times but each time the food tastes a little better. :wink:
I bought some hickory woodchips today to put in the smoker tray. I'm hoping that will add even more flavor.

When I read the different articles on here and look at the pictures of the food I'm a real novice. Actually it's my husband is a novice. I'm staying a virgin when it comes to grill cooking but I make one heck of a supervisor. :lol:
medium well

Post Mon Jul 26, 2004 1:56 pm
PaulP well done
well done

Posts: 681
Location: Beautiful St. Mary's County, Maryland
You're welcome Marian. Don't let your husband tell you that only men grill. We have several women on this board who will fight that assumption. I believe that my wife uses this excuse as a way to get out of cooking as often as possible, but since I enjoy it, I'm willing to go along. :lol:
PaulP
If you don't like the food, have more wine

Post Mon Jul 26, 2004 3:08 pm
PaulP well done
well done

Posts: 681
Location: Beautiful St. Mary's County, Maryland
One interior cleaning item I forgot to mention. Every gas grill has some kind of an internal grease collection system that directs grease into a collection pan or can. My Weber is designed so that the entire area below the burners is a funnel directing grease into the pan which is outside the bottom of the grill. This is a very efficient system that works well, but over time, hardened grease can build up, creating rough areas that trap liquid grease and prevent it from draining away. Periodically, it is necessary to remove the funnel section and scrape it with a putty knife to remove the built-up grease. The more indirect cooking you do, and the more foods you cook which render a significant amount of fat, the more frequently this needs to be done. I use my grill 3 - 4 times per week, and do a significant amount of indirect cooking, so for me, this works out to about once per month or so. I'll be posting in the Disaters thread later with an account of the consequences of neglecting this job.
PaulP
If you don't like the food, have more wine


Return to General Discussion