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Torn between two grills… need advice.

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Post Wed Aug 18, 2004 9:08 am
jayfal rare
rare

Posts: 13
Location: CT, USA

That was me btw. These forums are touchy.

Post Wed Aug 18, 2004 5:06 pm
aflevine rare
rare

Posts: 44
Location: New Orleans, LA
Jay, great observation! :) I'm thinking of ordering a SuperPro and Firebox for my father. He loves great Q, but at 72, doesn't have much patience and stamina. If he'd like one and is willing to do what it takes to enjoy this grill, I know he'll enjoy it. I'll get one for him and my father-in-law to enjoy in advance of the holidays.

Cheers ... Adam :D

Post Wed Aug 18, 2004 7:37 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3045
Location: Atlanta-GA
Jayfal,
Your observations are right on. I live in Georgia, and it gets pretty hot around here. When I picked up my grill, the gunk was already melting. I think a little sun would do the job. I had my grill in the sun last weekend, and the temp gauge was pointing to 220° before adding any coals to it. :)
Image

Post Sat Jun 11, 2005 9:45 am
BeerBrat raw
raw

Posts: 5
Location: Wisconsin
Yup, I just assembled my CharGriller and followed most of the instructions here with exception of the following. Assembled legs and bottom of main unit; then added SFB, much easier too assemble then and knockouts and drilling were a breeze. Started initial fire in SFB only and got to 200F and left it there. Gunk wiped out entirely in two hours. Looks like low temp is the trick to getting gunk out. Finished seasoning. Took about 3 hours to assemble by myself with occasional help from wife. Seasoned last night for four hours per instructions here. Doing pork shoulder now.... :lol:

Post Sun Jun 12, 2005 11:11 am
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
Welcome to the forum BeerBrat! :D

Congrats on the new CG! How'd the pork turn out?
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Post Sun Jun 12, 2005 2:41 pm
BeerBrat raw
raw

Posts: 5
Location: Wisconsin
Bob, pork shoulder was super; Wife very impressed and took a load to visit and lunch with her mother today. I have a Weber kettle and (had, just gave to my son) a Brinkman smoker.
I really like the CG better than anything I've used for smokin' before including a Brinkman SnP, the aforementioned Brinkman Smoke and Grill or the Weber. Wife has a turkey in freezer for next weekend smokin' :shock:

Thanks for the welcome.

BeerBrat

Post Wed Jun 29, 2005 4:22 pm
Guest

According to the Char-Griller company representative I emailed, you do not need to remove the gunky coating before seasoning. Just apply oil over it and use the curing instructions in the owner's manuel :Qman From Iowa

Post Fri Sep 30, 2005 1:22 pm
Queue rare
rare

Posts: 23
Hey gang. I would really like to finally season up my chargriller this weekend (preferably Sat. so I can grill on Sun.).

I don't have any pecan or as was suggested hickory for seasoning the grill. I do have a bit of random branches (some good size ala Rita) from my trees (I have no idea what they are). Can you season with any type of wood or are some too toxic?

If it is not recommended, then does anyone know of a free or cheap place in Houston, TX to get pecan and/or hickory wood?

Also, I had planned on seasoning it as per BBcue-Z's method but I saw that someone posted that the users manual has a method. Anyone try this?

Thank you.

Post Fri Sep 30, 2005 1:59 pm
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
I wouldn't recommend using scrap wood in the smoker. First make sure you can identify it. Some woods can be toxic and other just taste horrible. Queue you are in the middle of BBQ Heaven there in Houston! :D Lots of pit manufacturers and BBQ teams galore. Why don't you give a holler to Gator Pits or Texas BBQ Rub or Klose Pits, I'll bet one of them could point you in the right direction pretty quick.

I would stick with the conventional cooking woods for best results.
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Post Fri Sep 30, 2005 3:54 pm
Queue rare
rare

Posts: 23
Bob-BQN wrote:
I wouldn't recommend using scrap wood in the smoker. First make sure you can identify it. Some woods can be toxic and other just taste horrible. Queue you are in the middle of BBQ Heaven there in Houston! :D Lots of pit manufacturers and BBQ teams galore. Why don't you give a holler to Gator Pits or Texas BBQ Rub or Klose Pits, I'll bet one of them could point you in the right direction pretty quick.

I would stick with the conventional cooking woods for best results.


Thank you for the info, Bob-BQN. I'm writing those down. Can you please give me en estimate on a good price?

I called a place (chain restaraunt) and asked if they sold it and they offered me 50 lbs. of mesquite for $7.50 and another location for $10 or $11 according to him. Is that about right?

Post Fri Sep 30, 2005 4:45 pm
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
That sounds like a good price for a small amount of wood. I've heard folks talk about buying a cord of pecan or oak for around $125-$150.
Image

Post Fri Sep 30, 2005 5:29 pm
Queue rare
rare

Posts: 23
Bob-BQN wrote:
That sounds like a good price for a small amount of wood. I've heard folks talk about buying a cord of pecan or oak for around $125-$150.


Ok thanks. I've locked one 50 pound bag at one place for the weekend and am going to swing by the other this weekend as well. That will be about $20 (including a bit of gas) for 100 pounds of mesquite.

I saw 50 lbs. for $50 online. Paying $150 for pecan seems crazy - at least around the southern parts where pecan seems to grow on trees....hey wait. :)

Thanks again - oh and great pics at your site!

Post Fri Sep 30, 2005 5:31 pm
Longmill well done
well done

Posts: 2667
Location: North Carolina
Queue, if you don't have any wood handy, you can go ahead and season your CG without it. At this point, the main thing is to get the paint cured on the outside and start the process of getting the inside thoroughly seasoned. The second part happens over the course of several cooks. So, the initial seasoning is really just the first step. It takes a while to get that nice black interior. Thus, if you don't have any wood handy, you'll still be OK. The wood you use during the first half dozen or so cooks will do what you want it to do in terms of seasoning your CG.

You can usually get hickory (at least around here) at WalMart, Lowes, Home Depot, Target, Ace Hwd, and most of the larger grocery store chain stores. A small bag of chunk will get you started. Also, using one of those sources will give you time to look around for the best bargain for larger quantities and/or other varieties of wood that you may want to use.

I followed the instructions that came with my CG. Here's a link to their instructions. http://www.chargriller.com/tips.html

Hope this helps. Good luck getting everything squared away for your first cook.

Longmill
CharGriller Super Pro SFB
Charcoal GOSM
Sunbeam gas grill

Post Fri Sep 30, 2005 10:58 pm
Queue rare
rare

Posts: 23
Thanks Longmill. I printed out instructions at the link. I think that's exactly what I'm going to do. I'm just going to do the initial veg oil and charcoal sealant first light up.

I've never actually smoked or grilled anything with pure wood before (just a few wood chips over mesquite charcoal).

I did however bag myself 100 lbs. of mesquite for $15. I will probably be buying an axe to chop this down as I don't have a firebox as of yet.

Can't wait to get grilling.

Go Texans.

Post Sat Oct 01, 2005 6:07 am
Longmill well done
well done

Posts: 2667
Location: North Carolina
Great! I'm glad the link was helpful.

FWIW, I haven't done any pure wood cooking either. All of mine is charcoal based with some wood chunks for flavor. May I suggest that for your first few cooks that you use that method. Charcoal is more predictable, thus, when using it, you'll learn how the CG performs under more controlled circumstances. Once you have a handle on that, then, experiment with all wood.

If wood is already split, I use a mitre saw to get it into shorter lengths. Then a hatchet does a good job of further breaking it down to fist sized chunks. If you've never used an axe, please do be careful. (Sorry if I sound like a "mother hen"). Get yourself some type of chopping block and do watch your fingers and toes!!!!

Good luck with your first cooks. Please do let us know how everything goes. Include pix, if you can.

Longmill
CharGriller Super Pro SFB
Charcoal GOSM
Sunbeam gas grill

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